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  1. #1

    Default 303 to 7.62x54r conversion

    I have a 303 sporter that I would like to ream to the Russian round, as ammo for the brit has dried up and it would also cut down on multiple calibers.
    I looked high and low for the procedure but haven't found any info. I have a 7.62x54r reamer at the gunsmithing hobby class. Does any one have a link or saved file on the conversion? ThomasR

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    This has been answered before; try searching the forum.

    As I recall, the chamber won't clean up with simple reaming, you will have another shoulder on the fired brass; may not be a problem though.
    03man - Don Voigt
    Author of "The Japanese T99 Arisaka Rifle" 2010 edition
    Co-author of "The Knee Mortars of Japan 1921-1945" 2011 edition
    Near Charlotte, NC

  3. #3
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    The .303 shoulder is about 1/2" ahead of the Russian round and barrel set-back is required to do the conversion. Not exactly "hobby" gunsmithing.
    It's cheaper to buy 7.62X53R, pull it apart and use the bullets and powder in .303 cases---if your time isn't valuable.
    It makes even more sense to buy brand new Prvi Partizan .303 soft point and fire that.
    -----krinko

  4. #4
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    Is the Prvi Partizan easy to reload if a guy becomes a first-time reloader with a bit of it?

    I've only read and talked to people about reloading and also curious whether Prvi can be reloaded as many times as US-made cases.
    Have a good #4 and #5 with matching bolts/actions, which have only used some surplus ammo.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laufer View Post
    Is the Prvi Partizan easy to reload if a guy becomes a first-time reloader with a bit of it?
    Yes it is, it's a good idea to full length resize your cases rather than just neck size if you are using a couple of different rifles though.
    Last edited by cruisey; 09-02-2009 at 02:58 AM.

  6. #6
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    I can't say whether this is a good idea or not, but I don't like two things about this proposed modification:

    1)the idea of removing substantial amounts of material from the chamber wall to do this modification.

    2)How much more pressure does 7.62x54 generate than 303.

    So you are taking steps toward a set of possibly unsafe design parameters. Are you confident that this is a sound project with regard to these issues.

    Some study and planning is called for, I think, to verify whether or not this is a sensible modification.

    Edit- if you're only doing this due to 303 ammo scarcity, you'd be a lot better off pulling powder and slugs from 7.62x54, and loading those into your own 303 casings. That's far safer in my opinion than the proposed re chambering. Of course you have to follow a sound load development procedure when working up powder charges for the ammo you assemble from 7.62 components.
    Plus, the 303 magazine might not feed 7.62x54without modification.
    Pull down instead, a far better idea.
    Last edited by Francis Marion; 09-02-2009 at 12:18 PM.

  7. #7
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    Our club has been using 7.62X54R pull downs for our .303s for years.

    Both LB 147 grain and HB 182 grain work well for accuracy. Mainly shot out of #5MK1s.

    My favorite is Bulgarian YT HB 182 grain, fairly cheap still, and 37.5 grains of the orginal powder. Shooting three in. groups or less is the norm at 100 yds.

    We buy the Bulagarian 54R in quantity and our have our expert hand loaders do the loading for us.

    Brass used is a mixed bag, of whatever is available. We avoid S&B brass, it is too thin and not good for this application.

    For really fun shooting the reduced loads and .32 Hornady bullets work well, but we haven't figured out how to do that cheaply.

  8. #8
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    Apr 2008
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    On a side note. There is an outfit in Minden Nev. that does Enfield conversions.

    I used to buy #5MK1 wood from them.

    IIRC they converted to 7.62X39 not 54R. There was a reason for not going to 54R, but I forget what the story on it was.

    If I find the link, I'll post it.

  9. #9
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    index.html


    Link to Special Interest Arms Enfield conversions

  10. #10
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    Default +1 on Krinko on barrel setback...

    ... with the right cartridge selection there is no problem setting the barrel back and reaming the chamber.

    Thousands of rifles were converted here in Australia to 7.7 x 54 due to a local prohibition on owning rifles in a military calibre many years ago. The 7.7 x 54 is basicaly a .303 with one turn taken off the barrel thread. The chamber is reamed so the standard .303 cartridge base still fits, but there is no reaming at the cartridge neck or shoulder. Ammo is pulled, the shoulder set back, and a reduced charge put back in. The reduced charge is important since the cartridge case volume is very significantly reduced by shortening the cartridge case.

    A very popular load in these rifles was a 140 gr RNSP hunting round.

    Can't answer if the operating pressure of the 7.62 Russian rounds are significantly higher than the .303, but it would pay to check it out.

  11. #11
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    And if da gubmint suddenly decided to ban imports of 7.62x54R??
    .303 unprimed brass is not a problem and even reloadable .303 can be found.
    What is the rifle going to be worth once it's been buggered?

  12. #12
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    Sep 2007
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    What size is the 7.62x54R (308 or 310) I have used the 310 projectiles and all i can say is that in my No5 they are not that accurate. 311 are not bad 312 are very good. Reloading is not hard, sounds like the USA is just getting to where a lot of us have been for some time or have never been. SURPLUS whats that.

  13. #13

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    Thanks everyone for thier input. I would never bubba an original c and r. Never have.
    never will. I picked up some sporters at an auction that some else had sporterized. I figured
    I would cut down on the myriad of calibers. Since the nagant round can be had for a 25 cents a round versus 303 at 80 cents and above. The savings made sense.
    The college has all the equipment. Reamers, Lathes and Mills, antion/barrel tools. The bad news in all this is they don't have the 7.62x54R reamer, I thought they did.
    The cheapest way is to reload. I'll have to get dies. I am probably going to go the cast bullet route, and possibly use components frome the existing surplus on the market.
    The procedure that I remember was to ream the barrel while on the action insuring
    proper headspace, an adjustment was made to the magazine to insure feeding. Using brass cased ammo it would fire form another shoulder in the process. Like an AI fireforming. The brass was then discarded. Allways the best knowledge is found from the people on Gunboards. Thanks ThomasR

  14. #14
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    just an observation and answer for a previous question, my finnish mosin nagants were proofed at 3,600 atmospheres. that'd be 52,920 psi. is that comparable to the .303? y'all have a good day, Keith

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    52,920 psi??!! That would be way too much for ANY No. 1 Mk III action, but a No. 4, (which has endured conversion to .308) might take it.

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