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Thread: 1951 RFI #1 MKIII Enfield

  1. #1
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    Default 1951 RFI #1 MKIII Enfield

    I picked up a 1951 dated RFI #1 Mk III (.303) this past weekend at a small gun show in a trade.

    The bad news is it's CAI import marked but the good news is that it's completely matching including the mag. Other than stock dings from storage and such it is in excellent shape with a pristine bore and 90%+ blue.

    I know what the DTE stamp is but can anyone tell me anything about the JOD stamp on the butt stock? Does the big S on the underside of the wrist mean the stock size?

    From what little info I can find on these they seem to rank as a poor cousin to their Brit counterparts as to fit and finish but other than a crudely finished BP my rifle looks great.

    Another odd thing I noticed was there is no rack number painted on the butt stock. Every India Enfield I've ever seen has a rack number on it.

    I managed to get a pic of the stamps before being kicked off due to security concerns with this site.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1951 Ishi 001.jpg  
    "Senator, don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining."

  2. #2
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    If you are happy with the rifle, don't worry about import markings. Import markings are just part of the gun's history and a means for some people to establish an artifical difference in value between their gun and your gun. As things become scarcer to find due to collector pressure, such markings will become a non issue.

    There was a time in the 1950's when the collectors would not touch guns with post build markings like Well Fargo and Co.! In the 1960's the market was flooded with Britsh issue Colt and S&Ws and collectors didn't like the markings. Now collectors collect only those guns. As my mother used to say, "This to will pass."

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1srelluc View Post
    From what little info I can find on these they seem to rank as a poor cousin to their Brit counterparts as to fit and finish but other than a crudely finished BP my rifle looks great.
    .
    Is it a BP or a DP ?
    Whereabouts is the BP / DP marked ?

  4. #4
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    BP = Butt Plate.
    "Senator, don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1srelluc View Post
    BP = Butt Plate.
    Sorry - I was confused, I thought you had a 'BP' marking.

  6. #6
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    "If you are happy with the rifle, don't worry about import markings. Import markings are just part of the gun's history and a means for some people to establish an artifical difference in value between their gun and your gun." --breakyp

    Well written!

    1srelluc, An Ishapore in original glory doesn't seem to exist. Most we've recieved have been rearsenalled at least once. That said, I've only seen two, one my '41 and a '50 at a match that were nearly perfect. Both had the buttplates replaced and splices, and very well done too, in the butt's heel and tow. The Indian army loves to drill!

    Respect for the Ishapore rifles seems to be growing, as it well should. Yes thery're often a cosmetic train wreck, but generally function quite well.

    Brad

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
    1srelluc, An Ishapore in original glory doesn't seem to exist. Most we've recieved have been rearsenalled at least once. That said, I've only seen two, one my '41 and a '50 at a match that were nearly perfect. Both had the buttplates replaced and splices, and very well done too, in the butt's heel and tow. The Indian army loves to drill!

    Respect for the Ishapore rifles seems to be growing, as it well should. Yes thery're often a cosmetic train wreck, but generally function quite well.

    Brad
    Well I seem to have one (other than the import mark) and it has me wondering......Why would the Indians not have used this rifle? There is no rack number, it has not seen a rebuild that I can tell and other than on the high spots there is little blue wear. Even though the stock is dinged from 58 years of storage and handleing all the markings are crisp both inside and out with no repairs. Same with the metal stampings. Maybe that JOD stamp (whatever it is) can shed some light.

    I still can't load pics but you can go here to see more pics both before I cleaned it up and after. http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/vie...655334#p655334
    "Senator, don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining."

  8. #8
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    The 'S' under the butt indicates a split/spring washer under the stock bolt. The JOD stamp looks like a late arsenal/depot stamp...not sure which one offhand.
    "If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen." --- Samuel Adams

  9. #9
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    JOD maybe = Johor Ordnance Depot or :

    InIndian music, the jor (Hindi: जोर; also spelled jod and jhor) is a formal section of composition in the long elaboration (alap) of a raga that forms the beginning of a performance. Jor is the instrumental equivalent of nomtom in the dhrupad vocal style of Indian music. Both have a simple pulse but no well-defined rhythmic cycle. (from Wikepedia)

  10. #10
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    According to Peter Laidler on another forum--JOD was a mark applied in the 1960s in Malaya. If I remember correctly. It had my interest as I have the same mark on a NO.4 Mk1(T) buttstock.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan De Enfield View Post
    JOD maybe = Johor Ordnance Depot or :

    InIndian music, the jor (Hindi: जोर; also spelled jod and jhor) is a formal section of composition in the long elaboration (alap) of a raga that forms the beginning of a performance. Jor is the instrumental equivalent of nomtom in the dhrupad vocal style of Indian music. Both have a simple pulse but no well-defined rhythmic cycle. (from Wikepedia)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by breakeyp View Post
    According to Peter Laidler on another forum--JOD was a mark applied in the 1960s in Malaya. If I remember correctly. It had my interest as I have the same mark on a NO.4 Mk1(T) buttstock.
    If true my RFI really got around!
    "Senator, don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining."

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