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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    2

    Default French 32 Long ( 7,65 ) Ammo

    I was at a gun show today and I was sold this Ammo, 32 Long 7,65 French .The guy told me it was the same as 32Long S/W . Well it did not work. Is there some one or some place I can sell this ammo. Please help me. I paid $30.00 a box. And I have 6 Boxes It is in a Brown Box with French writing. Im guessing its Military Surplus. Please help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,741

    Default

    You can post it here ... The Trader - WTS and WTT listing board
    http://forums.gunboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=75
    Patrick
    Vive La République Française, le Lebel et le poilu
    Verdun 1916: "Ils ne Passeront pas" "On les aura!"
    Fusil d'Infanterie Modèle 1886 Modifié 1893 dit "Lebel"

    Co-Author of Banzai Special Project No. 1 Revised Edition
    The Siamese Mauser
    A Study Of Siamese / Thai Type 45 & Type 46 Long Rifles and Type 47 Carbines, Including An Overview Of Siamese/Thai Weapons 1860–2014

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    22

    Default French 32 long

    Per the "NRA Illustrated Firearms Assembly Handbook, Volume 2, page 103, Pistol Magazines, French 1935A MAS .32 Automatic", circa --sometime around 1964: "It is unfortunate that French military automatic pistols are chambered for the uncommon 7.65 mm Long pistol cartridge. Ammunition is so scarce that these interesting guns are not fully appreciated." I suspect the ammo sitation hasn't changed all that much although I still have box or two -- just wish I still had the excellent but stolen MAS 1935S they went with. In addition to being used in semi-auto pistols this round was also used in a sub-machinegun that I believe saw service with the French in Viet Nam. Hope this helps. br

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4

    Default French Longue ammo

    If you still have the ammo for the 1935SA auto pistol, I'd be very interested in it. Wow! So sorry to hear of the stolen pistol. That's like cutting a man's heart out. Please email me about the ammo, price and quantity. Thanks in advance,
    Wes

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The10Ring View Post
    I was at a gun show today and I was sold this Ammo, 32 Long 7,65 French .The guy told me it was the same as 32Long S/W . Well it did not work. Is there some one or some place I can sell this ammo. Please help me. I paid $30.00 a box. And I have 6 Boxes It is in a Brown Box with French writing. Im guessing its Military Surplus. Please help
    If you will email me I might take this ammo.
    Wes

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    The Heart of Virginia
    Posts
    501

    Lightbulb I've often heard. . . .

    That 7.65 French Long is the same as the cartridge for the "famous" Pederson Device. is that so?
    Regards, Hank
    Augment & Finagle . . . .
    "I collect therefore I accumulate"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,298

    Pederson v. 7.65 L

    Red: I think it is virtually the same round. Years ago, J Hansen had 5000 rounds of Pedersen ammo from Remington, 1918 dated. I bought a bunch and it worked in my 1935 S just fine. I do not know about the minor differences in bullet weight and interior capacity, but externally I believe that they were about the same thing...

    Dale
    "If those sweethearts won't face German bullets, Then they'll face French ones!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Cote d'Azur and Brittany France
    Posts
    1,835

    Default

    The French Army had tested in 1922 a semi auto carbine designed by John M Browning in .30 Pedersen, the caliber was appreciated, not the carbine.

    The french Army bought in 1925 from the USA 50.000 cartridges in .30 Pedersen to start testing its SMG test guns in that caliber, and a French arsenal was tooled up to take over fabrication.

    According to some French authors, The choice of shifting to the 7.65 L cartridge for handguns and SMG was dictated by several arguments:
    - the 7.65 L was as accurate and nearly as efficient as the 9 Luger up to 600M, while 25% lighter thus allowing soldiers to carry 30% extra ammo on the same weight.
    - The light recoil of the 7.65 L made possible the design of lighter handguns and SMG.
    - There was no factories in 1925 beside Germany where the 9x19 ammo could be fabricated in large quantities.
    - The USA could manufacture the 7.65 L ammo while there was no capacity for the 9x19 there.

    kelt

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the French were provided with a modified Pedersen device for a Lebel or Berthier for trials, along with a lot of ammunition.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Cote d'Azur and Brittany France
    Posts
    1,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by srinde View Post
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the French were provided with a modified Pedersen device for a Lebel or Berthier for trials, along with a lot of ammunition.
    The Lebel and Berthier shoot a 8x50R cartridge, the bore diametre is not compatible with a .30" diameter bullet.

    kelt

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,298

    I know, but they did it anyhow...

    Kelt is correct, the bore diameter is a little too big. Remington made a conversion anyhow....I saw it in the 1970's in Connecticut. They made a Berthier and a Mosin Nagant conversion as well as the US Mod 1917. These kits and rifles were from the company pattern room in Bridgeport Connecticut, J. Hanson was selling them.....(For a lot of money I might add!)

    I have no idea what inspired them to do this, but there is no telling what concepts are cooked up in the minds of proto-yuppies in the 20's.....

    I can understand why they liked the cartridge, since at the time (1920's) 9 mm was a relatively hard to find cartridge. Their reasons are quite logical and correct, but today we have no idea what it was like then...9mm was not the big deal it is today....

    Dale
    "If those sweethearts won't face German bullets, Then they'll face French ones!"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9

    Default I would also be interested in some of this ammo!

    If this really is 7.65 French long ammo, then I am also interested in some.

    Let me know by Private message or email.

    Thanks,

    louielouie2

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