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Thread: Help With WK&C Sword

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default Help With WK&C Sword

    I picked this up at a local pawn shop yesterday for $15, i made an image of the hallmark it has on the blade, but i could not get a good picture of it.
    i have looked around on the web and found a few other sword that look similar to it, and they have a wide range of dates from the 1800's on into WWII, along with a wide range of values.



    I'm looking for help identifying this sword and perhaps a value, tho I'm not selling











  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Nice sword Clohesey,

    15$ is an absolute bargain price!!!
    Alas I can't help you with puting a date on this sword, like you already said this was a popular style of sword and it has been made from the early 1800's till WW2.
    What I can tell you is that it is a private purchase sword for a low ranking officer, because their is no engraving or etching on the blade I guess it is a cheaper version.
    In my collection I have a rather similar sword, the hilt is compleetly the same, but the blade is much more curved (a Malamuke style blade) and engraved; my sword is made by the Dutch sword maker: Segers from Breda.
    I'll try to make some pictures today and post them in this thread.


    Cheers,
    Peter

  3. #3
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    Jun 2008
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    My example:

    - Made by Segers in Breda (Holland).
    My estimated guess is that this is an example made in the first part of the 19th century.
    This type, M1813 N1 was used by the Belgo/Dutch cavalry in the period 1814-1830.
    It is a private purchase cavalry officers sword with nice military style engraving of a typical type for the early 19th century.
    The curved blade was a popular style/fashion in that period and in the engraving a device is engraved in French: "Acier fondu coupant le fer" (forced steal cuts iron); a device that reminds of the famous Belgo/Dutch cavalry charge against the French cuirassier in Waterloo? I don't know.


  4. #4
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    The hilt is exactly the same as your example:




  5. #5
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    .


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default

    Thank you peter, that a sweet piece of steel you have there, and in much better condition than mine. i have posted this thread on another forum, and here is what i have found out so far.

    Reply #1: NCO sword German, value about $100 to $130 in that shape. I saw few with engraving on it, which sold for $150 to $175. They are not so popular. But you got it for a great price.

    Reply #2: They stopped using that sharkskin/fish skin grip in the twenty's

    Reply #3: WK&C stands for Weyersberg, Kirschbaum, & Company of Solingen. The knight's head and king's head logos date from the middle of the 19th Century when they were 2 different companies; for a fairly brief time around the turn of the 20th Century they used this combined logo. By the time of the TR the Kirschbaum part ( being Jewish! ) was totally dropped. As has been noted, the fish skin grips had been replaced by Bakelite or celluloid covered wood by then as well. Another indicator of this being pre-WWI is the fixed-ring on the scabbard, which was replaced by the separate ring by then as well. This is a standard dress/service sword for an enlisted man, usually worn by senior NCO's in various orders of full dress. The style continued into WWII when an order prohibiting the wear of all swords in all orders of dress was finally issued late in the war.

    SO, its made by: Weyersberg, Kirschbaum, & Company of Solingen, Fish Skin Handle, Fixed Ring Scabbard, Worn By German NCO In Full Dress, Pre-WWI. But still no actual date..... i would really like to put an accurate time frame with this sword.

  7. #7
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    Jun 2008
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    Thanks for the compliment Clohesey!

    "But still no actual date..... i would really like to put an accurate time frame with this sword. "
    - With all this information I think you can date it +/- 1890-1900.
    Like I said I have also no clue of which period my example is. Early 19th century or a revivel piece from the same period as yours?

    regards,
    Peter

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