Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1

    Default How long does water keep?

    How long does water keep? That sounds like a silly question. I try to keep at least the recommended number of gallons of water on hand stored in one gallon plastic jugs. This is treated city water so I would think no problems with microbes inside the jugs. Perhaps the plastic might impart chemicals to the water over time. So how long should I keep each jug?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Absurdistan
    Posts
    1,420

    Default

    While not technically a definitive answer the most commonly quoted answers: most rotate every 6-12 mos, some do 2 yrs; the bottled water I buy has a use by date of approx 2 yrs; and finally the way I do it in my larger containers is to treat the water with oxygen stabilizer which is supposed to increase shelf life to 5 yrs...(this might be hocus pocus voodoo stuff, but I'm testing the theory to find out)... Storage temp, container type and light exposure likely affect the answer to your question, so I suspect that's why a definitive answer is ellusive... BeSwift
    "The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well"
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    http://www.appleseedinfo.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Projec...64406060313831

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    816

    Default

    What kind of containers do you use?

  4. #4

    Default

    The translucent milk jugs that have only been used for water.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    My feeling is that I will keep the bottled water for as long as the bottles stay sealed, but after a few months in storage I will add bleach or iodine tabs before drinking just to be sure. Reason being that old bottled water is still going to be better, in theory, than what you might scoop out of an unknown source, because at least it started out safe and clean.
    Regards, Alan K.
    Available for Cabinet level positions, consultation on matters of foreign policy, weddings and bar-mitzvahs. Will work for gold or guns.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    533

    Default

    I use the 5 gal water cooler jugs, the blue tops you peel off can be reused many times over, and reseal tight. I use them to take to camp on a rotating basis so age isn't a issue. But I'd bet they'd be good for 6 months.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,273

    Default

    As long as the original water source is pure & clean & the bottles are inert & sterile, forever.
    Usually one or the other isn't 100% clean so stuff starts growing.
    When the entire world is PO'd at you maybe its you, not the whole world that has the problem!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Flint, MI. America's Jewel
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    Tap water is cheap so the only reason not to change it is because of the hassles and mess, maybe liked canned goods you can rotate it when you water your plants etc so you aren't wasting it. On the other hand it's probably fine to leave it (out of the sun etc) for long periods of time, adding a sterilant or preservative like those used in winemaking or canning if you feel the need.


    If you start with good quality water and a good container under proper storage conditions those are probably the main determinants for how long it will last.
    The surplus of verbiage oft times consummates in a loss of perspicacity!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TC2xTCb_GU

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NW Arkansas. Close to the Okie line, so I can get across ahead of the tax man from Little Rock...
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    Water, like energy, is neither created nor destroyed in biological systems. The stuff that makes up our oceans has been around for billions of years.
    Pistol keeps me safe.
    Shotgun keeps me fed.
    Rifle keeps me free.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Water does not 'expire'. Your containers will deteriorate over time. As long as the containers are in good shape, the water is fine. If you really feel the need, iodine, bromine or chlorine can be added at the time of use but should not be added while the water is in storage because they are oxidizers and will hasten the deterioration of your containers. City water will have non-pathogenic bacteria in it and over time will accumulate a thin film of these bacteria on the walls of the container. They generally won't hurt you but can be killed with normal halide disinfection.
    rr2241tx

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lawrenceville Georgia
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Check out www.sodis.ch (there is a tab at the top for the English language page). It's all about Solar disinfection of water. " the SODIS-method - is a simple procedure to disinfect drinking water. Contaminated water is filled in a transparent PET-bottle or glass bottle and exposed to the sun for 6 hours. During this time, the UV-radiation of the sun kills diarrhoea generating pathogens." So as long as your containers are PET - or you have at least one container you can transfer it to - and have a little sunlight you can get drinkable water without boiling or adding chemicals.

    Note however that it won't change the chemical nature of he water - so if there are bad chemicals in the initial water you'll just have germ-free chemical water when you're done in the sun.

    SODIS is recommended by WHO (World Health Organisation) as water disinfection method at household level and is part of WHO’s international network to promote household water treatment and safe storage.

    I keep a copy of the SODIS flyer in my BOB. I figure I've read it and am convinced but my wife and neighbors may need to see it for themselves when the time comes to actually do it/trust it.
    "Deputy Dan es mi amigo." Deputy Dan has no friends.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    Stored water will not expire, but it will probably have bacteria or some gunk growing in it.

    Many years back during the Cold War Nuclear scare, I can remember reading pamphlets on how to store water.

    Add a drop of Chlorine per gallon or so, to keep stuff from growing in it. Should last for years then.

    I am sure there is more scientific info. on this on the internet somewhere. You want good info. not just opinions when your life is on the line.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Tarrant County, Texas
    Posts
    806

    Default

    You can freeze it, can it (vacuum pack), or just keep it bottled up. It doesn't do well in the dehydrator, though. I don't see why you can't just can water like you would beans. Boiling the water and sealing it in a jar should keep the water pure for years as long as it doesn't freeze in the jar.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NW Arkansas. Close to the Okie line, so I can get across ahead of the tax man from Little Rock...
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeputyDan View Post
    ....Check out www.sodis.ch (there is a tab at the top for the English language page). It's all about Solar disinfection of water. " the SODIS-method - is a simple procedure to disinfect drinking water. Contaminated water is filled in a transparent PET-bottle or glass bottle and exposed to the sun for 6 hours.....
    Another good use for all them gallon wine bottles I accumulated back in my drinking days....
    Pistol keeps me safe.
    Shotgun keeps me fed.
    Rifle keeps me free.

  15. #15

    Default

    Water is good forever, provided your container is truly inert and the only issue is preventing fungus from growing in the long term. 99% of the food grade plastic will impart BHA and BHT into your water after awhile and it's not a good thing. Don't use glass because in an earthquake bad enough to cause water disruption, they'll be broken in the first few seconds. I've been in 7 large earthquakes and trust me, if it's glass, it's broken.

    If you're going to store water, put 1-2 drops of bleach per gallon, 4 drops if the water is from an unsafe or suspect source and 8 drops if the water is dirty from a street puddle. Stir the water for 30-40 min before drinking, make sure before drinking chlorinate water, that you let it sit open to the air for 30-60 min before drinking, so the bleach evaps out.

    My personal opinion is instead of storing water and spending money rotating or trying to maintain a large stock of it, get a Katadyn pocket filter. This filter is the finest in the world, it's small, will clean the most horrendous biologically contaminated water source and will last for 30-40,000 gallons. You can't lug around tons of water, but you can take along a 1lbs filter that will provide everyone around you with clean water from any source.

  16. #16

    Default

    Thanks, there's some good information in this thread!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Having watched this thread and seeing where it has gone, water filters are a good thing if you are on the move. Storing water is good if you have a place hidden away somewhere but what about your primary residence? Why are you storing the water, just store the container. Every home has 30 to 40 gallons already stored in the water heater, it only needs to be drained. If that isn't enough water then why not add an additional tank (unused water heater tank) inline with the houeshold water supply. As you use water in your house the water is replaced with new so you always have a fresh supply.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Tarrant County, Texas
    Posts
    806

    Default

    I keep a few gallons ready at home just to account for water main breaks. Around here, the ground has large amounts of clay. In dry weather it shrinks. In wet weather it expands. Consequently, water main breaks happen once or twice a year. In the spring and summer I collect rain water. It comes in handy for emergency toilet flushes and watering plants.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Flint, MI. America's Jewel
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2muchstuff View Post
    Having watched this thread and seeing where it has gone, water filters are a good thing if you are on the move. Storing water is good if you have a place hidden away somewhere but what about your primary residence? Why are you storing the water, just store the container. Every home has 30 to 40 gallons already stored in the water heater, it only needs to be drained. If that isn't enough water then why not add an additional tank (unused water heater tank) inline with the houeshold water supply. As you use water in your house the water is replaced with new so you always have a fresh supply.
    Water heaters are expensive, a couple of hundred dollars for even a cheap one. If you are adding one anyhow to 'pre warm' cold water to room temperature before it goes in the active water heater, saving some money that way, no problem. But just for storage it makes more economic sense to have a few 6 or 7 gallon containers around plus you can move them and have the use of them for trips etc.
    Also when water mains break they are usually followed by a 'boil water' advisory, and all of that heater water is now suspect and needs to be boiled whereas the jugs are ok. You also have the problem of flooded basements during storms or power outages, many water heaters are kept there. Water heaters are a good water storage source certainly but should be one of several.
    The surplus of verbiage oft times consummates in a loss of perspicacity!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TC2xTCb_GU

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    /Free^State\
    Posts
    17,760

    sick school being closed GOV sent a team

    1959 failout shelter water! GOV. SENT guys too take it out of our school before it was closed 15 years ago? was kept in 50 gal containers, was still good. the guy popped the top, dipped in a glass took a big drink and said would be good for ever? and better cold. i got a gygercounter. no one knew the door to a hidden shelter in a janitors storage room was even there.<><dk
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 02-03-2010 at 05:42 PM. Reason: more
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,913

    Default

    I hear the 20 gallon /CD\ tins with plastic liners still have good water in many that are opened. Seal it right, and it will last a long time.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    562

    Default

    description of CD containers please? i seem to remember some of them from long ago and far away as being metal

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,631

    Default

    Opened a jug of '99 yesterday. Fine. In fact, what a year...
    Alden

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    I remember seeing CD marked 55 gallon steel drums of water. I imagine they would have to be plastic lined to prevent rusting from the inside and stored in a dry location to prevent rusting on the outside.
    Regards, Alan K.
    Available for Cabinet level positions, consultation on matters of foreign policy, weddings and bar-mitzvahs. Will work for gold or guns.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,631

    Default

    Why do I remember 55 gallon Vietnam-Era CD drums full of multi-colored hard candy -- kinda like a square pillow in shape.
    Alden

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,913

    Default

    That was the carbohydrate ration, along with hardtack. I like CD stuff.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Central Joisey
    Posts
    713

    Default

    I recall having the 5 gallon, grey colored CD (Civil Defense) stored all over the place - especially in the old telephone company buildings as they were under federal jurisdiction at that time. At the time of the y2k scare, old cans of CD water (canned in the 50's) were tested and found to be good without any additions. I wonder how many are still in storage - knowingly or not... I am sure the spec's on these are available to the public.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,913

    Default

    The only thing that was found to go rancid in some cases were the hardtack/biscuits. They were recalled in the 70s or 80s. The containers were lined with a heavy waterproof lining, maybe vinyl.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North of the Great White North
    Posts
    6,148

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammerklavier View Post
    How long does water keep?
    Until it gets too dry to drink.


    OK, I apologize for that one....but I couldn't help myself!


    The Expert
    Geal ‘us dearg a suas!

    Member since Gunboards v1.0

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    141

    Default

    I've heard that water can go "stale" after sitting up, but that you can remedy the "stale" taste by re oxygenating it by pouring it back and forth between 2 containers. Not sure if this is true, but it sounds cool...and it's worth a shot.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    We're gonna need a bigger boat.
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    Some prefer to store water and others prefer to fill containers before an incident occurs. Well, if you're storing the containers anyway, with the exception of the collapsible type, they take up the same amount of room full or empty so you might as well keep them full. Now here's the latest. Nashville is flooding since this past weekend due to heavy rains and the deluge has rendered one of the city's two water treatment plants inoperable. Thousands of residents have been advised not to drink, cook, or bathe with tap water unless they have boiled it first. Also this past weekend, in Boston on Saturday, a 10 foot diameter water main broke and two million people have been advised to boil water before drinking, cooking, or bathing with it. Kinda makes it hard to fill your jugs when the water coming from the tap is contaminated huh? FEMA is handing out bottled water in both cities, but if you can't get to a distribution point you're going to be pretty thirsty before these incidents are sorted out.
    Regards, Alan K.
    Available for Cabinet level positions, consultation on matters of foreign policy, weddings and bar-mitzvahs. Will work for gold or guns.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •