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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    ATX
    Posts
    712

    Default Is there such a thing as bulk surplus 45 ACP any more ?

    Does this exist on the surplus market anywhere, these days ? Did the CMP ever sell it ?

    I'm guessing not any more, as the US military transitioned away from the 1911 for the most part decades ago, but....I have to ask you fine people anyway. I'm late to the 1911 party with a RIA, and it's the most accurate handgun I own. But at 40 cents a round, I don't get as much practice as I'd like to.

    Opinions ?

    TIA.

  2. #2

    Default

    At one point (15+ years ago?) their was surplus .45 but now I don't see it very often. When it does come up it is typically more expensive than commercial. If you want to shoot a .45, your basic choices are to pay the price for commercial (roughly $.35/round in bulk) or reload for $.15-$.20/round.

    Prices for rifle rounds are starting to come down so hopefully pistol rounds will ultimately come down as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    4,028

    Default

    Handgun shooting to any level of proficiency requires practice, practice, and more practice!
    Unfortunately, with current ammo pricing and availability, the amount of practice required is simply impossible. Even if you can afford it, you can't get it!
    Reloading, while considerably cutting the costs, is still time consuming and expensive. Components have been hard to come by.

    An alternative, one which lets you adequately practice for a reasonable price tag, is a .22 conversion kit.
    I bought my 1911 with a Kimber .22 conversion kit at the same time knowing full well I could not afford or obtain enough .45 to master the gun. A 5000 round case of .22 cost $180. That's a lot of shooting!
    With the conversion, the gun feels the same (weight is close), the grip, stance and trigger control is the same, the slide cycles and the gun still goes bang. While the recoil is less, it still very much approximates the feel of full power loads.
    Son and I can expend 200-300 rounds each of .22 to warm up to the point of "hitting the groove" and then fire one or two magazines of .45 to end the day. By the time you have sufficiently warmed up to switch over to .45, you will be "in the groove" and do well with the limited amount of .45 you end with.

    For revolver, we do the same with a S&W 617, the only revolver with the same weight and feel of the full power .38/.357.

    Your investment in a .22 conversion kit or a .22 revolver will pay for itself in only a few sessions considering what you could spend shooting a similar amount of full power rounds.
    You can shoot enough to keep your proficiency levels up to par and feel good about the results.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    885

    Default

    Yep, learn to reload!
    Gregg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    879

    Default

    Blazer is usually the least painful new production ammo to buy and works fine (my bro has a rock island .45) The range that we shoot at also carries commercially reloaded ammo (precision cartridge I think) and that's the way to go.
    Of course as others said you can also undertake your own reloading but I haven't gone down that road yet

  6. #6

    Default Cast your own bullets and pick up cases at the range.

    Even the aluminum and steel cases: aluminim is good for one or two loadings, and steel a few more than that. Casting bullets is easy and the ammo is accurate. You can shoot a round for basically the cost of the primer and a little Green Dot. 8mmFan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Land of freakin' snow and ice
    Posts
    4,739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 8mmFan View Post
    Even the aluminum and steel cases: aluminim is good for one or two loadings, and steel a few more than that. Casting bullets is easy and the ammo is accurate. You can shoot a round for basically the cost of the primer and a little Green Dot. 8mmFan
    I have reloaded steel cases for .223 but I have never tried to reload aluminum cases. I spend about 5 hours a week at our local range and usually during that time I will have an opportunity to grab some brass cases that someone doesn't want. The caliber may not always be what I am short of at that particular time but eventually I accumulate enough to satisfy my requirements. The only reason I even tried to reload steel was because my Saiga's always beat the snot out of my brass cases. The steel worked fine for a reload or two but I wasn't going to try to start trimming steel cases so they got pitched as soon as the length expanded too much.


    .
    "The sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament..."

    I'm starting, to suspect that I, don't know how to use commas.

  8. #8

    Default

    It is also very effective to do a ton of dry fire drills. Live fire is a necessity,
    but dry fire is just as essential in the big picture.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Winder, GA
    Posts
    718

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