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Thread: husqvarna calibers

  1. #1
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    Default husqvarna calibers

    does anyone know what calibers the husqvarna model 33 came in.also what is the max pressure is for this action.i would like to find out more about this firearm.thanks

  2. #2
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    Here is what the factory bluebook lists:
    6x36R
    6.5x42R
    8x42R
    8x57R/.360
    9x47R
    9.15x57R/.360
    9.5x47R
    10x47R
    10.5x47R

    If they were other factory chambered calibers, SBHVA or rudybolla would know better than I.

    As to maximum working pressure, I don't think we know that. Given that most of the factory chamberings started out as black powder cartridges, I would guess it would be in the 15,000-30,000 PSI range, but that is only a guess and not a fact. The rifle and the cartridges were intended for Swedish grouse (tjedde) hunting and other small game.
    Last edited by kriggevaer; 12-05-2009 at 09:31 AM.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  3. #3
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    Forgot to include the modell 14 shotgun gauges of 28, 24, 20. The modell 14 used the same action as the 33.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  4. #4
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    Default

    Also 5.6x35 Vierling.

  5. #5
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    Went throught the rolling block sticky at the top of the page and Pettson shows Nr. 33 rifles in 8x58R Sauer and 9.3x57R.

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=2011
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  6. #6
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    From wat I've seen and been able to make chamber casts of, there were at least a handful more cartridge options for the #33, except those mentioned in the book. And the 6x35R in the book is most likely an erroneously labeled 5,6 mm Vierling.
    Judging by my own observations only, I'd say that the 8 mm and 9,3 mm versions are the most common.

    The diversity in cartridge options and other little peculiarities makes the 33 an interesting model indeed.

    Pettson

  7. #7
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    The Nr. 33 was produced from 1877-1912 and this, at least in my foggy mind, brings up the question of the metallurgy differences (e.g., tensile strength, resistance to deformation etc.) between the early production receivers and the late production receivers. It would be fascinating to know what year each of the caliber chamberings was brought into production. I don't know if it would mean much, but it would be fun to do a serial number/caliber list to create a relative timeline for this. I know I am pushing the limits of available knowledge, but it would be fun. Thirty-five years is a fairly long production run for a sporting rifle and I would guess that there were changes in steel and production methods used during that time.

    The CIP Pmax figure for the 8x57R/.360 cartridge is 2450 bar(35,534 PSI) so the little Nr. 33 receiver appears to have been able to handle some respectable pressure. But, given age and amount of use (abuse), what any rifle receiver will handle can and does deteriorate.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  8. #8
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    I have noticed through my limited exposure to the model 33 that the parts for them are defiantly not interchangeable. I am not referring to small differences that could be taken care of with a little filing and some hand fitting. For example, some of the hammers have shoulders that are much too high to clear the receivers in some guns, and cannot be cocked.

  9. #9
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    Hej JK,

    That is very interesting - I don't know what that might indicate. First thought was that these firearms were all hand-fitted and so each rifle is virtually unique in its tolerances. But, that is just WAG on my part. Another mystery to be solved.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JK View Post
    ...parts for them are defiantly not interchangeable...
    I know what you mean, some parts just refuse to cooperate.

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