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Thread: CZ-82 vs CZ-83

  1. #1
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    Default CZ-82 vs CZ-83

    Hello forum.

    I am wondering if anyone in the Membership here has both CZ-82 and CZ-83, and am also curious as to how they rate and compare them.

    Recently I briefly held each in a pawn/gun shop. Heavy but they fit my hand well. They look and feel the same, except that the CZ-83 is new. Each pistol will receive the other's cartridge holder. But I am not sure they are really interchangeable as they use slightly different rounds.

    The CZ-82 is about $220. It looks fairly okay, except for some wavy appearance to the paint on the slide's sides.

    The CZ-83 is about $460. And it appears to be new. It looks to have been blued.

    If "pretty" isn't so important to me, are these weapons at parity? Or is the new one significantly better for some not-so-obvious reason?

    Is there any advantage or disadvantage to a pistol being SA/DA capable? I see others which don't do both.

    Is the lack of a de-cocker a major issue?

    Has anyone put a laser on one of these?

    Thanks for reading this.
    Last edited by hankosaurus; 07-12-2009 at 09:55 PM. Reason: grammar
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

  2. #2

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    The CZ-82 (actual designation vz 82) and the CZ-83 are for all intents and purposes the same gun with a few caveats:

    1.) The CZ-82 was produced only in 9x18 Makarov caliber. The CZ-83 was produced in 9x18 Mak and .380 ACP (i.e. 9x17). The 9x18 Mak caliber is slightly more powerful than the .380 ACP, however on the other hand there is a somewhat wider range of western production ammo for the .380. This is slowly changing however as the 9x18 is becoming somewhat more popular in the U.S..

    2.) As you have noticed, the CZ-83 was produced in a higher quality finish. The CZ-82 was only produced in a black polymer finish and was intended for Czech police and military. The CZ-83 was produced for the commerical market and was made in a variety of finishes (blued, nickel, polymer, ).

    3.) The trigger guards are slightly different. The CZ-82 trigger guard was designed to accomodate a gloved hand and is therefore slightly enlongated.

    I would say that in excess of 90% of the parts are interchangeable between the two pistols. As stated, the trigger guards are slightly different and I believe the slide stop springs are different (Norm Sutton can give you the details on that).

    As to your other questions, here are my opinions:

    1.) I don't view the absence of a decocker as an issue. Personally I've never gotten used to trusting a decocker to drop the hammer without firing a round. Some decockers can malfunction due to component wear, therefore I've always had the habit of manually dropping the hammer with my thumb.

    2.) SA/DA means that the gun can be carried in Condition 1 (Cocked and Locked) and Condition 2 (round chambered, hammer down). The advantage of the SA/DA mechanism is that in condition 2 you don't have to manually cock the hammer with your thumb, instead you can simply pull the trigger which will cock the hammer and then fire the weapon. After the first round is fired the gun will cycle normally with the hammer getting set in the cocked position and the end of each cycle. Many people perfer to carry in condition 2 as they consider it to be safer (though of course opinions vary on this point).
    Last edited by General Disarray; 07-05-2009 at 02:51 PM.

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    General Disarray,

    Thank you for your thoughtfully constructed, thorough reply to my questions. Judging from your remarks, I am inclined to think that a vz 82 would be a better price performer for my purposes. The vz 83 is just prettier, but pretty isn't what I would buy it for. 9X18 Makarov ammo is readily available here at fair prices, so that's not a problem.

    I also note that the vz 82 has gotten good reports from the Members here who have spoken about them.

    Your idea about the decocker is a good point which I had not thought about. I probably would do the same as you for fear that it might fail in its intended purpose with serious consequences. I can probably accomplish the same safety feature by letting my thumb block the hammer, rolling it out of the way slowly as the hammer closes.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    The CZ-83 was also made in .32acp or 7.65mm.
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  5. #5

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    On the decocker, remember that if you are concerned about the safety of using your thumb to drop the hammer with a round chambered, you can always eject the magazine and and cycle the slide and eject the round. This is the proper way to safe the pistol if a round is chambered. Of course, if your intention is to carry condition 2 then this is not an option as you specifically intend to drop the hammer on a chambered round.

    One thing about the CZ-82/83 is that both use an "inertial" firing pin system. The firing pin does not rest on the chambered round. In fact, if you manually depress the firing pin with your finger with a round chambered you will discover that it is not long enough to reach the primer with the head of the firing pin flush with the firing pin stop. Instead, the firing pin (which is spring loaded so as to opposed being pressed) must be hit with sufficient force by the hammer so as to "launch" it against the primer of the chambered round. As an additional safety feature, there is a hammer block which is also spring loaded against the direction of the falling hammer. The result is that it pretty much takes a fully cocked hammer falling unimpeded to strike the firing pin with enough force to cause it to hit the primer with sufficient energy to cause it to detonate.

    While we never say never and we don't want to depend on these safety features from saving us from an uncontrolled manual decock, it is pretty unlikely that if your thumb were to slip from the hammer during a decock process that it would actually result in a fired round, unless it slipped at the very beginning while the hammer was fully back. Of course, whether manually decocking or using a built in decocker, we always point the weapon in a safe direction while performing a decock.

    As you have surmised, if you don't care about astheticts (which won't actually be that bad if you find an lightly used CZ-82) and all you care about is functionallity, the CZ-82 is an excellent buy. If you can handle one in a gun store, are happy with it's operation and price I would go for it. If you can't find a good condition example in your local gunstore you might consider one of the online source. For instance, I recently bought a CZ-82 from CDNN which was listed as being in excellent/unissued condition. Price was $189 (pistol + 1 mag) plus around $20 shipping. I also bought an extra magazine for $29.99. When received the pistol was found to be exactly as described. I suspect my gun was never issued. After a complete take down I am convinced that the only rounds fired throuh it were the factory proof rounds. Of couse, you would have to have the gun shipped to a local FFL 01 license holder to do the transfer. Most gun stores will do this for around $20.

    BTW, if you get a good condition CZ-82 with the large leather issued holster you might want to be aware of the fact that where these holsters store an extra magazine, the bottom of the magazine is positioned right below the trigger guard. You will find that most CZ-82's that were issued and carried in these holsters will have some significant finish scratches right below the trigger guard. This is a result of the bottom of the extra magazine rubbing up against this spot on the gun. If your's isn't scratched up in this area you might not want to use the issued holster, or at least not stow the extra magazine in it. The issue holster is pretty big and old fashioned looking by western standards, so most don't use it. If you really liked it though the best fix would be to sew in a piece of leather as a divider between the extra magazine and the pistol.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bingo View Post
    The CZ-83 was also made in .32acp or 7.65mm.
    That's true, though they are much more rare to find.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by General Disarray View Post
    On the decocker, remember that if you are concerned about the safety of using your thumb to drop the hammer with a round chambered, you can always eject the magazine and and cycle the slide and eject the round. This is the proper way to safe the pistol if a round is chambered. Of course, if your intention is to carry condition 2 then this is not an option as you specifically intend to drop the hammer on a chambered round.
    Good points. I like the idea of a round in the chamber and the hammer at rest while carrying. The CZ-82 seems to be pretty smooth and manageable when it is lifting the hammer back while the trigger is being pulled. I confess I do not understand the ramifications of the alternate view of carrying with the hammer cocked and locked. Maybe it's the "locked" part that I don't trust. I basically don't trust automatic anything as much as manual the same thing.

    One thing about the CZ-82/83 is that both use an "inertial" firing pin system. The firing pin does not rest on the chambered round. In fact, if you manually depress the firing pin with your finger with a round chambered you will discover that it is not long enough to reach the primer with the head of the firing pin flush with the firing pin stop. Instead, the firing pin (which is spring loaded so as to opposed being pressed) must be hit with sufficient force by the hammer so as to "launch" it against the primer of the chambered round. As an additional safety feature, there is a hammer block which is also spring loaded against the direction of the falling hammer. The result is that it pretty much takes a fully cocked hammer falling unimpeded to strike the firing pin with enough force to cause it to hit the primer with sufficient energy to cause it to detonate.
    Seems like pretty clever engineering. Sounds like it probably would not go off if dropped. Good.

    While we never say never and we don't want to depend on these safety features from saving us from an uncontrolled manual decock, it is pretty unlikely that if your thumb were to slip from the hammer during a decock process that it would actually result in a fired round, unless it slipped at the very beginning while the hammer was fully back. Of course, whether manually decocking or using a built in decocker, we always point the weapon in a safe direction while performing a decock.
    Yes, I remember from high school ROTC rifle team, never ever point a weapon at anything living unless that is the intended target. All weapons are presumed loaded and deadly, especially the empty ones.

    As you have surmised, if you don't care about astheticts (which won't actually be that bad if you find an lightly used CZ-82) and all you care about is functionallity, the CZ-82 is an excellent buy. If you can handle one in a gun store, are happy with it's operation and price I would go for it.
    I think that's the direction I'm headed now. Thanks for the guidance.

    If you can't find a good condition example in your local gunstore you might consider one of the online source. For instance, I recently bought a CZ-82 from CDNN which was listed as being in excellent/unissued condition. Price was $189 (pistol + 1 mag) plus around $20 shipping. I also bought an extra magazine for $29.99. When received the pistol was found to be exactly as described. I suspect my gun was never issued. After a complete take down I am convinced that the only rounds fired through it were the factory proof rounds. Of couse, you would have to have the gun shipped to a local FFL 01 license holder to do the transfer. Most gun stores will do this for around $20.
    Looks like a great find you came up with. I will be a bit pickier now that I know this. The sample I handled costs a bit more, and as I mentioned, did have some ripple or something in the paint on the slide's sides. I will see if I can figure out that FFL 01 angle.

    BTW, if you get a good condition CZ-82 with the large leather issued holster you might want to be aware of the fact that where these holsters store an extra magazine, the bottom of the magazine is positioned right below the trigger guard. You will find that most CZ-82's that were issued and carried in these holsters will have some significant finish scratches right below the trigger guard. This is a result of the bottom of the extra magazine rubbing up against this spot on the gun. If your's isn't scratched up in this area you might not want to use the issued holster, or at least not stow the extra magazine in it. The issue holster is pretty big and old fashioned looking by western standards, so most don't use it. If you really liked it though the best fix would be to sew in a piece of leather as a divider between the extra magazine and the pistol.
    I want to believe that those holsters are well designed for the purpose, but I must say I think they do have a double dose of ugly.
    Last edited by hankosaurus; 07-05-2009 at 11:36 PM. Reason: typo + add
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    One more note about manually decocking the hammer with a round chambered.....

    The trigger on the cz 82/83 has an automatic safety built in which does not allow the hammer to touch the firing pin unless the trigger is being pulled.

    What I do is pull the trigger just enough to release the hammer (while holding it with my thumb) then immediately release the trigger and let the hammer down slowly. using this method, there is only a fraction of a second before I release the trigger when the auto safety wont stop the gun from firing. I've never had a negligent discharge, and always carry "condition 2".

    Also, regarding the finish on the 82's.... They can sometimes be a little rough, mostly from holster wear. I chose to refinish mine with a much better, self-lubricating, coating than they originally came with. cost about $30-40 in materials and a few hours, but is much improved.
    I have a thread with before and after pics posted on the makarov forum here..... http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=117000
    Last edited by mychoads; 07-06-2009 at 12:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mychoads View Post
    One more note about manually decocking the hammer with a round chambered.....

    The trigger on the cz 82/83 has an automatic safety built in which does not allow the hammer to touch the firing pin unless the trigger is being pulled.
    That's very good to know.

    What I do is pull the trigger just enough to release the hammer (while holding it with my thumb) then immediately release the trigger and let the hammer down slowly. using this method, there is only a fraction of a second before I release the trigger when the auto safety wont stop the gun from firing. I've never had a negligent discharge, and always carry "condition 2".
    Thanks for that info. I think that the de-cocking concern is a non-issue now. I can manage that no problem.

    Also, regarding the finish on the 82's.... They can sometimes be a little rough, mostly from holster wear. I chose to refinish mine with a much better, self-lubricating, coating than they originally came with. cost about $30-40 in materials and a few hours, but is much improved.
    I have a thread with before and after pics posted on the makarov forum here..... http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=117000
    I looked at those images and read the thread. Very impressive. I don't know if I have the courage to do the take-down and build-up that you did. I fear that I would get lost, or maybe some part would be lost or get positioned wrongly in re-assembly. I'm tempted to buy some sort of sandblasting tool like that and try my hand at some sacrifical project before doing anything as serious as refinishing a vz 82.

    Thanks a million for your insight.

    Happy day.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

  10. #10

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    Just to add to what mychoads said, in the NRA pistol safety class we were taught to lay the other thumb across the frame, in front of the hammer while doing that maneuver. That way, if the thumb that's on the hammer slips for any reason, the hammer will fall on the "safety" thumb, and not on the firing pin. Maybe a minor "ouch," but no "bang."

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    You have gotten some EXCELLENT advice. I have the 82 and 83 in front of me and have been following the advice.
    I am sleepy and may have missed an explanation of the differences in the inside of the barrels.....83 is rifled and 82 is polygonal.....no grooves. A surprise to many.
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    I stripped and cold blued my slide only,added new grips and a fiber optic front sight to my CZ-82. Came out pretty decent.

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    I have the 82 and 83 in .380 and .32 caliber. You can interchange magazines between .380 and 9x18 but the .32 magazine has a crease down both sides so it can only be used for .32. The 83 came in 9x18, .380, and .32 but the .380 is by far the most common and right now the 82 is the better bargain.

    If you get one of these pistols there is one thing you need to watch out for when you are cleaning it. When the trigger gaurd is pulled down and the grips are off it is possible for the trigger gaurd pivot pin to fall out if you tilt the gun. If it falls out it will lead to other problems with the bolt hold open spring. You can prevent this by putting the trigger gaurd back up and the pin will stay put or leave the grips on while the trigger gaurd is down.

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    Jackinil, are those Marschal grips? What kind of wood are they? Very nice!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackinil View Post
    I stripped and cold blued my slide only,added new grips and a fiber optic front sight to my CZ-82. Came out pretty decent.
    Very nicely done. Please tell me about "cold blueing." Is that something a firearms novice with a bit of mechanical prowess can do, or is that something one would want to farm out to an expert? What is the cost of doing that?

    Thanks for sharing your results.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    Hello candr44.

    I have the 82 and 83 in .380 and .32 caliber. You can interchange magazines between .380 and 9x18, but the .32 magazine has a crease down both sides so it can only be used for .32. The 83 came in 9x18, .380, and .32 but the .380 is by far the most common and right now the 82 is the better bargain.
    Thanks for that info. I'm leaning very strongly in the direction of the CZ-82 (vz 82) in 9X18 Makarov. The ammunition is readily available here. I noticed that the CZ-83/.380 magazine fit right into the CZ-82/Makarov. It's good to know that it will support both as long as those creases for .32 are not there.

    ...If you get one of these pistols there is one thing you need to watch out for when you are cleaning it. When the trigger gaurd is pulled down and the grips are off it is possible for the trigger gaurd pivot pin to fall out if you tilt the gun. If it falls out it will lead to other problems with the bolt hold open spring. You can prevent this by putting the trigger gaurd back up and the pin will stay put or leave the grips on while the trigger gaurd is down.
    I will remember to keep the handles on when cleaning it. And especially so until I am familiar with its mechanicals. Thanks again.

    Happy day.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Mr Mitch View Post
    You have gotten some EXCELLENT advice. I have the 82 and 83 in front of me and have been following the advice.
    I am sleepy and may have missed an explanation of the differences in the inside of the barrels.....83 is rifled and 82 is polygonal.....no grooves. A surprise to many.
    Thank you, Mr. Mitch.

    I did not notice the rifling in the .380 CZ-83. Guess I just wasn't paying attention. I am aware of the "polygonal" rifling in the CZ-82. Is there any reason to believe that either is better than the other? Are there any special concerns with respect to selecting proper ammunition for pistols having the polygonal rifling?
    Last edited by hankosaurus; 07-11-2009 at 11:13 PM. Reason: grammar + add
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by hankosaurus View Post
    Thank you, Mr. Mitch.

    I did not notice the rifling in the .380 CZ-83. Guess I just wasn't paying attention. I am aware of the "polygonal" rifling in the CZ-82. Is there any reason to believe that either is better than the other? Are there any special concerns with respect to selecting proper ammunition for pistols having the polygonal rifling?
    I had an 83 in 9x18 .Had the same polygonal "smoothbore" as my 82(9x18).both very accurate weapons.pretty much the same weapon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Karang View Post
    I had an 83 in 9x18 .Had the same polygonal "smoothbore" as my 82(9x18).both very accurate weapons.pretty much the same weapon.
    I think the only difference between an 82 and an 83 in 9x18 is the finish and the shape of the trigger guard.

  20. #20
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    There are some slight physical differences between the two.
    The 83 pictured is in 9x18 Makarov caliber.
    The barrels appear to be the same polyagonal rifling.
    Externally, the trigger guard shape, type of screws used in the grips, the front sights and type of material used in the sights. The 83 has low-light phosphprous (I'm guessing on that, it does glow green when light is applied directly to the sights).
    The magazine release buttons are shaped differently as well, but you can encounter that in various years of manufacture of the 82's as well.
    Internally, the only thing that I can find is that the slide release spring is set up differently in the 83. It is less apt to fall out at the most inopportune time like some of the 82's do.
    Magazines appear to be the same, although there are some out there that have the large alloy floorplates which give a little more purchase on the grip for larger hands (and looks better too, IMO).

  21. #21

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    The grips were from a guy on Gunbroker,not Marchal. As for "cold bluing" the slide,I just used a heavy duty stripper first,rinsed well and steel wooled[0000],degreased with acetone and applied Birchwood Casey Bluing solution.Applied the bluing three times,rinsing and degreasing in between.

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    Quote Originally Posted by toivo View Post
    I think the only difference between an 82 and an 83 in 9x18 is the finish and the shape of the trigger guard.
    Thanks, toivo.

    I did notice that difference on the trigger guard. The front of it looks as though it is part of the grip strategy for shooting. I wonder if that makes it more stable in aiming, shooting, and follow through. I understand that the big fingerholes are for gloves. I like that.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackinil View Post
    The grips were from a guy on Gunbroker,not Marchal. As for "cold bluing" the slide,I just used a heavy duty stripper first,rinsed well and steel wooled[0000],degreased with acetone and applied Birchwood Casey Bluing solution.Applied the bluing three times,rinsing and degreasing in between.
    Thanks for the information, jackinil. I take it that even I could do it, based on your description. I had been wondering if blueing was some complicated operation that involved special machinery and processes beyond the practical reach of a novice wanting to fix up one pistol or rifle.
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by WVchuck View Post
    There are some slight physical differences between the two.
    The 83 pictured is in 9x18 Makarov caliber.
    The barrels appear to be the same polyagonal rifling.
    Externally, the trigger guard shape, type of screws used in the grips, the front sights and type of material used in the sights. The 83 has low-light phosphprous (I'm guessing on that, it does glow green when light is applied directly to the sights).
    The magazine release buttons are shaped differently as well, but you can encounter that in various years of manufacture of the 82's as well.
    Internally, the only thing that I can find is that the slide release spring is set up differently in the 83. It is less apt to fall out at the most inopportune time like some of the 82's do.
    Magazines appear to be the same, although there are some out there that have the large alloy floorplates which give a little more purchase on the grip for larger hands (and looks better too, IMO).
    Thanks, Chuck, for the comparative description and especially for sharing the side by side photographs too.

    I assume that you had one of these handsome pistols and then bought the other one also. And I understand that both are chambered for 9X18 Makarov. If so, what was your motivation in buying the second one? Which one was second? Is either a favorite, and if so why?

    Many thanks to everyone who has so patiently answered my questions. I'm looking forward to owning a CZ-82.
    Last edited by hankosaurus; 07-12-2009 at 10:33 PM. Reason: grammar
    Henry
    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." -- Pericles (430 B.C.)

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    I picked up the 82 first and liked it well enough to want an 83 in the same caliber.
    The new one came with three magazines too. It was a group buy that makarov.com had several years ago.
    The motivation for the 83 was to get a new, unfired piece with a blued finish.
    As far as looks go, the blued metal beats the painted finish hands down.
    Now to find one in .32ACP.
    The CZ-82 is one of, if not the best buy going in the handgun market and has been ever since the price on them dropped below $200 for a complete package of pistol, two mags, cleaning rod and holster.
    I just wish I'd taken one of the ones with the camo holsters as well as the leather ones when I had the choice. Now there's a black leather "normal" looking holster that is available for them that I would like to pick up.

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    Default CZ 82

    I have 2 of these CZ 82's. :D I took both of them and cleaned away the paint and did a very nice Blueing on them.:cool: The 12 round mags are great and I have 4 each for both weapons. They are extremely accurate and a lot of fun to shoot. I picked up nylon holsters for them with the magazine holders. For the price and availability of ammo, you can not beat these.:D

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    Between the two right now I'd go for the 82. They are nearly the same pistol, save that 9x18 can be had for ten dollars for fifty rounds and if you find 9x17 it's well over twenty dollars a box. "Defense" load .380 was going for over $30 at the MVACA gun show this weekend. Hollow point 9x18's were going for $11.00 a box.

    Essentially these are the same pistol just one is 9x18 and one is 9x17 (.380 ACP). But one costs nearly $200 less and ammunition is half as much. Most 82's are also a wreck in terms of finish and overall beauty, but if your looking for function not flash, then the 82 is the way to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammerhead6814 View Post
    Between the two right now I'd go for the 82. They are nearly the same pistol, save that 9x18 can be had for ten dollars for fifty rounds and if you find 9x17 it's well over twenty dollars a box. "Defense" load .380 was going for over $30 at the MVACA gun show this weekend. Hollow point 9x18's were going for $11.00 a box.

    Essentially these are the same pistol just one is 9x18 and one is 9x17 (.380 ACP). But one costs nearly $200 less and ammunition is half as much. Most 82's are also a wreck in terms of finish and overall beauty, but if your looking for function not flash, then the 82 is the way to go.
    Thank you Hammerhead.

    I am clear now that the 9x18 CZ-82 will be the choice. It just makes way too much sense in terms of price and performance. I did not know about the price differential on ammo, but that is icing on the cake as far as I am concerned.

    Last edited by hankosaurus; 07-26-2009 at 12:02 AM. Reason: typo fix
    Henry
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    I own both the 82 and 83, but all of mine are relatively early guns, purchased in the 90s.

    The trigger guards on early guns are identical; The styilized "finger grip" guard was applied to the CZ 83's fairly recently. Personally, I don't like it.

    Magazines in .380 and 9x18 are identical, the only difference being that, due to the slightly larger size of the 9x18 round, the mags will accept 13 rds of .380 and only 12 of the 9x18.

    My first 82 was a NIB pistol purchased out of Canada as a one time purchase approved by BATF. It was the same price as the .380's and .32's, but was actual unissued Czech military surplus that CZ apparently chose to dump on the market. (Not sure if it was the result of a contract overrun or what.) It has the advantage of no import marks, but also the disadvantage of not being able to be sold. (One of the conditions of importation.)

    I haven't checked to see the differences in the retaining spring mentioned above, but I have never had any issues with parts "falling out."

  30. #30
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    Great info here! But was suprised nobody mentioned the CZ-83 does not have the eyelet on bottem for the Lanyard!

  31. #31
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vz58kid View Post
    Great info here! But was suprised nobody mentioned the CZ-83 does not have the eyelet on bottem for the Lanyard!
    Actually, some of the very early CZ 83's do have the eyelet for the lanyard, probably the result of using up existing supplies of parts.

  32. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackinil View Post
    I stripped and cold blued my slide only,added new grips and a fiber optic front sight to my CZ-82. Came out pretty decent.
    Jackinil

    Where did you get a fiber optic front sight? Is it sold for a different gun?

    Thanks
    MLN

  33. #33
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    Default

    :D Very nice!

  34. #34
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    Of couse, you would have to have the gun shipped to a local FFL 01 license holder to do the transfer.
    CZ 82's are considered C&R eligible and can go directly to a Class 03 (C&R) licensee.

  35. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by dondone View Post
    CZ 82's are considered C&R eligible and can go directly to a Class 03 (C&R) licensee.
    Depends on your state. Here in NY, all handguns have to be transferred through an FFL 01, even C&R.

  36. #36
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    Default Finish on CZ's

    The 82's were originally for police and military, and with Soviet block influence it shows what seems to me a typical Russian style paint coating... slap it on thick enough, you won't have to worry about it! :D

    The 83's were the commercial model, "better" finishes and a choice in calibers.

    What I love about the 82 is they remind me almost of the Ruger 10/22 which is the best $200 rifle you can spend $3,000 on!

    "Yeah the pistol cost me $200, pretty good eh? Then I sent it off had it stripped and refinished for $150. and decided it needed nice grips to go with the finish job. Yeah $62. +S&H, pretty good eh?
    Needed new sights, about $100, but I can see them in a coal mine! And a holster, boy a good one is hard to find, so I had this custom made for $200. Yeah this pistol is a bargain. You know, I think I might get another one. Or two..."

    Welcome to the club.... :D

    Oh yeah, almost forgot, complete take down, yeah there's a few parts, but putting it back together again? Think Rubick's Cube...
    nvwardog
    Last edited by NvWardog; 10-09-2009 at 12:09 AM.
    Battle Born

    Party Like It's 1773

    I like to poke Badgers with sporks...:eek:



  37. #37
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    Default

    I have waited over 30+ years to get a 9mm pistol.

    After seeing my very first CZ pistol in 9mm shoot so great(CZ85DB) for just $280 used like new in the box with papers I went in search of more CZ's. I found two more CZ83's in the used case like new in 380acp and in 9mm mak. for just $229 & $220. I grabbed both. Then the CZ82 was offered in Very good condition for $189 so i got that one too. Soon after aim offered the CZ82 in excellent condition and its in the same like new condition as my CZ83's. My cz82 in very good condition is my new carry gun.

    My point is check out the used handgun case in your local pawn and gun shops. Around my area most of these aren't shot or shot very little and priced very affordable too.

    On my last browsing trip i notice the new cz's hitting $500 to $600 lately too. The prices on these surely have gone up on this awesome pistol.

    I hope to find the CZ83's in 32acp soon and a CZ75 that would round out my cz collection.
    Are you ready for 12-21-2012?? Lets pray its the second comming of Christ and not the end like so many predict.

  38. #38
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    Default no de-cocker is no big deal

    No de-cocker isn't too big a deal since the hammer cannot strike the pin if the trigger isn't being pulled. Real easy to drop the hammer with the thumb.
    "That's what governments are for ... get in a man's way." - Malcolm Reynolds, Firefly

  39. #39
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    Default

    Hello,

    I am a new member of this forum but have "lurked" here for some years. I am not new to CZ's and I see several posts in this thread that indicate the OP has received reliable information.

    However, I am concerned that no one warned Hankosaurus " CZ's are Addictive " its hard to stop with one - since most models are bargains for people who like to shoot more than a "little bit" . They just run and run and are fun to upgrade.

    Regards,


  40. #40
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    Dec 2008
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    Ashland, Ky.
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    Default

    I hear a lot of talk about the CZ-83 being a commercial model. However I bought a near mint CZ-83 in .380 from Cole Distributing at the Knob Creek show earlier this month. These were surplus guns which were actually imported by Cole Distributing and I was told the source was Israel. So they must be selling some of these pistols for service use. My sample is a 1990 model in great condition and has the old style rounded trigger guard. Does anyone here have any info on the CZ-83 being used in Israel?

  41. #41
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    Default CZ-82

    I don't worry about the ugly chipped flaky finish on my CZ-82......these were military and police contract sidearms, and also one more "middle finger" to the hated Soviets as the Czechs have always resisted adopting Soviet weapons, and although were forced to use the Soviet ammunition they designed their own weapons. Maybe very loosely based on the Makarov the CZ-82 is a unique design and I think one of CZ's finest. A compact and easy to carry sidearm, it was no doubt designed in the same vein as the Makarov as a mid-sized universal pistol that the military, uniformed police, and "special" units like plainclothes police and whatever the Czech equivalent of the KGB was could all use, without having to worry about full-sized and compact duty pistols. I would like to add 1 or 2 more CZ-82's before the prices start to climb and/or supplies start drying up as people start realizing they are a good pistol with available ammo. If I never get around to adding another one, I feel my one and only 82 will last probably longer than me, these guns are built to last. I think the next big gun show I go to will likely yield me another 82, and possibly another 52. My 82 is pure "shooter grade" and I would like to add a nicer one that's close to unissued.

    My 82 has the usual chips by the trigger guard from the mag floorplate knocking against it, but it shows that it was carried and looks to be shot very little. I chose a piece that was less than minty so I could shoot it a lot and not worry about damaging any of the finish, most of the wear points have already been taken down to the white anyway.

    I have wanted a CZ-83 in .32 for a while, I love .32 auto's and a bigger pistol like the 83 in .32 I think would be an outstanding shooter. Overbuilt for hot 9x18 it would make for a very durable gun in .32 ACP.

    The brown holsters may seem ugly, but they have that "ugly but purely functional" look that is 100% East Bloc. Also, I'm sure you all know the "ugly" holsters are also ambidextrous, the pistol and mag can be flip-flopped for use by a lefty. It seems the Czechs are one of the few nations to take such considerations for lefties, the 82 has an ambi-safety and also the ambi holster. And also the CZ85, the ambidextrous version of the CZ-75. Very considerate of the Czechs to not force lefties to shoot righty, like most military forces do. I'm right handed so it doesn't matter to me, but I'm sure a lot of left handed Czech cops and soldiers appreciate it.
    Last edited by stantheman86; 10-26-2009 at 09:02 PM.

  42. #42
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    May 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NvWardog View Post
    What I love about the 82 is they remind me almost of the Ruger 10/22 which is the best $200 rifle you can spend $3,000 on!
    Haha. You're so right. I just leave my milsurp stuff stock.

  43. #43

    Default

    I normally don't like necro posting, but this past weekend at the RKshows Gunshow in Springfield, I saw a 10/22 being sold for $900. With the number of upgrades he had including: aftermarket magazines (ten of them), aftermarket stock with 1913 rail, a mounted EO-Tech holo sight (itself worth over $100), and some kind of bull-barrel.

    I'm amazed at how much people spend on somethings. I don't understand it myself, but I guess satisfaction of some kind is derived from completely overhauling a $200 firearm.

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