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  1. #1
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    Default should i avoid lacquered case ammo?

    I have a M39 and love to shoot her, but i have read many stories on using lacquered cased ammo that gummed up the action when the gun is hot and the lacquered run off and have the bolt become sticky. for this reason, i have avoid buying lacquered cased ammo, am i wrong? and also how you are going to clean the lacquered run off once it got cold and hardened inside the gun? thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneforall View Post
    I have a M39 and love to shoot her, but i have read many stories on using lacquered cased ammo that gummed up the action when the gun is hot and the lacquered run off and have the bolt become sticky. for this reason, i have avoid buying lacquered cased ammo, am i wrong? and also how you are going to clean the lacquered run off once it got cold and hardened inside the gun? thanks
    yes. The stuff sucks. You gotta scrub it out with a 12G copper wire brush on a drill.

  3. #3
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    Leave it all for meeee!

    Seriously, it varies by rifle and you don't know till you try. I've several Finns that have zero issue, others that hate it.
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  4. #4
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    so i get it i think, if my gun has a tight action, i'd better leave the lacquered stuff alone. i think i will shoot none lacquered ammo unless i have to use it.

  5. #5
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    Oneforall,

    Waffenlandser is yankin' yer' chain. Shot an M39 for the first time last Saturday. Shot Yugo light ball in gray lacquered cases. Rifle, ammunition and I guess me, functioned flawlessly. Smooth and sure fire. Shot the best groups from any hi-power rifle that I have fired. The lacquer does not come off. Shot thirty rounds over about twenty minutes and the barrel was quite hot. No issues. Commercial ammo with lacquered cases have no idea. Will buy more of the Yugo at the next show if it shows up. Cheap and very good.

    When I cleaned the rifle no unusual junk came out of the bore or chamber. Good rounds.

    Lancebear

  6. #6
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    I'm using all my lacquered stuff up first, and save the brass and even the copper washed for real shooting later. Then no sticking problems.
    64,999,987 firearms owners killed no one yesterday!
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  7. #7
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    [B]Vaarok told you the deal.

    It depends on your rifle.

    I have had copper washed cases stick as well as laquar cases stick : this is steel cased ammo and every now and then a case will be tighter after firing in the chamber: thus a sticky bolt.

    The only laquar that has consistently given me the characteristic of sticky bolts repeatedly and seems to melt and flow is the Czech laquar cased stuff and thats packaged in light greenish
    blue 20 rd boxes and easy to spot.

    Right now there is hungarian light ball ammo on the market in a light grey laquar case and it does not stick any of my bolts.

    If you have a choice : probably best to get copper washed cased ammo. If not: try to avoid the Cz laquar stuff.

    All that said: some guy had a 800 rd case of Laquar Czech stuff at the show last month for $125 and sticky bolt or not: I grabbed it. This will be my winter shooting ammo and should be fired up before weather warms up and it sticks up my bolts.

    Also: I shoot M39, M44, 91/59, 91/30 and NEW 1891 rifles: Have had sticky bolts in all of them at one time or another with laquar or copper washed ammo. I cannot predict when a sticky bolt will happen but if it were really common in any one of them, I would go after cleaning the chamber as one of the members mentioned. Its just not a problem that occurs with any certainty/regularity with any one ammo or weapon. If there is a trend in my shooting: its the Cz laquar light balls stuff that has the high degree of this sticky bolt occurance. For me: there is a trend with that flavor of 54R ammo. Your results will most certainly vary.

  8. #8
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    I avoid all lacquer coated ammo because it makes it easier and causes less problems in the long run. Yes some shoots good and if your rifle does well with it more power to you! But don't say that some one is wrong unless you have covered all the bases first. If you have shot over 300 or 400 rifles then make a statement like that otherwise let it be.

    One thing I have noticed that helps shoot lacquer coated ammo is to not chamber the new round till you are ready to shoot it. This keeps the ammo in the firing chamber for a shorter time and it will be less likely to get too hot and melt the lacquer and make it stick. I also keep the bolt open if possible for awhile to cool things down just a bit. Some of that stuff shoots somewhat accurately but the possible side effects with certain rifles make it iffy and can ruin a good day at the range.

    I have certain rifles that will shoot anything they are fed with no problems at all, a Romainian M44 comes to mind at once as it is flawless with anything I feed it and fairly accurate too. Older M91's I have don't feed lacquered ammo well at all and one M27 that is real early is very finicky about anything I try to shoot in it. Like many have said above the rifle has the answers for you and the final word too. Good Luck with your choices! Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

  9. #9
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    The laquered stuff is smooth thru my Finn capture 91/30, but the copper washed make it hard to open the bolt. The copper washed are great thru my 91/59, but the laquered make it very hard to open the bolt. Like Zeebill said, the rifle will answer this question and point you in the right direction re: which ammo to buy.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by milprileb View Post
    [B].All that said: some guy had a 800 rd case of Laquar Czech stuff at the show last month for $125 and sticky bolt or not: I grabbed it. This will be my winter shooting ammo and should be fired up before weather warms up and it sticks up my bolts.
    Could you tell me who's selling the 800 round case of Czech ammo for $125? I'll buy it.
    Just one more Mosin and my collection will be complete!

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  11. #11
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    Mosinmeister: sorry but it was not a dealer , some gentlemen selling off his stuff at a local show and I lucked into it. Very Lucky as my son was with me to haul it to the truck.

  12. #12
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    I use Hungarian laquered steel cased ammo in my pu sniper and have never had any sticky bolt problems, even after rapid fire (35 rounds in 5 minutes) after that it was HOT! One of the things that can cause sticky bolt syndrome is residues of cosmolene left in the chamber, which reacts with the laquer when hot and turns into goo. I havn't used any other laquered milsurp ammo, but I would be suprised if this sort of ammo was issued to troops, knowing that it would give trouble during a fire-fight by gumming up weapons.
    ukrifleman

  13. #13
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    I've seen the laquered ammo in 7.62x39, 5.56x45, .223 but never came across any in 7.62x54r.
    I concur, don't chamber until you are ready to fire and do so in a prompt manner.
    Also isn't the barrel much hotter than the chamber in most situations?
    "My gruel tastes like hot water"
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  14. #14
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    i think i will buy a tine can worth to try out, my other question is how best to clean the dried up hardened lacquer in the chamber if i have a run off? thanks

  15. #15
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    I would avoid shooting all ammo in the rifle, it will stay very clean.
    Sam Cummings laughs at us from the grave!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HepCat View Post
    I've seen the laquered ammo in 7.62x39, 5.56x45, .223 but never came across any in 7.62x54r.
    I concur, don't chamber until you are ready to fire and do so in a prompt manner.
    Also isn't the barrel much hotter than the chamber in most situations?
    If I remember correctly Wolf is all lacquered. It was all I could get locally. Now I can't get anything.

  17. #17
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    I've shot laquer coated surplus for a number of years out of my Mosins and only had a problem once with a new to me M38. Cleaned and polished the chamber and never had any more problems. I think the biggest problem here are the steel cases which do not expand as much as brass and the carbon that blows back into the chamber between the chamber wall and the steel case. I doesn't take much carbon to make the extraction heavy, but we're talking several hundred rounds most likely. I think taking the time to make sure and clean out the chamber good after shooting is the best remedy...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FGD135 View Post
    I would avoid shooting all ammo in the rifle, it will stay very clean.
    Oh my sides hurt!!!!!!! Very Well Spoken! I may not be able to eat breakfast after that one. Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

  19. #19
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    Yeah, laquered ammo is soooooo bad... I just ordered 500 rounds of Barnaul 203gr SP in green laquer. IT's your RIFLE not the ammo. Try cleaning it.

    Read a gun cleaning guide sometime. Almost all Remington manuals state, "keep chamber / bore OILFREE". I bet you you don't run a dry patch or buff jag before you shoot.

  20. #20
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    Oldfred: i have not shoot any ammo with lacquer coated, and i read they can be tough to clean, so that was my op questions came from. i think i will try get a case and see if the gun like it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneforall View Post
    Oldfred: i have not shoot any ammo with lacquer coated, and i read they can be tough to clean, so that was my op questions came from. i think i will try get a case and see if the gun like it.
    There are a lot of myth's some true but most untrue about Mosin Nagants. Sticky bolt is usually caused by firing split case ammo. Upon ignition, carbon welds itself to the chamber and causes burrs. When you chamber another round and fire it, the case expansion grabs into the carbon deposits and locks the shell in. Laquered case ammo may tend to stick in these burred chambers, but so does copper washed cases. Remove your bolt and use a bright flash light to inspect your chamber. A low speed electric drill (slow and steady wins the race) with a 20 gauge brush soaked in solvent will cure your ills....

  22. #22
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    Laquered brown bear is just about all I shoot. I've never had any sort of problems. Only once have I ever had a sticky bolt, but I had only fired one shot so the gun was still cool. I don't think it had to do with the ammunition.
    Looking to purchase a Lebel/Berthier front sight, PM me if you have one!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldFred View Post
    There are a lot of myth's some true but most untrue about Mosin Nagants. Sticky bolt is usually caused by firing split case ammo. Upon ignition, carbon welds itself to the chamber and causes burrs. When you chamber another round and fire it, the case expansion grabs into the carbon deposits and locks the shell in. Laquered case ammo may tend to stick in these burred chambers, but so does copper washed cases. Remove your bolt and use a bright flash light to inspect your chamber. A low speed electric drill (slow and steady wins the race) with a 20 gauge brush soaked in solvent will cure your ills....
    thanks for the tips Oldfred.

  24. #24
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    Dec 1969
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    Try beeing stuck 10 hrs away from home on a dog hunt with no extra extracters , because I was to cheep to buy non laqured ammo.

    Stay away from it

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