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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    502

    Default Ross rifle /carbine

    Hello guys ,,first of let me tell the story behind this rifle,,was at a local show over the weekend and saw an old ross rifle sitting on a table ,,well never owned one so i ask how much ,,the guy said 25 bucks ,i took a double take and it was pretty rough but looked complete ,,he proceeded to tell me it sat in a garage for the last 25 years and before that he had it hanging in the garage for who knows how long ,,and how he had it hanging was by 2 screws he mounted one thru the buttstock and then he drilled a hole thru the barrel about 9" from the muzzel ,,but i still said i'll take it ..i figured id part it out,,the bolt worked and it seemed to cycle but the rust and old black paint on the receiver was pretty bad,,so i brought it home and to the basement i went,,i fired up the bench grinder with a wire wheel and started to clean it up..its a md10 with a 4 digit serial number..

    once the rust was gone i'm thinking why would someone drill a hole thru the barrel on what looked like it was a pretty nice old ross rifle ? well the bore was rough from sitting for who knows how many years in a garage and i started thinking mabey i can do something with this ...

    i deceided i'd make a carbine lenght rifle outa it just to see what how it would look ,,well i don't condone cutting milsurps down but it wasn't much good like it was except for parts and only having 25 bucks in it what the hell..so i broke out the hacksaw and started cutting ,,i cut the barrel just behind the hole and it came out at 21",,then i reshaped the end of the stock to give the apperance or the original rifle and moved the rear band back a half an inch to give a little more space between the bands ,,and i think it looks pretty good concidering what i started with,,mabey ross should have tried the carbine route lol,,,,it kinda resembles a styer now ,,i got the bore cleaned up pretty decent and have recrowned the barrel and now all i need to do is take it to the range ,,..

    i know it will never win any prizes and some guys will say it's buctherd ,,but i think it looks pretty cool for a basement project and a couple hours and 25 bucks invested ,,lol
    thats why they call me crazy ,,i guess,,lol,,i have a question for anybody who might know on the barrel in front of the serial number it's stamped PLY,,anyone know what that might have stood for ??thanks and go easy on me ..lol..lol first 3 pics are before the conversion,,last 6 are the finish product,,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,375

    Default

    Be carefull with a 1910, they are the one that the bolt can be improperly assembled. Should have a rivet to make that not possible, but study up on them and check it over if you intend to shoot it. You certainly got your $25 worth, in my opinion. I just got a bubbed 1905 shooter, and payed 6x that for it. Hope you didn't cut down a complete original length stock, they are worth good money.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Baltimore MD
    Posts
    1,064

    Default

    I've heard of a couple of MKIIIs with a PLY prefix SN added to the barrel. It's not an original factory SN, on the MKIII they were stamped into the wood buttstock. My guess is that they were added in Canada but don't know by whom or why. Will try to remember to take a look in my copy of The Ross Rifle Story when I get home tonight. Seem to remember something about the letters PLY being in there.
    You certainly got a lot for $25! Me, I'd of tracked down one of the numerous bubba'd MKIIIs out there with complete actions and a good bore and between the two piles of parts would have gotten a nice MKIII, worth at least $500. That original, full length stock was probably worth $200 or more, they're impossible to find along with the upper band.
    As to the rivet on the bolt, not all MKIIIs have 'em. I own two ex RCA MKIIIs and a British Home Guard MKIIIB and none of them has the rivet. Someone posted two excellent photos showing a properly assembled bolt in one and an improperly assembled bolt in the other. Made it easy to tell if your bolt was safe to shoot. Printed them out but can't remember where I ran across it for the life of me (I'm at work and don't have access to my stored bookmarks on my home system).
    The problem with the rat race is that even if you win you're still a rat!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    502

    Default ross

    hello all ,,thanks for the replies ..well i took it to the range today and it shot pretty good concidering what it looked like when i got it ,,the stock was pretty good before i cut it down but the hole from the barrel was partially cut into it also ,,figured it had some value but i like to experiment with junkers ,,and this was a worthwile experiment in my eyes..and hey i got one of the only carbine versions ever made,,lol,,lol,, ..the stock has a number 772 on it and III stamped in it also ,,bolts on these are pretty smooth ,,only fired a hal dozen rounds to check for pressure issues and extraction and no signs of excessive pressure and extraction was excellent ,,it's a keeper and a good conversation peice,,

    i appreicate the info and have read the horror stories about the bolts reassembled wrong,,i also read that they were a very strong action and were proof tested at 28 tons ..thats alot of pressure behind the design and beleive me i was a little nervous when i first fired it from a tire ,,lol,,lol,,but i really was surprised how mild the recoil was with the milsurp ammo i shot ,,i guess because it's heavy,,shot just shy of a 2" string at 50 yds free standing point of aim and thats not bad concidering the bores a little rough and i'm not as good as i was when i was younger ..lol..,,but a few rounds cleaned it up pretty nice..i'll do some sandbag tests down the road when i get more time,,

    oh another question.. i read somewhere that they incorperated a saftey to aid in the bolt dissasembly problem,,were they standard on all model 10's this one doesn't have one and it looks like mabey there never was on...but the bolt is locking up right so i don't think someones taken it apart,,it's still a cool looking and shooting carbine and i'm happy! and i call it my 10 PLY carbine..lol..
    crazy
    crazy
    Last edited by crazy; 10-13-2009 at 02:11 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Baltimore MD
    Posts
    1,064

    Default

    Ross did build a handful of MKIII "carbines" with 26" barrels upon hearing that the std MKIII was too long to be handy in the trenches. Alas, it was around this time that all the issues with the MKIII were being hashed out in a very public way and the powers that be weren't interested in the shortened Ross.
    You're correct, the weight of the MKIII, while a bane to the soldier who had to heft it around, makes for a mild shooter. My shoulder's favorite .303!
    Took a look in my copy of The Ross Rifle Story for info on the PLY mark but haven't found anything yet. The book's a wealth of info but a bit of a train wreck in how it's organized.
    The problem with the rat race is that even if you win you're still a rat!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    502

    Default thanks again

    hey thanks for that info ,,i didn't even know there was a carbine version made ,,from what i've found online the problem was they were designed as a sporting rifle and i guess most hunters don't lay in mud covering there rifles ,,i said most hunters ..lol..this rifle/carbine seems to have a nice hefty feel to it and i think the design is high quality and in the right conditions could be an excellent rifle ..but i can see the problems with dirt and mud or debrie causing the lugs to not fully engage and the bolt rotation is not visable unless you really watch the bolt head actually turning into place ,,something in battle ya can't do with every shot.. and from what i can see the bolt body doesn't actually lock into place when closed like most bolt actions ,,so it can make you wonder if the lugs are fully engaged or not?? when ya read about problems encountered with any rifle it makes you wonder if it could happen to you!! and that doesn't sound like fun !! and it's something ya think about everytime ya pull the trigger ,,thanks again for the reply and if you find anything about the PLY markings that would be cool to know what they stood for ..
    crazy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    502

    Default range time with the ross

    hey guys,, figured id post a pic of the target from the range time with the ross m10 rifle/carbine ,,not bad for a basement project ,,25
    bucks,, some military ammo ,,and getting the sites dialed in,,lol,,what a blast to shoot!,,run around 50 rds threw it today,,and the actions just got smoother with every clip threw it ,,now i need a original to go along with the shorty,,lol,,lol,,i hate when that happens !!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hello crazy, I am new to this forum. I also have a Ross MarkIII. It has been sporterized and has a PLY serial number on the barrel. I have been compiling a list of known Ross serial numbers and a found some others with PLY serial numbers. There is one in the Canadian War Museum collection that still has the military serial number on the stock but also has serial number PLY 2404 on the breech. I don't know if this is a military marking or if it means that an unknown company sporterized thenm at a later date.

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