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  1. #1
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    Jul 2009
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    Default making dummy ammo from live

    want to make a few rounds of non firing rounds from live ammo.

    can I basically drill a hole in the side case and let the powder out and oil the primer and then clean off teh sharp metal from around the hole that I drilled??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Michigan, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aj81557 View Post
    want to make a few rounds of non firing rounds from live ammo.

    can I basically drill a hole in the side case and let the powder out and oil the primer and then clean off teh sharp metal from around the hole that I drilled??

    Oil or WD40 well the primers. Let it sit for a day or two. Then pull the bullet with a pair of pliers. and dump out the powder. When the case is empty you can then drill a hole in the side of the case to show its a dummy and reseat the bullet.
    Owner/Administrator of Gunboards.com
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    Michigan Historical Collectables

    "Tulta munille!"

    "Terror is not a new weapon. Throughout history it has been used by those who could not prevail, either by persuasion or example. But inevitably they fail, either because men are not afraid to die for a life worth living, or because the terrorists themselves came to realize that free men cannot be frightened by threats, and that aggression would meet its own response. And it is in the light of that history that every nation today should know, be he friend or foe, that the United States has both the will and the weapons to join free men in standing up to their responsibilities."
    John F. Kennedy

  3. #3
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    Default There's no foolproof way to kill a primer............

    .............or so I've read. I once read an article written by someone who soaked primers in water, oil and WD40 for several weeks, and most still fired! (I've been meaning to try this, myself, with older military primers and new commercial primers) I wouldn't rely on oil or any other compound to "possibly" kill a primer. They are more resiliant than you might think. The safest thing to do would be to use a bullet puller and pull the bullets, disperse/spread the powder in the yard, fire the primed case in a rifle, and reseat the bullets. (clean rifle barrel properly if the primers are corrosive) Be sure to point the rifle in a safe direction when firing off primers as a noticeable flame may exit the muzzle. The firing pin indention in the spent primer should be enough to allow you to know it's inert, but it could also be a "dud", so drill a hole in the case, if you like. Just my 2 cents.

    Dale
    Last edited by tenntex32; 08-18-2009 at 08:35 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    76

    Default

    would there be any danger in drilling the primer from the primer side of the bullet.

    I don't have a bullet puller nor any dies. so would I be able to remove a bullet without severally destroying it and also how would the bullet stay in place after being reinserted??

  5. #5
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    Sep 2007
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    Default

    I agree with the floow up as I forgot to add that. I would after killing the primer fire it in a safe direction into the ground to be sure the primer is dead.

    Use a good set of pliers-they are seated by friction and will come out with a good tug. Reseat they will stay with friction or a bit of epoxy or glue on the inside of the case-applied with a toothpick will do it.
    Owner/Administrator of Gunboards.com
    Mosin Nagant.net
    Michigan Historical Collectables

    "Tulta munille!"

    "Terror is not a new weapon. Throughout history it has been used by those who could not prevail, either by persuasion or example. But inevitably they fail, either because men are not afraid to die for a life worth living, or because the terrorists themselves came to realize that free men cannot be frightened by threats, and that aggression would meet its own response. And it is in the light of that history that every nation today should know, be he friend or foe, that the United States has both the will and the weapons to join free men in standing up to their responsibilities."
    John F. Kennedy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aj81557 View Post
    would there be any danger in drilling the primer from the primer side of the bullet.

    I don't have a bullet puller nor any dies. so would I be able to remove a bullet without severally destroying it and also how would the bullet stay in place after being reinserted??

    Don't drill the primer!!!! Very dangerous. They are explosive and pack a surprising amount of energy!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    787

    Default

    Is it your intention to use the 'dummy' rounds in a gun, or as display pieces?

    If in a gun, it would be better to buy purpose made 'snap-caps'. They will protect the firing pin if you intend dry firing the gun.

    If for display, you could drill the case, empty out the powder, then soak it in oil for a few days. But it is not advisable to chamber it in a gun afterwards, as the primer may still fire, and if it does it could force the bullet part-way up the barrel causing a potentially dangerous jam, or even force it right out the barrel and hit something or someone.

    If you dont have a bullet puller, you could use pliers to pull the bullet but this might mark it, so you might want to wrap a bit of tape around the bullet first to prevent damage. An alternative to pliers is to hold the bullet with a drill chuck. don't overtighten it, and make sure the drill is not connected to power.

    Another option is to use fired cases, and ask someone that reloads that caliber if you can have a few bullet heads to make the dummies with.

    In fired cases bullets will usually be slightly loose, so use an epoxy glue to hold them in place. (Clean inside the case neck first)
    In new cases, or ones that have had the bullet pulled, the bullet head might be difficult to reseat without a die, but you can use a vice or 'c' cramp to slowly push it into the case. If you do this with oiled primers it might be a good idea to use a washer between the case head and vice jaw, so that no pressure is applied to the primer.

    Another option for making dummy rounds that you can cycle through an action is to use fired cases with a short length of wooden dowel held in place with epoxy adhesive. You can shape the tip of the dowel with a pencil sharpener, or hold it in a rotating drill chuck and shape it with a file.

    Whatever option you choose, always think SAFETY FIRST, and be very careful of any primer that is live.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    2,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vic View Post
    Use a good set of pliers-they are seated by friction and will come out with a good tug. Reseat they will stay with friction or a bit of epoxy or glue on the inside of the case-applied with a toothpick will do it.

    in my experience, the bullets will stay in the cases until you chamber the round. then it gets stuck and you have to whack the bullets out with a cleaning rod.

    and if i add a lot more glue to hold it, then sometimes the round won't even chamber as i've changed its shape.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    18

    Default Making Snap Caps

    When I bought my Enfield 2A I wanted some 'dummy rounds' to practice working up smoothness and speed on manipulating the action.
    So I made some spring loaded snap caps. Turned down a brass screw to fit the primer pocket drilled out to .209" (#4 drill) and set an automotive parts spring (.312" dia) held in place with a 30cal Sierra 2115 150gr slug.
    Yes, I did wind up drilling holes through the cases - otherwise it looks just like live ammo!:eek: Attached photos tell the story.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    177

    Default

    I remember reading an article in American Rifleman, probably in the 80s or 90s saying the only way to reliably deaden primers was to heat them on a hot plate.

    They would take live rounds and remove the bullet and powder charge then set them standing up on a hot plate with a protective cardboard "dome."

    The primers would cook off, apparently with some force, leaving a casing suitable for display rounds.

    Charlie

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    4,932

    Default Safe making oif Inert rounds.

    Take once-fired cases, remove primer cups, dismantle anvil, use a small punch to flatten out and remove the Firing Pin Indentation. Replace "remade" Cup (NO anvil).
    Full length size the case, reseat FMJ bullet, and heavily taper crimp (I use the FLS die to do this.)

    Guaranteed almost indestructible "Drill round" ( we do this for Movie use...and add a couple of lead shot in the case to ID the cartridge as "Inert." (it rattles)

    As to using Live ammo, the drill and drain powder is fine, but use Vinegar to kill the primer from the inside. It destroys the lead foil seal, and deactivates the priming compound chemically. Takes anything from a couple of days to a week. Oil can take many weeks, and then still not be safe.

    Oil or WD40 has first got to penetrate into the Primer (thru the Foil and Lacquer) and then it may not deactivate the contents...so a "dead" primer by the oil method may still fire...a Vinegar deactivation is permanant..as the chemical composition of the priming compound is irreversibly changed.

    Even with factory (or Military) Cartridge. Inerting, I would still stengthen the Grip of the neck on the bullet by running the shell through(partly) a FLS dies.

    Regards,
    Doc AV
    AV Ballistics.

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