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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    695

    Default Items for a storm shelter?

    Except for the once in a Blue Moon ice storm that sends everyone here to clean out the stores our real major bad weather threat in N.E. Ms. is tornado and straightline winds. We just had a concrete shelter installed that looks like it belongs on the West Wall or the DMZ in Korea as it is 9x12 I think. My question is what should a person have to take in the shelter or store in the shelter. I worry about storage in the shelter due to spoilage and extremes of cold/hot (it's over 100 right now) so I was thinking about making the items portable in sports bags/packs or a couple of 5 gallon buckets with gama seals that could be grabbed and carried.
    My list is as follows:
    cheap wally world flashlights/spare bulbs
    "advanced" military grade first aid kit (yes I have some idea how to use it)
    basic OTC medications
    toliet paper
    shop type paper towels
    bottled water
    ponchos-disposable
    multiple pairs of dry socks
    swiss army type knife/knives
    portable hand held cell phone charger
    leather gloves
    weather radio (I found the thread here useful)
    mountains of spare batteries
    Any other suggestions?
    This is not intended as the ultimate survival/BoB/SHTF stuff but something that in the event the house was damaged or blown away(it is brick but could still go) that would give immediate relief? We are planning on multiple folding chairs to be stored off the ground and maybe a card type table. At this time children are not an issue and my elderly neighbors have none so kid mterial is not an issue.
    This is not intended as a ultimate get away, the whole farm with all it's support stuff has that role, just thinking of immediate emergency stuff. Your input is always appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Food, guns/ammo
    "The NRA believes America's laws were made to be obeyed and that our Constitutional liberties are just as important today as 200 years ago. And by the way, the Constitution does not say Government shall decree the right to keep and bear arms. The Constitution says 'The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed."
    -Ronald Reagan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,802

    Default Shelter

    How long do you expect to be in the shelter on any storm occasion ? Will it be set up for possible long term ? Temperature does affect food supplies. F'rinstance , mre's last about 6 months in 100+ temps and 7 years in 50 degrees. FIVESHOT

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.
    Posts
    10,106

    Default

    I expect that the most you would need to ever stay in a shelter built for wind storm protection is overnight. With a weather radio in your house and one in each out-building on the property, including the shelter, you should be able to get to the shelter and hear the pertainible advisories and the all clear when it is issued. Forget about keeping buckets or bags in the house to bring to the shelter when needed. Supplies you think you might need in the shelter should be kept in the shelter. Just rotate items frequently to keep them fresh despite the heat. I'd say quarterly at least. Don't store anything that is gas powered because it could give off fumes. Which reminds me, get a battery powered smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector for the shelter just like the ones you should have in the house. Other than 24 to 48 hours worth of food and water and such you will want to have wrecking tools in case you have to force your way out of the shelter. These would include a saw, an axe, a sledge hammer, a pry bar, some rope, some gloves and safety goggles and perhaps a hard hat. I like the loggers hard hat that comes with a face shield if you don't already have a regular hard hat.You might be able to make it cooler in the shelter by shading the shelter under a canopy of some sort and by mounding dirt on the sunny sides of the shelter. You have a good list and a good start.
    Last edited by IamElmerJFudd; 08-04-2009 at 05:36 PM.
    Regards, Alan K.
    Available for Cabinet level positions, consultation on matters of foreign policy, weddings and bar-mitzvahs. Will work for gold or guns.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    6,634

    Default

    I don't have huricanes to worry about.. just tornados.. so I don't foresee a protracted stay in the shelter.. I do assume that the tornado will do damage to the house and scatter belongings and supplies.
    The safes in the house are hard anchored into the slab so I am assuming that they will fly away only in the most extreme worst case.

    Two weeks food and water, enchanced and supplemented first aid kit.. Tool kit tailored to rehabing the main house with empahsis on the roof ( Framing Hammers, Saws general carpentry gear manual braces and bits, axes shovels all hand tools nothing powered ect, with hardware for reconstruction, Suffcient Blue tarp to temp roof the main house with tie downs Try Harbor Freight for the tarps best prices I deally you will need 1x2 batting to secure it.. but I don't have room so I have rope and anchors,... 4 room tent and propane cooking equipment ( my propane tank is buried as are most of the lines and I have supplemental gas outlets on the line you will want some way to cap off or isolate a broken line to the house) and adapters in the storm shelter. Chem toilet and pop up toliet shelter.. solar shower each person has a duffle with work clothes sleeping bag confort items and work boots Falshlights and other personal survival.eating utinsels type stuff, Batteries and chargers, 90 watts of portable PV panels 110 amp battery inverter and controler and associated cables

    And escape gear incase something drops on the door.

    few years back they had this with 6 panels instead of 4 but same stuff
    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...2703_200352703

    Key peice of escape gear

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...2677_200332677 Key feature long stroke so you can raise the door enough to exit without doing it in stages. you will also need a steel hard plate so you don't bust thru the shelter floor to put under it and a premade extension to reach from the jack in the lowest position to the door .. 3 tons should lift a car or pick-up .. I have cut back the trees but sometimes tornado's supply their own trees.. get a bigger jack if you feel the need.

    You shouldn't be getting such high temps in an underground shelter.. mine doesn't freeze and doesn't overheat with the door closed.

    I have similar products to this arround my house plugged in but I rotate the house ones with two I keep in the storm shelter every couple of months dount the still make the ones I have but similar specs 4 amp/h battery mines florecent high low output switch.. but you do have to rotate them every couple months. they do run down if not kept charged.
    http://www.exitlightco.com/product/EL-3N1.html

    I have am/fm/shortwave that takes an external attenna and an external attenna for rigging post tornado.

    Kids have comfortpacks toys and goodies for grandkids stashed.. they live just doors away so everybody knows to come to the shelter and they have their own keys.

    Having only tornado's I can afford a SRO situation for 6 adults with kids stacked on the duffle bags.. dogs ( breaks my heart are on their own) My shelter is at the high point of my back yard and is the sloped door type and I am not in a flood area, but you never know so drainage is deliberately excelent immedately arround it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    BFK
    Posts
    884

    Default

    Tornados pass thru, and are over in a few minutes.....the damage path is relatively small (comparing to a hurricane). The widest past his about a mile.

    I have heard the stories of when the town next to us was hit....I was within a mile of one this past weekend. Tornados are not a situation where all society breaks down. They are not a situation where you are in the storm for days either. The most I can see being in a shelter is an hour or so.

    Here would be my list, not perfectly, but close to the order of importance.

    First, wear shoes when you go into the shelter. After the storm, there will be debris everywhere.

    Weather radio (I have wind up, but if not wind up, battery powered, with extra batteries) (you need to know where the storm is, and when it is clear to come out)

    Whistle (if you are buried in debris, helps people find you)

    Flash light and extra batteries.

    Medical supplies (first aid, stocked for cuts or similar injuries)




    At least a weather radio...personally, I like a police scanner, because the police around her also do the spotting. With a scanner, I am hearing everything in real time. I use both a police scanner and weather radio. TV is worthless. They get their information from the county emergency office, who is relaying and digesting the info they received from the spotters (why not have a scanner, and hear first hand?). There is often a 3-5 minute lag here for TV. If your lap top is wireless, and your shelter is in range of your modem, you can pull up radar from that. If you lose power, and internet, 1, your tv won't work either and 2, most likely, you probably already were hit, and you already know where the storm was.

    Guns...I would say are a no no...there is not much looting after a tornado. Of course, I am in a small town in KS. The police are on the scene minutes after the tornado hit. They have been watching the storm, and already have plans on what to do. Again, law and order do not break down. Part of the city is damaged, but people do not react like Katrina.

    I was listening to the highway patrol when Greensburg, KS was hit. The whole down was destroyed. The Highway Patrol was aware after it hit, and broadcast that all towers were down in Kiowa County, KS. They immediately jumped in, set up mobile communication, and was in control of the situation within 30 minutes.

    Two things I forgot....Blankets, to cover yourself to help protect against debris, and general comfort. Also useful if others are in shock. and Toys for kids. Nothing more trying on the nerves than a scared kid screaming for a hour.
    Last edited by Ben-in-KS; 06-27-2009 at 11:58 PM. Reason: Add two more things.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    /Free^State\
    Posts
    17,741

    Lightbulb kinetic flash lights shake, save batteries for the short wave.

    ham, police, air bands.
    money stash, ATM, stores used cash, if are down for weeks, like around here Wva during two-- hundred year floods in 9 months.
    BOTTLES of BLEACH
    kerosene, gallons. for lamp back ups.
    5 bags self lighting charcoal, hibachi to cook the meat that's defrosting in the freezer, refrigerator of the house.:eek:
    salt lots to put on that meat after cooked to preserve it till washed off and eaten.
    old single barrel shotgun, two boxes number 4# shells, for
    varmints, stray starving maybe hurt animals. two legged too.
    even if you don't think you need it its for family peace of mind.:cool:
    just a few things that we had / got during the floods <><dk
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 08-04-2009 at 04:26 PM.
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    /Free^State\
    Posts
    17,741

    Lightbulb run an antenna shielded cable all the way up the air shaft

    at the end not touching metal let the antennas shielded hang in the air shaft as close to outside as possible,
    or what i would do is drill hole high in the base of the vent shaft bring line outside to a simple antenna apx 3 feet high. in a secure location. THERMOMETER/ BAROMETER WITH OUTSIDE SENSOR. <>< dk
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 08-04-2009 at 07:13 PM.
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    562

    Default

    damn after all of these lists may not be any room in storm cellar for people
    when i was a kid in northern oklahoma we had cots or old bunk beds, some magazines/books to pass time deck of cards, checkers game, canned jars of food because that was where such things were stored, blankets, pillows, flashlights. when the weather threatened or radio warned of tornados we gathered some other things and headed into the storm cellar. this was on a farm in the 1950s. if the barn/shop with all the tools and tractors got blowed away there were neighbors that wouldn't get blowed away that would come help out
    is the temperature inside the cellar 100F? that seems very high for a cellar buried in the earth. something is wrong i would say.
    i would say that overnight will probably be the length of your stay in event of tornados

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Flint, MI. America's Jewel
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    .
    Last edited by Billofthenorth2; 08-24-2009 at 09:13 AM.
    The surplus of verbiage oft times consummates in a loss of perspicacity!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TC2xTCb_GU

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    562

    Default

    prob good idea to have a bucket w/ a toilet seat and a trashbag in there and paper. we also had a transistor radio(remember those?)later in the 60s'.

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