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Thread: Choices for .32 ACP carry piece?

  1. #1
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    Default Choices for .32 ACP carry piece?

    I am soliciting advice from the collective wisdom for a good choice for a .32 ACP carry piece.

    I have very bad arthritis and am having troubles getting my present carry pieces into action quickly, so I am thinking that one of the smaller .32 ACP pieces might help.

    After all, even a .22 sized third eye would ruin a perps day.

    I have thought of the CZ-70, but I hear that has issues with ammo.

    Suggestions, please?

    I just turned 67 today.

  2. #2
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    Hello Kgordon:

    Happy Birthday.

    Would recommend the Walther PP which has a little better punch than the PPK (slightly longer barrel and more cartridge capacity). You will have to look around for one tho, as I don’t think they are being made in 32 ACP anymore? (someone can correct me here).

    Also Firestorm makes a Walther clone in 32 ACP, there is usually one up for sale on that certain popular on-line gun auction site.

    They are both fixed barrel to frame designs which makes for very accurate shooting.

    The Walther and Firestorm are also available in 22LR if you want to go that route.

    I would not recommend anything in 25 ACP as these are only about as powerful as a 22 short.

    Hope this is of some help. Good luck.
    Was a soldier, very young, and they turned me into an old man. Sometimes in the early morning, before the sun is up, I think of fallen brothers, first with smiles...then with tears.

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    It seems that you are assuming that the strength required to work the slide on a .32 would be less than that required to work the slide on a .380. I suspect that is not correct in all cases. It depends on the design of the pistol and how well the slide can be gripped.

    It is pretty much universally accepted (at least by Americans) that .380 is the minimum acceptable caliber for a defensive pistol. With that in mind, I have two suggestions:

    1. Visit gun shows, gun shops, and pawn shops to try working the slide on various .380 auto pistols. You may find one that works well for you. Recommendations from others are fine, but until you yourself work the slide, you will not know if it is satisfactory for you.

    2. If you can not find a .380 that is acceptable, consider switching to a small five shot .38 Special revolver, like a S&W or Rossi.

    I normally carry a .45 Colt Combat Commander. I find it is easier for me to work the slide on that than it is on various .380 and .32 autos I own. It may be that a locked breach pistol like a 9mm or .45 generally has a weaker recoil spring than does a .380 or .32 blowback pistol. The only way to know if it would work for you is for you to work the slide.

    Avoid Astras. The 9mm Luger and 9mm Largo versions are blowback and have springs that would work as shock absorbers on tanks.
    Last edited by geladen; 04-23-2009 at 11:17 AM.

  4. #4
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    Kel-tec P-32...
    or better and nearly the same size...Kel-tec P-3AT (.380)
    - my personal carry -

    видеодон

  5. #5
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    Beretta makes a very nice .32 with a flip up barrel. You can load it without cocking the slide. A little bigger than a Kel-tec p32, but not by much.
    The Americans fight for a free world, the English mostly for honor and glory and medals, the French and Canadians decide too late that they have to participate. The Italians are too scared to fight; the Russians have no choice. The Germans for the Fatherland. The Boers? Those sons of bitches fight for the hell of it! - American General, George Guts and Glory Patton

  6. #6
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    “It seems that you are assuming that the strength required to work the slide on a .32 would be less than that required to work the slide on a .380. “

    The 32 ACP Walther PP & PPK is easy, the 380 Beretta M1934 is a bear

    I’ve noticed some shooters pull back the hammer before they rack the slide.

    Also the same trick for Astra 600 and 400, its much easier to then rack the slide. (i.e. With the Astra you rack it twice, once before you leave the house and again if you are carrying cold chamber).

    For Walther (if carrying hot chamber) you release the safety and pull back the hammer or pull the trigger in DA, which for an arthritic hand might be a chore.

    In any event I would not recommend the Astra 400 or 600 for arthritic hands as the recoil is also sharper than your average 9mm. Likewise less recoil with 32 ACP vs 380.

    Almost forgot the infamous Walther bite, which does not affect me.

    The tip-up barrel Beretta and Taurus do not require racking the slide.

    Geladin is right, if you can, best to try it out first.
    Was a soldier, very young, and they turned me into an old man. Sometimes in the early morning, before the sun is up, I think of fallen brothers, first with smiles...then with tears.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post

    For Walther (if carrying hot chamber) you release the safety and pull back the hammer or pull the trigger in DA, which for an arthritic hand might be a chore.

    The tip-up barrel Beretta and Taurus do not require racking the slide.
    I understand arthritis.

    There's nothing wrong with carrying cocked and locked if you have the right pistol; I carry my .45 cocked and locked. Also, the tip-up barrel is a cute feature.

    But if you are betting your life on your ability to use your carry gun - and you can't easily work the slide to clear a jam - then it would be best to carry a revolver.

  8. #8
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    Default .32 ACP or larger carry piece.

    Quote Originally Posted by geladen View Post
    It seems that you are assuming that the strength required to work the slide on a .32 would be less than that required to work the slide on a .380. I suspect that is not correct in all cases. It depends on the design of the pistol and how well the slide can be gripped.
    I understand that all right, but thanks for the reminder.

    It is pretty much universally accepted (at least by Americans) that .380 is the minimum acceptable caliber for a defensive pistol. With that in mind, I have two suggestions:

    1. Visit gun shows, gun shops, and pawn shops to try working the slide on various .380 auto pistols. You may find one that works well for you. Recommendations from others are fine, but until you yourself work the slide, you will not know if it is satisfactory for you.
    Excellent suggestion. We don't have many gun shows around here (I am kinda out in the sticks), but we do have them once in a while.

    2. If you can not find a .380 that is acceptable, consider switching to a small five shot .38 Special revolver, like a S&W or Rossi.
    I have thought of a revolver. Trouble is, most DA revolvers I have tried have difficult (for me) trigger-pulls. Even my daughter's 1917 S&W is somewhat difficult for me, although not for her.

    I normally carry a .45 Colt Combat Commander.
    Which brings up a point that I forgot to metion: how do you hide such a large piece, and yet still make it easily gotten to when needed?

    It has seemed to me that the smaller .32 ACP and/or .380s would be much easier in this regard. Again, advice cheerfully accepted.

    I find it is easier for me to work the slide on that than it is on various .380 and .32 autos I own. It may be that a locked breach pistol like a 9mm or .45 generally has a weaker recoil spring than does a .380 or .32 blowback pistol. The only way to know if it would work for you is for you to work the slide.
    Yes. I see that. Again, thanks.

    Avoid Astras. The 9mm Luger and 9mm Largo versions are blowback and have springs that would work as shock absorbers on tanks.
    Hee hee! Funny you should say that: I HAD planned to use my Astra 600: BEFORE I got the Rheumatoid Arthritis, that is. Yes. Shock-absorbers on tanks....or a 747.

    I used to play the Highland Bagpipe, and had very strong hands for many years. All that is gone now, and I have to learn to compensate.

  9. #9
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    Default Arthritis...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    “It seems that you are assuming that the strength required to work the slide on a .32 would be less than that required to work the slide on a .380. “

    The 32 ACP Walther PP & PPK is easy, the 380 Beretta M1934 is a bear
    Interesting! Thanks.

    I’ve noticed some shooters pull back the hammer before they rack the slide.

    Also the same trick for Astra 600 and 400, its much easier to then rack the slide. (i.e. With the Astra you rack it twice, once before you leave the house and again if you are carrying cold chamber).
    I have to do that with my Astra 600 in 9mm even when I DON'T carry it, like when I just go out for some range time.

    For Walther (if carrying hot chamber) you release the safety and pull back the hammer or pull the trigger in DA, which for an arthritic hand might be a chore.
    It is in any case. Although I CAN shoot all 7 from an 1895 Nagant, it is hard work for me, and accuracy suffers somewhat...but that thing has about a 20lb pull.

    In any event I would not recommend the Astra 400 or 600 for arthritic hands as the recoil is also sharper than your average 9mm.
    So both I, and my gunsmith, have noticed.


    Likewise less recoil with 32 ACP vs 380.
    Recoil does hurt my wrists, but so far that is the least of my worries. I used to shoot a Ruger Super Blackhawk .44 mag all the time and loved it. Not any more...

    Almost forgot the infamous Walther bite, which does not affect me.
    I haven't yet experienced that, and don't think I will try it either.

    The tip-up barrel Beretta and Taurus do not require racking the slide.
    OK. That is nice to know.

    Geladin is right, if you can, best to try it out first.
    Agreed...also, I think his point about revolvers is very important at this point...

    Also, at this point, I also think I need a LOT more practice...

    Thanks, fellers. Much appreciated.

  10. #10
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    Default More on arthitis...

    Quote Originally Posted by geladen View Post
    I understand arthritis.
    Thanks. Much appreciated.

    There's nothing wrong with carrying cocked and locked if you have the right pistol; I carry my .45 cocked and locked.
    I, personally, think that is actually the "safest" way to do it, but as you said, it takes the right pistol.

    But if you are betting your life on your ability to use your carry gun - and you can't easily work the slide to clear a jam - then it would be best to carry a revolver.
    Or if you are carrying to defend a loved one or two... In any case, I agree with you.

    I have also considered carrying my Cz-52, since perps wearing armor don't stand a chance, but there are several issues with that, including its large size.

    Sigh....sometimes I wish life weren't so complicated...

  11. #11
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    Default I've got the pleasure of "Arthur" itis too!

    If you're looking for the absolutely finest .32acp that has ever been manufactured, look no further. IMO the best one being made is the LWS Seecamp .32acp. You'll find their website at this link:

    http://www.seecamp.com/

    I've had my .32acp going on two years and carry it in a DeSantis Nemesis pocket holster. The manufacturer has a recommended list of 60 grain loads that you should stick to. I have stayed with their recommended 60 gr. Speer Gold Dot HP load and am happy to say that I've had perfect performance from this compact jewel. Never had an FTF or FTE. It's a superb pocket pistol. I agree with you completely that shot placement trumps caliber everytime...

  12. #12
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    I am 70 and for the most time period i carry a S&W Model 36 Cheifs Special in .38 Special,other times i carry a Glock .40 cal or a 45 auto.Why,the Smith is not to hard to hide and since you are having trigger pull problems if you need to use it just cock the hammer and fire away.The Glock and the Colt 45, have larger frame area and i am able to get a better grip and is there fore easer to charge and since i carry them loaded i am ready to fire with a easy trigger pull.I have seen mid and small frames that are very hard to load with rough trigger pulls,Get a friend to let you try some of the pistols and rev. i have talked about.As to wrist pain when firing in a large cal. you will not even think about it when you are in a must shot state.Wrist banr will help with that during pratice.
    WLD Bill
    Last edited by WLD Bill; 04-23-2009 at 06:50 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Please explain?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kgordon View Post

    I have also considered carrying my Cz-52, since perps wearing armor don't stand a chance, but there are several issues with that, including its large size.

    Sigh....sometimes I wish life weren't so complicated...
    Would you explain what lead you to the thought that a CZ-52 would eliminate the protection provided by an armored vest? Did I misunderstand your statement? You've piqued my interest, lol!! Thanks!

    Tig

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kgordon View Post

    Which brings up a point that I forgot to metion: how do you hide such a large piece, and yet still make it easily gotten to when needed?

    It has seemed to me that the smaller .32 ACP and/or .380s would be much easier in this regard. Again, advice cheerfully accepted.
    How you carry, naturally, depends on what kinds of clothes you wear. I'm in San Antonio and I wear shirt & pants. Never a suit or tie, and a jacket only outside during the winter.

    I used to use a fanny pack. Then I bought a square leather zipper pouch at a gun show that is just big enough to hold a Commander (a regular 1911A1 is too big). That pouch can be worn on your regular belt but I wear it on a separate cordova nylon belt in the normal place for a right hand holster. Those in the know will identify it as a holster but it is 100% legal for concealed carry in Texas. I suppose most people just think it is a utility pouch.

    I must confess that lately I have been wearing colorful "Hawaiian" type shirts outside the pants. I take the .45 in the pouch but leave it in the car when I go inside a business - because I have an AMT Backup .380 single action and extra mag on my belt under my shirt, which is not tucked in.

    I understand the saying "A pistol is only good for getting you back to where you left your rifle". In my case, my .380 is only good to get me back to where I left my .45!!

  15. #15
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    Default Explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by tig56 View Post
    Would you explain what lead you to the thought that a CZ-52 would eliminate the protection provided by an armored vest? Did I misunderstand your statement? You've piqued my interest, lol!! Thanks!

    Tig
    Well, first of all, take a look at this URL, if you haven't seen it before:

    http://www.theboxotruth.com/

    and specifically as related to the Cz-52, THIS URL:

    http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot29.htm

    The Cz-52 is on page 4.

    So, the 7.62X25 round penetrates a kevlar helmet when a HOT .357 magnum doesn't.

    Secondly, I have read on the Czech firearms forum that the 7.62X25 will at least penetrate a Class II armored vest. I don't remember if it will do that to a Class III vest or not.

    There was a discussion on this issue some time ago, and one of the participants, apparently, had tested this.

    He specifically carried a Cz-52 because of the drug-dealer infested areas he traveled in, some of whom wear armored vests. I suppose a TT-33 would work as well, since it uses the same ammo.

    I have no idea if he was correct in his assessment, and I don't remember all the details, but the discussion is still on Gunboards somewhere.

    Does this help?

  16. #16
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    Facing a CZ-52 or TT-33 is kinda like being shot at with a light carbine, say a 30 cal M1 carbine.

    Wolf lists their 7.62 x 25 Tok fmj ammo at 1722 f.p.s. and 560 ft. lbs. and because the bullet is light (85 gr) it cuts deep, over-penetration is a problem, putting innocent bystanders at risk. However, if the bad guy is behind cover, i.e. a wood power-line post, a car, etc. he is likely going to catch lead.

    Shooting the TT-33 is a violent experience, what keeps this flat, round-edged, smallish, pistol from flying apart always amazes me, but they are very accurate, the cartridge shoots very flat and doesn’t drop much, meaning you have excellent short and long range flexibility. The spent casings are mostly ballooned and split, a testament to what’s going on in the TT-33 chamber. The Romanian version comes with a safety, which allows for cocked and locked carry, but you want a very good holster for these, for obvious reasons.

    The Soviet military replaced the TT-33 with the comparatively anemic Makarov 9x18, (a viable CCW carry), which I’ve never understood.

    Am aware of at least one woman in east Texas who carries a TT-33.
    Was a soldier, very young, and they turned me into an old man. Sometimes in the early morning, before the sun is up, I think of fallen brothers, first with smiles...then with tears.

  17. #17
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    Default CZ-52 and TT-33 CCW

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Facing a CZ-52 or TT-33 is kinda like being shot at with a light carbine, say a 30 cal M1 carbine.
    Exactly, as far as I am concerned.

    Wolf lists their 7.62 x 25 Tok fmj ammo at 1722 f.p.s. and 560 ft. lbs. and because the bullet is light (85 gr) it cuts deep, over-penetration is a problem, putting innocent bystanders at risk.
    Again, exactly correct.

    However, if the bad guy is behind cover, i.e. a wood power-line post, a car, etc.
    Or wearing an armored vest...

    he is likely going to catch lead.
    In the discussion I mentioned above, someone had fired a CZ-52 into an old car body, firing directly into the driver's side door from about 30 feet away: the bullet penetrated the driver's side door, and exited the passenger's door, disappearing into the bushes.

    As you said, its over-penetration is a definite hazard, but can be very valuable in some cases. Still, that is one factor that makes it pretty "iffy" as a CCW. Too dangerous to the innocent.

    Shooting the TT-33 is a violent experience, what keeps this flat, round-edged, smallish, pistol from flying apart always amazes me, but they are very accurate, the cartridge shoots very flat and doesn’t drop much, meaning you have excellent short and long range flexibility.
    I have not shot one of those...yet...but sure would like to. Maybe there is a Romanian in my future.

    The spent casings are mostly ballooned and split, a testament to what’s going on in the TT-33 chamber.
    Hmmmm...I hadn't heard of this...

    The Romanian version comes with a safety,
    Which, I recently read, is quite effective and fairly easy to work.

    which allows for cocked and locked carry, but you want a very good holster for these, for obvious reasons.
    Could you elaborate on this statement about the holster, please?

    The Soviet military replaced the TT-33 with the comparatively anemic Makarov 9x18, (a viable CCW carry), which I’ve never understood.
    Me either...or why the U.S. Army went to a 9mm from the .45 ACP...

    Am aware of at least one woman in east Texas who carries a TT-33.
    My daughter carries a S&W 1917 in .45 Colt, but a TT-33 is pretty impressive. Heck, even if she didn't hit what she was aiming at, the report alone should scare any perp half to death.

    The first time I fired our Cz-52, I was amazed! It sounded like a small cannon, and at night, the muzzle flash is VERY impressive. Similar to that from an M-44 rifle.

    Thanks for the info. Much appreciated.

  18. #18
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    Confession' from a 7.62x25 addict! I tested many types of this ammo, any x25 will defeat level 11 Body Arm. If you know what to look for and can find some Czech M-48 ammo, a lot of it has a solid steel core, it will penetrate level 111 Body Ar. both sides and keep going!
    On the box of Truth Helmet test with x 25 ammo, they only used standard ammo, M-48 steel core will go through both sides!
    I ran all type of Armor piercing tests!
    A cop Buddy of mine hates this ammo, since any defeats the level 11 he always wears!

  19. #19
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    Yo Kgordon –

    Because of the power of this cartridge, really a lighter .357 Mag with more velocity, you wanna be careful with the Romys, (which is what I have). The Romy TT-33 has a robust safety, but if you get a bad one that is not installed properly it can slip on and off…not good when extracting from a holster, and even a good one does not inspire great confidence. You want a good holster that provides good concealment and smooth extraction, without tripping the safety. I have not found one yet.

    The safety on the Colt M1911 is a much better design and I trust it much more, but it is a more difficult CCW carry. You may want to look at the M1911, the recoil is much more manageable, more of a push, not like the sharp snap of a 9mm or 40 cal. And the slide a lot easier to rack than an Astra 600. I can shoot a Colt 45 all day, not an Astra 600.

    The TT-33 is flat profile, well rounded (no sharp or squared edges), is smaller than a 1911, and doesn’t print much. Despite my large hands which swallow up the short grip, and despite old injuries to my hands which have left them less than perfect, the Romy TT-33 shoots very well for me. A tack driver. I shoot mostly milsurp and the brass is always ballooning thru the body and splitting at the shoulders.

    I bought mine as a military collectible….turned out to be a great shooter, very accurate right from the first trigger pull. No learning curve at all (kinda like the Makarov and the Walther PP) but way more recoil…this one will jump out of your hand if you’re not hanging on.

    If possible, I would try one out first tho, my buddy who shoots mostly Glocks and Sigs does not shoot the TT-33 as accurately, the karma is not there for him, but he’s plenty happy with his plastic fantastics.

    Well gotta go…up to the lake…if you need pics let me know and I’ll post some.

    Hope this has been of some help.
    Was a soldier, very young, and they turned me into an old man. Sometimes in the early morning, before the sun is up, I think of fallen brothers, first with smiles...then with tears.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    “It seems that you are assuming that the strength required to work the slide on a .32 would be less than that required to work the slide on a .380. “

    The 32 ACP Walther PP & PPK is easy, the 380 Beretta M1934 is a bear

    I’ve noticed some shooters pull back the hammer before they rack the slide.

    Also the same trick for Astra 600 and 400, its much easier to then rack the slide. (i.e. With the Astra you rack it twice, once before you leave the house and again if you are carrying cold chamber).

    For Walther (if carrying hot chamber) you release the safety and pull back the hammer or pull the trigger in DA, which for an arthritic hand might be a chore.

    In any event I would not recommend the Astra 400 or 600 for arthritic hands as the recoil is also sharper than your average 9mm. Likewise less recoil with 32 ACP vs 380.

    Almost forgot the infamous Walther bite, which does not affect me.

    The tip-up barrel Beretta and Taurus do not require racking the slide.

    Geladin is right, if you can, best to try it out first.


    How does one cock the (internal) hammer on Astra 400 or 600 without retracting the
    slide?......

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    By saying "rack it twice", I think he means rack the slide with mag out at home to cock, then insert mag to carry, then rack the slide a second time to chamber round only when ready to fire. That leaves it cocked and the second rack takes less strength.

    "Less" strength for an Astra? Racking an Astra 400 requires he whose strength is as the strength of ten because his heart is pure!!!!

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    My 2 cents... Have tried everything over the years... Even have a customized Colt Commander that I had made specifically for carry... I'm a physician and I just could never wear a holster comfortably in the office without eliciting all sorts of remarks.

    Carried a Walther TPH for years, but gave it to my daughter as a Christmas present... Have a collection of Maks and Toks (incredible power, as noted above)... But, last year I finally returned to the LW Seecamp fold (agree with tig56!!!)... The pistol is compact and easy to carry everywhere - indestrcutible - safe to carry with a round in the chamber - and, it is plenty powerful for the defense purpose for which it was designed! Plus... It is made in the US my 'Merkans and it is beautifully machined... Near as I can tell it is one of the few things still made here in Amerika.

  23. #23
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    “By saying "rack it twice", I think he means rack the slide with mag out at home to cock, then insert mag to carry, then rack the slide a second time to chamber round only when ready to fire. That leaves it cocked and the second rack takes less strength.”

    Correct. But then Geladen is also of pure heart and clear mind...not unlike his granduncle Galahad.

    Thought the phrase ‘cold chamber’ explained it, apologies to members for obfuscating the obvious.

    The real culprit with the Astra 600 and 400 is that other spring, the hammer spring, which is very robust. With the final development of the Astra 400-600 series, the Condor, you can pull back the hammer manually, but then it is not as good for CCW, for the hammer is exposed and can catch on clothing…

    The Seecamp is an excellent pistol, great (perhaps unsurpassed) for very close range usage, an ideal backup, but limited if you need to take the accurate shot, i.e. shooting a bad guy holding a woman at knife point, seem to recall the Seecamp does not have sights…someone can correct me here. Prefer a small CCW gun that has more flexibility, presently checking out the Kahr 45s which allegedly print groups under an inch (3/4”) at 15 yards. Doable with the Russian Makarov which is about the same size…and weight…but a 9mm Mak is not a 45 ACP.
    Was a soldier, very young, and they turned me into an old man. Sometimes in the early morning, before the sun is up, I think of fallen brothers, first with smiles...then with tears.

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    Default Kel-tec

    I agree i've carried a Kel-tec 32 acp for 4 or 5 years and I love it.Easy to conseal in your front pocket and nobody knows you have it.Also you can get some pretty mean ammo for it.I've fired lots of rounds thru mine with never an issue versus my best friends .380 kel-tec that jam's every once in a while.I know 32 acp is not the best man stopper but like you said it will work if you give him a third eye.Just the trama from a center mass shot will make most people say Uncle.mike
    " If I tell you a rooster can pull a plow you better hook him up" :eek:

  25. #25

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    I know we are talking 32’s here, but have you tried an H&K P-7?

    It uses a gas system to retard blowback so it can get away with a much lighter spring and slide. Also the gun is not cocked till you squeeze the grip.

    Just a thought.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hagar View Post
    Beretta makes a very nice .32 with a flip up barrel. You can load it without cocking the slide. A little bigger than a Kel-tec p32, but not by much.

    You are getting a lot of advice here that is overlooking your particular problem.

    The post above addresses your problem perfectly and is a very good solution. IIRC it is called the Beretta Bear Cat in .32

    I bought one for my daugther to CCW. For the same reasons you may like this pistol

    You don't need to work the slide at all.

    As usual on any discussion on CCW there will be tons of comments on "knock down" power, minimum standards What real men carry etc. etc.

    I would personally recomend the .380 Kel Tec or Bersa Thunder, but you would have to work the slides. But the slides rack easily.
    The Beretta Bear Cat .32 has served my daughter well, but I am in going to get her a Kel Tec in .380 along with a Bersa .380 which is a little large, but an exc. CCW for certain situations it will be used also.

    It is very impt. to shoot a prospective type of gun before buying. Some smaller guns will bite you in the web of your hand. Depends on the person.

    This is a view from a practical side. Lots of shooters cannot relate to individual needs.
    Try sending a female into a gun shop asking for advice on CCW and you will see what I mean. It is the same on the internet.
    Last edited by RH7777; 04-26-2009 at 12:19 PM.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by tig56 View Post
    Would you explain what lead you to the thought that a CZ-52 would eliminate the protection provided by an armored vest? Did I misunderstand your statement? You've piqued my interest, lol!! Thanks!

    Tig
    Others have addressed this, but there is information out of Africa where political killings are endemic on the subject. When Kevlar body armor became widely available and most politicians started wearing it and managing to survive hits as a result, the hit men switched to Tokarevs (chosen over CZ-52s because of the easy concealment due to the slim profile) loaded with the hottest ammo available. Shoot the politicians several times, no problem with the vests any more and a few in the chest and belly got the desired results.

    My wife packs a TT-33, though with handloads (85 grain Hornaday XTPs) instead of full-patch. You would not want her to feel she needed to shoot you.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    My girlfriend is about 5' 2", slender, with tiny hands. She carries a Kel-tec PF9 or, depending on how she is dressed, sometimes wanting something even smaller, their P-32. Both are quite managable for her and she is skilled with either. I prefer her to carry the 9MM
    but 8 rounds of .32 in the right place would tend to discourage most attackers....We are in a Southern clime where most attackers would probably not be wearing many layers of heavy clothing for those little bullets to get through......
    Last edited by royke; 04-26-2009 at 09:38 PM.

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    I used a .32 Walther PP for years, very accurate, light on recoil and it never failed to go boom. you also might want to look at a Walther PK 380. They are about the size of a P22 chambered in 380.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kgordon View Post
    I am soliciting advice from the collective wisdom for a good choice for a .32 ACP carry piece.

    I have very bad arthritis and am having troubles getting my present carry pieces into action quickly, so I am thinking that one of the smaller .32 ACP pieces might help.

    After all, even a .22 sized third eye would ruin a perps day.

    I have thought of the CZ-70, but I hear that has issues with ammo.

    Suggestions, please?

    I just turned 67 today.

  30. #30
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    Thanks, again, people. I really appreciate your information.

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    Just get some good hollow points, but stay away from Corbon, heard for some reason those have feeding problems, and dont forget you mag. finger rest! Enjoy!


    James

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    I have a Model 1913 Sauer in .32 that is absolutely easy to rack the slide on. Sweet little shooter, but an older gun that is hard to find parts/mags/holsters for, let alone finding the pistol itself!

    I carry my 1903 Colt when I can't carry my XD. The Colt is a little stiff on the slide, but is the closest thing to ergonomic perfection I've ever run across. A fairly expensive choice, and again finding holsters can be tough, but I love mine!

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    Thumbs up CZ 50 with mag tech ammo

    excellent accurate, reliable, for $200 no complaints have had 4 or 5<><dk
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

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    Quote Originally Posted by vz58kid View Post
    ...but stay away from Corbon, heard for some reason those have feeding problems....
    Depends on the weapon and the Corbon round.

    My Taurus 745 loves 165 grain Corbon .45 DPX. The 185 grain copper Corbon slug nears maximum dimensional tolerances to match the weight of 185 grain lead core slugs where the 165gr Corbon is similar in size to the 185gr FMJ. That could be a problem with some guns. I have not tried 185gr Corbon.

    Eventhough it has less mass, I stick to the lighter round to get the higher velocity out of my short barrel for better expansion without the added stress of +P loads.

    Well, it works for me.

    (On the debate over the effectiveness of .32 as SD round--Rule One: Make sure you have a weapon with you.)

    May God Bless You With Straight Shooting
    Last edited by Tiglath-Pileser; 05-24-2009 at 02:40 AM.
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    Going back to .32 ACP, my votes are for:

    1) Seecamp
    2) Walther PP and PPK
    3) Beretta Tomcat
    4) North American Arms Guardian
    5) CZ 50 & 70
    Pa Deuce

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    real quick, on the tokarev....
    I carry a rommy sometimes with wolf h/p.....I trust it fully. I would never carry the cz52 because it would be much harder to cock in a hurry for me. That and after buying my first tokarev, I sold my cz52!

    I don't agree that the tokarev is some kind of hand cannon....Well, it is, but the recoil to me isn't. Its got a kick, but nothing anyone can't deal with. I carry mine in a bianchi x15 should holster. Works great, it very concealable.

    I have never understood the whole overpenetration argument. I would think .357 sig or .357 period, along with .44 and other rounds, would all be great overpenetraters. But no one ever talks about them....

  37. #37
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    oh, and I am looking for a good 1903 in .32 or .380. Again, the tokarev was loosly based on it, in appearance in that it is well rounded and small......

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    I can suggest the FEG AP-MBP. It's a Hungarian made derivative of the Walther PP. Similar in size and shape, it differs in having a modified safety system, different magazine folower/slide stop arrangement, and a better shaped grip frame. The frame on most of them is aluminum alloy, however a few were available in steel. The same pistol is also imported in 9x18 calibre as the PA-63. There are also .380 pistols, either factory or barrel changes.

    Some of them have a hammer spring that is too strong, and a weak recoil spring. These can both be replaced easily with Wolff Gunsprings parts.

    My FEG has proven very reliable, accurate and comfortable to shoot. With initial cost, Wolff springs, and Marschall grips it came in at just under $200.00 a year ago (they've gone up a bit since). Much better price than a Walther.

    If you look for them use a wide range search. They have been imported under a number of different names. FEG AP-MBP, AP-7, AP-7.65, AP-9, Kassnar PMK, Interarms PPH and a number of others. A smaller version, similar to the Walther PPK has been imported in various calibres as the R-61, SMC-22, SMC-7.65, SMC-380, SMC-918 and Walther PPK/E.

    There is an FEG sub forum here if you are interested.

    Robert

  39. #39
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    .32 acp? You mean also, the 7.65mm?

    I've had/have a few of these; over the years I've sold a Walther PP 7.65, a Beretta Tomcat .32, and a Seecamp .32. The Seecamp was just too small for me - it went to a fellow officer at work.

    The .32 acp, in a Winchester Silver Tip, is a reasonable up close and personal defense round. I have a Sig P230 in 7.65mm (marked that way, not .32) that is approximately the same size as a Walther PP; alas it is the only .32 acp I have now.

    I prefer the .380; a bit more bang. I own a Walther PPK, AMT Back Up, and a Colt 1908M, all chambered in .380. More often then not, I carry my Colt 1908 with 2 spare magazines. It is small enough to drop in almost any pocket (on my clothes) and under a loose fitting shirt, I have a nice shoulder holster as well.

    Now for concealibility - I've walked into our local PD with a full-sized 1911, 2 magazines, and a large folding knife concealed on my person, covered by a Tee Shirt. The Shift Supervisor didn't spot the gun nor did his undercover officers.

    The face has been changed to protect the innocent:





    Whatever you want to carry - there's a way to conceal it...

  40. #40
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    I carry a mid-war Sauer38h in .32 auto as a back-up ankle gun while on duty. It's also good for off-duty carry and it is reliable and appreciates in value each year.

  41. #41
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    Default KT has it!

    After carrying a FEG PMK380 (sweet gun); a Polish P64 (9X18) and an S&W Model 10 I have settled on the Keltec P3AT (.380). For me it has all the right things going for it : It's light, small and accurate (7-10 yards). It can be carried in cargo pants, jeans and shorts with no impression.
    I have heard all the stories about jamomatic, blah,blah but, if handled right it fires first time every time. I am over 70 and don't leave home without it. In my car I keep a Tokarev (Yugo) as my goblin gun. If you use old Polish, Romanian, Czech or Bulgarian ammo you get a Huge bang. Huge flash. Huge amount of smoke.The ammo is cheap!!! and it will easily go through the car door the goblin and his friends!!:D

    Quote Originally Posted by Kgordon View Post
    I am soliciting advice from the collective wisdom for a good choice for a .32 ACP carry piece.
    I have very bad arthritis and am having troubles getting my present carry pieces into action quickly, so I am thinking that one of the smaller .32 ACP pieces might help.
    I just turned 67 today.
    Instigator/Conservative Underground

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    zastava m70

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    I believe I'd try out a .32 snub revolver which has been expertly tuned and lightened, a caliber .32 S&W or .32 H&R mag (not all that hot). Wonderful things can be done with DA pulls by the right person.

    I'd rather have a bigger gun, but often carry a Kel-Tec .32. My other regular carry gun is a Smith and Wesson Airweight .38, but I think the recoil of that in a lightweight gun would be painful for you; a young lady friend of mine almost dropped it due to the recoil.

  44. #44

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    interesting discussion.
    my wife has rheumatoid arthritis.
    I bought her a NAA Guardian, but she couldn't rack it.
    traded for a S&W model 60 (38spl).
    she has no problem with the revolver.

  45. #45

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    I have a cz50 and it has always had issues with jhp ammo I even bought some cz70 mags and it still had issues. Enough so that I would never consider it for CCW. Another that I would not consider that many have mentioned is the tip up barrel Beretta. My biggest problem with this firearm is that it does not have an extractor. I think your best option is going to be a revolver. I myself have a Ruger SP 101 in .327 Fed Mag. The ballistics are close to the .357 Mag but the recoil to me is very light. The Ruger is slightly long with a 3.25" barrel, but both Taurus and Charter amrs make a snubby. I handled the Tuarus and it seemed much lighter than the Ruger and the trigger pull was very nice.
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati
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