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  1. #1
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    Default Best 22LR semi-auto handguns?

    Opinions please on the best 22LR semi-auto handguns especially for a woman to shoot. I own two Ruger MKII's and even though they are decent handguns I absolutely hate to try to put them back together after breaking them down to clean them, I waste more time with the last step of re-assembly than I do with cleaning the whole gun, I am ready to trade them for a more user friendly handgun. The handgun would be for my wife, she is new to shooting and she really enjoys it. But, I need suggestions as to the best quality brand and model for a reasonable price and ease of breaking down and cleaning. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Thumbs up

    Colt Woodsman for me.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellis1 View Post
    Opinions please on the best 22LR semi-auto handguns especially for a woman to shoot. I own two Ruger MKII's and even though they are decent handguns I absolutely hate to try to put them back together after breaking them down to clean them, I waste more time with the last step of re-assembly than I do with cleaning the whole gun, I am ready to trade them for a more user friendly handgun. The handgun would be for my wife, she is new to shooting and she really enjoys it. But, I need suggestions as to the best quality brand and model for a reasonable price and ease of breaking down and cleaning. Thanks.

    I think you made the right choice the first time. The Ruger .22 semi-autos are superb handguns and well worth the money. Take some time to learn how to take it down a bit. I put some grease on the lugs that hold top to bottom and knock the two parts together (and apart) with a rubber mallet. Once you get the hang of it these pistols come apart and together quite easily.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by chester. View Post
    Colt Woodsman for me.

    Woodsmans haven't been made for over 30 years so they have been scooped up by collectors and are now big money items. I tend to use my .22 handguns a lot and that means they get wear and tear; not something I would want to do to a pricey piece like a Woodsman.

  5. #5
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    My Ruger MkII is one of the best 22 pistols for the money, and mine is user friendly, because I dont dissasemble it, not that I dont keep it clean, but taking it apart
    after a session at the range is , IMO, unnecessary-

  6. #6
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    Ruger Mk I, II, or III can'r be beat. The design has been in continuous production for 60 years, now. No other .22 pistol that I know of has this level of sustained quality and accuracy reputation.

    You can pay more for something else, but unless your a Hammerli-Level competitor, doubtful you'll get any better performance than with a Ruger.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by raul View Post
    My Ruger MkII is one of the best 22 pistols for the money, and mine is user friendly, because I dont dissasemble it, not that I dont keep it clean, but taking it apart
    after a session at the range is , IMO, unnecessary-
    Very good point. I regularly go several thousand rounds before cleaning my Rugers. I know some folks who just soak the assembled pistol in Ed's Red, scrub the bore, re-lub and call it a day. I spray my pistols at the end of the day with some well shaken Break Free. This tends to keep the crud moving (often onto your glasses for the first few magazines) and much easier to clean. As well, it tends to keep the pistol ticking.

  8. #8
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    My wife owns a Walther P 22,I shoot it more than she does-its very light and fits a smaller hand. Not a target pistol with the short barrel but you have an option of a longer barrel,fuctions well easily stripped and cleaned.Compared to my Ruger Govt. model(heaviest handgun I ever owned) its fun for plinking, and maybe 1/3 the weight.

  9. #9
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    The Rugers are hard to beat. For quality, ease of cleaning and accuracy the S&W 41 kicks butt but for $1000.00 new very pricey.
    The soothing light at the end of your tunnel is just a freight train coming your way.

  10. #10
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    Woodsman's are still around and the last one i saw was at the recent Gun Show here was @ AU$800 in exelent cond.
    The Ruger and Browning Buckmark seem to be very popular here as well.

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    I love my High Standard Sport King. They are around $250, accurate, and a piece of cake to clean.

    Mike

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    I shoot an original Browning Challenger and a Hi Standard Supermatic Trophy.
    Both are great guns, but magazines are a problem. The magazines for the original Challenger are hard to find and are expensive: $100 or more now. I've also got a Browning Medalist so I can swap magazines.

    The Hi Standard is my favorite. Again, magazines are a problem. Original mags with the metal base are hard to find, and the aftermarket versions can be troublesome. The Hi Standard does not have a bullet ramp. The pistol depends on the magazine to present the round at the correct angle or it will jam. ( A recently purchased new Hi Standard mag with a plastic base feeds perfectly and cost about $40.) The Supermatics should only be shot with standard velocity .22, and that ammo can be a bit difficult to find these days too.

    Both disassemble easily. The Brownings have a barrel screw, and the Hi Standard has a plunger, that retain the barrel.

  13. #13
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    I'd recommend keeping the Rugers and adding a new one to the fold. My P22 is pretty nice. Light, easy to carry, laser sight is handy as can be, and very shootable. It allowed me to pick up some much needed experience with pistols, so I really like mine.

    That being said, my wife's uncle bought a mk. III because everybody else seemed to have P22s around, and I really like it as well. Deadly accurate even in its base model form. He has had his taken down enough that he can get it pretty easily, I think it loosens up a bit the more you tear it down.

  14. #14
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    Actually was just about to post a question about the mk II and III's. There is a big price difference between the different models.... like ~$300-~$700. Is there that big a difference in quality? Or is bells and whistles like grips and stainless? Looking to get something quality, accurate, and dependable. Thanks.

  15. #15
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    I have a Ruger 22/45. It's a great little pistol, but like others have said, it's a sort of a pain to put back together.
    Fine Print:
    The preceeding opinion should be considered only as an opinion and not legal advice. In no event will the poster, Unbekannt, be held liable to any party for any damages arising in any way out of the availability, use, reliance on or inability to use poster's opinion or any information provided by or through the poster, or for any claim attributable to errors, omissions or other inaccuracies in, or destructive properties of any information provided by or through the poster.

  16. #16
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    The Rugers do not need disassembly to clean them. They are amazingly tolerant of crud. I've shot them with some pretty dirty ammo until black glop, powder residue and the wax on the bullets, blew out the ejection port with never a jam or misfire.

    Just keep the bore and chamber cleaned after shooting and once in a while let it soak in Ed's Red and wipe dry.

    IMHO excessive cleaning has worn out more firearms than shooting.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  17. #17
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    I see that many of you use Ed Red to clean the gun, as we dont have that stuff down here I use the carburetor cleaner tha comes in a spray under great pressure and it cleans every nook and cranny, as plastic doesnt like the stuff I take out the grips when necessary

  18. #18
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    Ed's Red is a home brewed mix.
    K1 Kerosene 32 ounce
    Aliphatic Mineral Spirits Federal Spec TT-T-2981F 32 ounce
    Acetone 32 ounce
    Dexron II, IIe, or III Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) 32 ounce

    http://www.surplusrifle.com/reviews/edred/index.asp


    There are other variations, too.
    Fine Print:
    The preceeding opinion should be considered only as an opinion and not legal advice. In no event will the poster, Unbekannt, be held liable to any party for any damages arising in any way out of the availability, use, reliance on or inability to use poster's opinion or any information provided by or through the poster, or for any claim attributable to errors, omissions or other inaccuracies in, or destructive properties of any information provided by or through the poster.

  19. #19
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    Unbekannt,Tks for the formula, the only item I dont know and maybe it has a commercial name is the
    "aliphatic mineral spirits".If you know it pls help-

  20. #20
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    Dont worry, I've Googled the aliphatic item and its Varsol, a component I can get at any hardware store...The acetone isnt a friend of plastics so when cleaning a gun with plastic grips or stock I'll have to take care-

  21. #21
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    An easy joke...Now the aliphatic component is not Unbakannt to me anymore.

  22. #22
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    What MJL said....Ruger MkII and III. I love my ole stainless 5.5 bull barrel MkII. you can lighten it up with a Tactical Solutions upper. Simply a rugged tack driver.

  23. #23
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    I have no experience with the Mark II or Mark II - but my Mark 1, blued steel 5.5" bull barrel Ruger has been running for just short of forty years and has had at least 100,000 rounds through it (that's only 213 rounds a month and while some months didn't see much shooting others saw a lot more; four boxes a month won't be far off). It hasn't been taken down that much - take the (checkered walnut, left thumb-rest) grips off, slosh it in suitable solvent, blow it out with compressed air, repeat, lube gently and a couple of times a year, take it down be a little more thorough. Oh - it has had the trigger mechanism replaced, with a Clark unit which cures the Ruger "gritty, creepie" factory job (present even in the Mark I and successors). And I've replaced the recoil spring a couple of times.

    It is the way to go IMO. Unless you are a lot better than at least 90% of the people shooting, anyhow.

    Another choice is a Kimber 45 with the 22 upper. Or some other 22 conversion unit of choice, there are several good ones.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  24. #24
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    Thanks for all the input and information. I'm a former U.S. Marine and I don't think I could sleep at night if I knew I had dirty guns sitting there in the safe (that's how anal retentive I am.) Perhaps I'll keep the Mark II's and also buy a small sonic gun cleaner, that way I could just remove the grip panels, pull and lock the bolt back and drop it in the cleaner and that way I think it would get clean and I wouldn't have to take it apart. Any thoughts on that?

  25. #25
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    I make my Ed's Red without Acetone as the stuff warps plastic jugs and evaporates too easily. Instead, before and after the initial cleaning scrub I spray with Throttle Body Cleaner - works like carb cleaner, just as cheap, but more plastics friendly.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  26. #26
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    I do not understand the big bugaboo about taking down a Ruger Mark I or II. I have both and routinely field strip for cleaning. If you are having a problem with reassembly, the solution is to break down and reassemble the pistol ten times in a row, or until your fingers "know" how to do it without you thinking about it. I think this is called "kinetic memory".
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  27. #27
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    You might check out the Walther P-22 in .22LR. My wife has one and absolutely loves it.
    "But if anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household, he has denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever." — I Timothy 5:8 (NASB)

    "One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them." — Thomas Jefferson, June 19, 1796

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    +1 on the Walther P22. Very practical and relatively cheap. Never had a problem after thousands of rounds.

    Even with the short barrel they are very accurate and will eat any ammo. All of the .22 ammo that doesn't work in the semi auto .22 rifles is fed to the P22 and works well.

    Light, handy, accurate. easy to clean and take down. For around $300.

    Unless you are into serious target work, the P22s are adequate IMO.

    I found them by accident and now my daughter uses one also.

    On a side note. I heard the earlier models years ago had some problems feeding. Walther must have fixed this problem, because all of ours feed exc.

  29. #29
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    I love my stainless Ruger Mk.II slabside bullbarrel and my Browning Buckmark slabside...both handle very well and are well balanced.
    Thanks,
    Ol'Duke

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  30. #30
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    I have thought about the Walther P22, but read on reviews that they did have issues with feeding and jams. If they have corrected that problem it might be a good choice, I am still debating on what I should do.

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    I would say the problems with the P22 are resolved. Older guns had mag issues, they now mill slots in them to improve cartridge alignment for proper feeding and have done so for some time now. Mine is a recent build and I got it for Father's Day last summer.

    The ONLY problems I have had with mine in several thousand rounds (Maybe 10,000, not sure. I shoot the hell out of that little thing) through it stem solely from ammo choice. From what I have read and experienced, I believe that the P22 requires a little "heat" to function properly in terms of the velocity of the load.

    Mine hates Federal, some grades of Winchester and some grades of Remington. Keep in mind, these brands were tested when it was new, they may work fine now as it is broken in, but I haven't checked because I have found several brands and don't need to shop around much.

    My P22 will eat anything CCI makes all day long, from the more expensive 100 rd packs of MiniMag to the big 1500 round packs of plain-Jane Blazer. It will even digest Remington's Golden Bullet, and while I find the Golden Bullet to be a truly filthy round, It has never jammed for me and I can find it at Walmart (when they stock the place, that is) for a good price.

    I keep it fairly clean, but it has gotten dirty and this hasn't seemed to phase it. It comes apart very quickly and as long as you use the tool that they come with, it will go together just as easily.

    I like the precision of a Ruger, they've got a feel that is something else, but I think very highly of my Walther as well, and am glad to have gotten it. I'm a much better pistol shot all around because of it, and even with the shorter barrel, I can dang near write my name with it.

  32. #32
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    We've had almost zero problems with the Walter P-22 with feeding, etc. One box of Federal we shot up would not feed worth a darn, but other than that, no trouble with any other ammo.
    "But if anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household, he has denied the faith, and is worse than an unbeliever." — I Timothy 5:8 (NASB)

    "One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them." — Thomas Jefferson, June 19, 1796

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    Default +1 Ruger Mk2

    I have a Ruger Mk2 and a High Standard 107 Military. I love them both equally, and both go to the range with me almost every time. I love the HS, but parts are expensive and it is a rare gun. The trigger is superb, though, and sometimes so light you almost don't expect it go bang. Both of mine have fully adjustable sights, and will digest any ammo you load them with. The only crap I have ever had a problem with was some really cheap Federal Red and Blue box that I haven't seen since. That was a Failure to Fire every other round in all my .22s. I love the Mark 1 and 2 Rugers, but am not too endeared to the Mk3. I believe it has a flaw in that it was designed to be"oversafe", meaning that the receiver has an extra cut in it for a loaded chamber indicator. That is retarded. I believe that it was designed as an appeasement for lawyers and should not have replaced the Mk2. That cut is an area to let dirt in and cause you grief.

  34. #34
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    Thumbs up

    My wife shoots a Smith&Wesson model 41.
    She loves it.

    Best regards,
    A
    I'd rather have a bottle in frontame than a frontal lobotomy.
    --------------
    Author of the bestseller: "Strangling small furry animals for fun and profit." (University of Lagos/Nigeria press - 1978)

    Honorary curator to the Outer-Azerbeidjan National Museum of Ancient Milkbottle Caps (OANMAMC).

  35. #35
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    I think I'm convinced that the Walther P22 is an excellent choice for her, now I just have to find one in the solid pink frame that they came out with a while back, they don't seem to be available right now in solid pink. Thanks for all of your responses and replies, I do appreciate all of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bootleggerspub View Post
    I have a Ruger Mk2 and a High Standard 107 Military. I love them both equally, and both go to the range with me almost every time. I love the HS, but parts are expensive and it is a rare gun. The trigger is superb, though, and sometimes so light you almost don't expect it go bang. Both of mine have fully adjustable sights, and will digest any ammo you load them with. The only crap I have ever had a problem with was some really cheap Federal Red and Blue box that I haven't seen since. That was a Failure to Fire every other round in all my .22s. I love the Mark 1 and 2 Rugers, but am not too endeared to the Mk3. I believe it has a flaw in that it was designed to be"oversafe", meaning that the receiver has an extra cut in it for a loaded chamber indicator. That is retarded. I believe that it was designed as an appeasement for lawyers and should not have replaced the Mk2. That cut is an area to let dirt in and cause you grief.
    I acquired a Hi Standard 107 Supermatic Trophy last year. It is a superb shooter. I recommend you shoot only standard velocity .22 in it. With parts availability and the incredibly difficult mainspring replacement issues, it pays to "baby" the 107 a bit.

  37. #37
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    I replaced a Ruger 22/45 with a Buckmark, I think it's a better gun right out of the box. The trigger is much better. Also, used to have an early Walther P22 and had problems, just recently picked up a new one and it's 100% better.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jellis1 View Post
    I think I'm convinced that the Walther P22 is an excellent choice for her, now I just have to find one in the solid pink frame that they came out with a while back, they don't seem to be available right now in solid pink. Thanks for all of your responses and replies, I do appreciate all of them.
    make sure you try out several different varieties of ammo with your p22. Mine hates some ammo brands, and loves others.

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    If I recall, Federal was a bad choice for my P22, and I think the brand was American Eagle, which I believe may be made by federal. The others I mentioned, especially the CCI MiniMag, worked fine for me. I have read that CCI's Stinger puts undue stress on the pistol and is a decent choice for killing varmints with it, or for using the P22 as a small concealed carry pistol, just not something to shoot all the time. That much is hearsay, though, as I have not fired a round of Stinger out of mine.

  40. #40
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    Before you get a Walther P22 you'd better read up on the user's experience.
    Problems with the mags, accuracy and now slide wear with the new zinc alloy slides. This level of problems just does not happen with Rugers.
    I passed on a very attractive trade for a P22 because of this.

    http://www.waltherforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=8
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  41. #41
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    I haven't taken my Mk I apart in a while (haven't shot it much lately) but as I recall the only difficult aspect of the reassembly was getting the hammer strut to engage when you reinstall the over-center lever.

    I remember the trick being to pull the trigger a bit to get the strut to line up with the cup on the lever part.

  42. #42
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    The Rugers are a fine choice but can be a pain to take down and reassemble. I like to strip my pistols to clean them. It's to bad the Brownings are not made like they use to be. I have a 40 year old Challenger with thousands of rounds thru it and it till looks new, and it's a breeze to take down. Being an old guy I like anything named Colt, to bad they're so long out of production.
    You can't own to many 22s so buy several.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by mag204 View Post
    The Rugers are a fine choice but can be a pain to take down and reassemble. I like to strip my pistols to clean them. It's to bad the Brownings are not made like they use to be. I have a 40 year old Challenger with thousands of rounds thru it and it till looks new, and it's a breeze to take down. Being an old guy I like anything named Colt, to bad they're so long out of production.
    You can't own to many 22s so buy several.
    Seconded. I have a 1962 Challenger and a Medalist. These are guns made seriously for durability. "They don't make them like they used to."

  44. #44

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    personally i will keep my baretta model 70 s. had it so long its part of my body now.

  45. #45
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    I work in a gun shop, and have heard a lot of good about the .22 Cadet kit for the CZ75, when factory fitted. Any response here?
    Pistol keeps me safe.
    Shotgun keeps me fed.
    Rifle keeps me free.

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