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View Full Version : 1858 Remington Pietta, hammer pull weight seem heavy



Cookie
11-10-2010, 11:57 AM
I have a Pietta 1958 Remington revolver and it seems to me it is just too much work to draw the hammer on this revolver. There is a screw that is alleged to adjust this tension, but it doesn't seem to do anything.

Can I trim the hammer spring on this or replace it or something? Is the pull supposed to be heavy? Shouldn't it be just enough to pop the percussion caps? Is there a risk that combustion might recoil the hammer?

Any and all tips or clues would be appreciated.

ukrifleman
11-10-2010, 05:57 PM
I have a Pietta 1958 Remington revolver and it seems to me it is just too much work to draw the hammer on this revolver. There is a screw that is alleged to adjust this tension, but it doesn't seem to do anything.

Can I trim the hammer spring on this or replace it or something? Is the pull supposed to be heavy? Shouldn't it be just enough to pop the percussion caps? Is there a risk that combustion might recoil the hammer?

Any and all tips or clues would be appreciated.

The hammer pull on a Pietta '58 New Model Army is not the lightest, easing the tension on the screw in the front of the hand grip should alter it but only to a degree. I would definately not mess with the spring, remember your repro pistol is based on 150 year technology.
ukrifleman.

irishsteve
11-10-2010, 07:28 PM
Ive seen single action springs that have been shimmed away from the frame where the screw attaches it.This would be a trial,and error fitting to find what you like.I bet the single action cowboy shooters have a softer after market spring availble in their world for competition use.

Cookie
11-11-2010, 04:10 PM
The hammer pull on a Pietta '58 New Model Army is not the lightest, easing the tension on the screw in the front of the hand grip should alter it but only to a degree. I would definately not mess with the spring, remember your repro pistol is based on 150 year technology.
ukrifleman.

I don't think the old technology would be as restrictive in this case as much as actual necessity. I think it might have to be heavy to prevent blowback from the nipple. The nipple is open all the way to the loaded chamber. There's bound to be gas pressure under the hammer.


Ive seen single action springs that have been shimmed away from the frame where the screw attaches it.This would be a trial,and error fitting to find what you like.I bet the single action cowboy shooters have a softer after market spring availble in their world for competition use.

Is the 1858 a popularly used pistol for Cowboy Shooters? I had thought of the possibility of Cowboy Shooting. But mostly they are using cartridge weapons, I think, and don't have the gas blow back issue that you do from an open nipple.

Come to think of it, the hammer is pretty heavy on sidelock percussion cap rifles too.

I think I am stuck with the heavy hammer, just a natural liability for this cap and ball design.

arcom the first
11-12-2010, 08:35 PM
Personally, I think the Italians make the springs about twice as heavy as need be to insure setting off any caps used. I thinned the springs on two NMAs, one a Pietta and the other from Uberti, using a rotary sanding drum on Mr Dremel. I overdid one and had to replace the spring (cheap) when it wouldn't reliably ignite some of the caps. Redid it and it makes a world of difference, especially with conversion cylinders.

YMMV but it's a cheap way to lighten the trig and not expensive if you "sand it twice and find it's still too thin."

Cookie
11-12-2010, 09:10 PM
Personally, I think the Italians make the springs about twice as heavy as need be to insure setting off any caps used. I thinned the springs on two NMAs, one a Pietta and the other from Uberti, using a rotary sanding drum on Mr Dremel. I overdid one and had to replace the spring (cheap) when it wouldn't reliably ignite some of the caps. Redid it and it makes a world of difference, especially with conversion cylinders.

....

You didn't have a problem with blowback? Of course you wouldn't with the conversion cylinders.

Joe Turner
11-13-2010, 09:31 AM
Strong hammer pulls are a subjective as well as an onjectively fact of life on many revolvers. What may seem strong to one person may be just fine with someone else. Something that adds to the issue is the ergonomics related to grip size and height of hammer spur. If you have what appears to be a heavy hammer spring tension having to reach for the hammer spur may change your leverage and make the spring tension seem even heavier. I have fairly large hands so most revolvers don't seem to have unusually heavy spring tension, but- I have a very early production Uberti NMA that has a very stout hammer spring and cocking this revolver is sometimes a bit of a chore. A careful bit of thinning and polishing eased the tension just fine. I had an original Remington NMA that had a moderately heavy hammer tension but a very smooth action which tended to ( subjectively ) soften the pull. If I am not mistaken I think that lower tension springs may be available from Brownells or from Wolfs.
Cowboy Action Shooting/SASS has a Frontiersman shooting category. SASS events require two pistols, one rifle and one shotgun. SASS is a lot of fun even if you are not vey competitive and just like to shoot. It is expensive to get started but the comraderie, competition are well worth it. I enjoyed the sport a great deal until a hand injury made me a potential liability in competition.
I would not be too worried about hammer blow back with a lighter tension spring. It can happen but careful trial of a gradually thinned spring should eliminate that concern. I have found that many reproduction springs are far too heavy and could use some adjustment. There is a careful balance between tension and ignition reliability ( and don't forget proper sized nipples-not only diameter for good cap fit but length as well ) Good luck, Joe

Cookie
11-13-2010, 10:59 AM
OK Joe, I'm convinced that a spring grinding session is in order somewhere up ahead, or maybe a replacement from Brownells or Wolfs.

Cookie
11-13-2010, 11:54 AM
... If I am not mistaken I think that lower tension springs may be available from Brownells or from Wolfs.
...

Is that "Wolf" or Wolff? Here is a link to some springs at Wolff:

http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?page=items&cID=3&mID=1

Could you supply some part numbers or something? Are these the same springs used in the cartridge single action revolvers? What about Brownell?