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  1. #1
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    Default What are the best Mausers for the 7x57 cartridge?

    Who made the best Mausers chambered for 7x57 based off of your experiences? Should be interesting!

  2. #2
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    I'm going to interpret "best" as quality of machining, fit, and finish. My vote goes to the 1895 Chilean's made by Lowe. They exhibit a level of craftsmanship only approached by the finest Swedish Mausers IMHO. Next, I'd choose the 1908 DWM Brazilian, followed by the 1912 Steyr, and then the FN SA contract rifles. Spanish and Mexican's bring up the rear.

  3. #3
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    British sporters in .275 Rigby, followed by Chilean 1895s.
    Turk Pr0n!

    I have written a novel. Science fiction alien-invasion set in 1908 Russia. You should buy a copy!

  4. #4
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    for me its the styre 1912 chilian, 7x57 and a 98 mauser action. mine looks like it was never issued,if it had been bubbified i would have made a super deer rifle out of it. eastbank.

  5. #5
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    Hard to argue with my 1908 Brazil. 29" barrel and a pristine bore! It doesn't get much better than that.
    There's nothing more dangerous than a colossal, bankrupt, and well-armed government--- Porter Stansberry

  6. #6
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    I'd have to rate the CZ24s in 7mm near the top when considering metallurgy and quality of fit and finish.
    This post contains the Amish virus. Since the Amish have no electricity or computers, you are on the honor system. Please delete all your files. Thank you

  7. #7
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    I'm not really sure yet because i don't have them all yet. I thought i was the only one looking for the 7mm's all these many years.

    I like the 1908 brazilian 7mm mauser for its 98 receiver. But the south american made '93 DWM's and the '95 Lowe's are hard to beat in the quality too. Then its the m95 and spanish carbines too. I like them all anything in 7mm..........

    The 7mm mauser round (7x57) is one of the flatest shooting rounds there is. Using a 125yd zero the bullets path varies about 1/2" to 5/8" the whole distance from the muzzle to 125yds. The 30-06 was copied from the 7mm mauser.

    We often do a mid bore shoot at the local range using the 7mm mausers and the 6,5mm swede's. Its just a fun shoot with no big bore shoulder pain at the end of the day.

    BTW; I have a VZ24 in 7mm comming soon......
    Are you ready for 12-21-2012?? Lets pray its the second comming of Christ and not the end like so many predict.

  8. #8
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    My personal favorite is the '08 Brazillian, I had one with a pet load of 49gr of IMR 4350, a Speer 145gr BTSP that would shoot 3/4 inch groups at 100 yards. Only mods to the rifle was a timmy trigger and a scope. I would love to have another '08.

  9. #9
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    My favorite 7x57 cartridge rifle is my 1941 Johnson. I prefer it to the 06. Better accuracy and less recoil. Have both barrels so do both. Gary

  10. #10
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    I'd have to also go with the 08 Brazilian. I just finished one that unlike eastbanks, had been bubbafied. I wanted to restore mine to a semblance of a military looking shooter. The link is from the "Workbench" thread. I also have a 6.5X57. Its amazing what a difference .5 mm will make.

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...M1908-Modell-B

  11. #11
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    I will jump in here and say as far as Brazilian models I would consider the Brazilian Model 1935 as the cream of the crop. Lets also not forget the very nice Venezuelan Model 24/30. Ed
    mauserdad
    John 3:16 & 17 KJAV 1611
    NRA Life Member

  12. #12
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    The 7x57 is perhaps on of the best hunting cartridges ever designed. Even the "Dean of American Gun Writers", "Jack O'Connor sung its praises till the end of his days. He and his wife Eleanor once took two of them On African Safari as their one and only rifles. This is how highly he thought of the cartridge. With the 175 grain bullet it will kill anything on the planet including elephants. I once bowled over a Moose with one with only one shot while my companion took 6 shots to kill his Moose with a .375 H&H magnum. Proving of course if you place a deep penetrating bullet of any caliber large or small in a vital area the animal falls down dead no matter how big he is.

    The 7X57's easy recoil and very long barrel life make it superior to most of the big bore magnum blasters as just about anyone can shoot it without flinching and missing the shot. It's accuracy is outstanding and when coupled with a quality 98 Mauser action it just does not get any more reliable, accurate and deadly. Lets face facts when Jim Corbett bet his life on one to save himself from some of the most dangerous man-eating tigers that ever lived you simply cannot get any higher praise for the caliber or the 98 rifle.

    A little known fact is that Corbett actually owned two of these rifles (.275 Rigby). One he bought at a gun store brand new and the other was a gift to him, also brand new. One is still in existence I am told and is owned by a gun writer whose name at the moment escapes me. The fate of the other seems to remain unknown.

  13. #13
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    yep, the 7X57 mauser cartridge is a very good round, no doubt about it. Maybe why the 257Roberts is such a great cartridge too for it is just a 7X57 necked down to 25 cal.
    As for the best mauser for the 7X57, I do like the clean lines of the 1895 Chilean Mauser. However, I happen to own a model 1936 Mexican 7mm Mauser that is in excellent original condition. Kind of a hard to find model mauser since not that many of them were produced in Mexico. Rifle is very accurate. Rifle has typical mauser two stage trigger, but you'd think it was a Timney trigger when you reached the last stage. I've let some of my fellow shooters at range, who are very familiar with mausers, shoot the rifle without warning them of how smooth and light the trigger pull was. Wow, was there general reaction to the trigger pull, couldn't believe it was a military trigger in it. Anyway, rifle is well made, has some unique features being a small ring with large ring safety features such as third lug on bolt and the rear of bolt has a 1903 springfield type knob. To me, the 1936 Mexican 7mm has to be one of the best.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by huff View Post
    To me, the 1936 Mexican 7mm has to be one of the best.
    If you can find one! :P

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    We don't see that many mexican 7mm mausers because of what was available were turned into sporters because of there 98 bolt sized small ring receivers. I don't know how good the 7mm mexican mausers were as shooters but they were probably the most sought after.

    Can anyone really rate all the 7 mm mausers in a list for quality?? (them all)
    By adding in the model 93's, the model 95's and the model 98's. Is there one that stands out better than the rest or is it just the 1908 brazilian 7mm mauser thats the tops.
    Last edited by 1911crazy; 02-05-2010 at 03:26 PM.
    Are you ready for 12-21-2012?? Lets pray its the second comming of Christ and not the end like so many predict.

  16. #16
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    the 7x57 maus id like to have is a venezuelan? rifle made for the Olympics.
    PISDETS VSEMU

  17. #17
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    So far I've hear that Mexican Mausers are top notch or at the bottom of the barrel...what experiences support these claims? The ones I've see seemed to have quality manufacturing, but certainly not on par with the Chilean or a few of the Brazilian Mausers I've seen...

  18. #18
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    Has anybody mentioned the Mauser 1935 Chilean police carbines?

  19. #19
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    Of all my Mausers, my first and still favorite is my Venezuelan M24/30 carbine. With the short barrel, it's a blast to shoot.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Venez 24 30_1.jpg   Venez 24 30_2.jpg  

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by indian1941 View Post
    Of all my Mausers, my first and still favorite is my Venezuelan M24/30 carbine. With the short barrel, it's a blast to shoot.
    Ditto for that. I too have one but with the super rare "Original Red stained walnut military stock". Some years later I was able to find an FN ABL semi-auto in 7x57 with the same red military stock. Talk about luck.

  21. #21
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    It is a great cartridge, but it was developed in 1892.There are other cartridges that were developed before it that are still being manufactured. It is not "THE" oldest. The 7.92x57 Mauser, the 7.65x53 Belgian Mauser,the 7.5x55 Schmidt Reuben (1889), 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser,7.62x54R Russian and the 303 British (1889). They are all great cartridges.I do agree with you that the 7x57 Mauser and the 30-06 are two of th best all round cartridges.

  22. #22
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    texasrifleman, right about finding a M1936 Mexican.

    LOL, hard to find any mauser Mexico had that is still in decent shape. Story how I came by my M1936 Mexican. Had sent a barreled action to Mark Skaggs, a gunsmith in Oregon to rebarrel and do some other work. Had gone to a local gunshow outside of Houston to brouse. At gunshow was a gunsmith who had brought in his private stock of mauser type actions. He no longer liked to do mauser conversions and decided to sell them. On display were two M1936 Mexican mauser actions, ones I had never seen but caught my eye for their unique Springfield type knob on the bolt. Anyway, after I had returned home from gunshow, called the Skaggs in Oregon to check if he'd received the action I'd sent him and chat about the work I wanted done. Somewhere in our conversation, mentioned the gunsmith selling a variety of mauser actions and described the Mexican actions. As soon as I mentioned them having the Springfield knob on bolt, he became very excited about them. Turned out Skaggs needed a bolt for a 95 Chile and couldn't find one and I told him that I'd seen one at the gunshow. Volunteered to go back to gunshow to buy and ship to him. Soooooo, early the next day I went back to gunshow and bought both for $140 each. LOL, after I'd paid the gunsmith for them, he thought for a second and said, "Been a long time since I've sold one of those actions, just remembered I usually got well over $200 for them." Sent both actions to Skaggs and the 95 bolt. He kept one M1936 action for cost of furnishing a new barrel and installing it and doing other gunsmith work on the action, such as furnishing and installing a Bold trigger.

    Then when I'm waiting for Skaggs to return the M1936 barreled action back to me, found a M1936 Mexican mauser on an internet auction. This particular auction company was handling the Darnell gun collection. Jeeeez, must have been well over 2,000 firearms in Darnells collection and thousands of rounds of ammo to auction off, for they had about 5 auctions with each featuring about 400 + rifles/pistols over a 6 month time period. Anyway, auction company could not I.D. the M1936, receiver had been scrubbed so no Mexican crest on it and its description just said, mystery mauser type rifle. 7mm? There were good pics of rifle and easily saw the springfield type knob. Only one guy bid against me and he dropped out at $220, leaving me the winner. Sheer luck on my part. When I posted the picture of the rifle on Surplus Rifle.com guy there told me he'd been trying to buy one for about 15 years to complete his Mexican mauser collection and that he'd never seen one in such good condition.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobVZ View Post
    I'm going to interpret "best" as quality of machining, fit, and finish. My vote goes to the 1895 Chilean's made by Lowe. They exhibit a level of craftsmanship only approached by the finest Swedish Mausers IMHO. Next, I'd choose the 1908 DWM Brazilian, followed by the 1912 Steyr, and then the FN SA contract rifles. Spanish and Mexican's bring up the rear.
    this is an old thread but worth revisiting, the best 7mm rifles were made by FN or German plants, for the S. American contracts. The cream of the crop would be a model 98 pattern i.e. Brazilian. The M95 Chileans while nice, are pre-98 patterns with no safety lug, just a small boss on the receiver that is behind the bolt handle and acts like a safety lug of sorts. The M95 cocks on closing as well, not as desirable as a M98. I have a M95 Chilean short rifle and many other 91-96 Mausers, but mostly 98's. I would agree the Chilean is the best pre-98 type, although not finished quite as nice as the Swedes I've had. If one wants the best possible 7MM milsurp rifle, the only way to fly is an FN or German M98 pattern. The FN's are typically very nice guns and often better tolerance fit than the German made ones, just don't have the same pedigree as the German guns. IMHO the best Mauser to invest in, would be an Oberndorf made gun, because that was the "home plant" where the licenses were then subbed out from, to other plants. I know Oberndorf made 7.65 x 53 M98's but would have to research into the 7mm. I'm sure they did somewhere along the line in either military or sporter form.

  24. #24
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    Chilean 1895 or 1912. Great rifles!
    God bless our Veterans, past, present, and future.
    All gave some, some gave all.

    Have a good one,

    - Ron

  25. #25
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    MY premier Target (Long range) Mil. rifle is a Mismatched M1908 Used Brazilian Long rifle...goes to show that even with a mismatched bolt, they are accurate.
    Follow this with a M1912 Chilean Steyr, and a M95 Boer bringback and Chilean M95 close equal third.

    The other makers, Models, etc, all fall in behind these.

    I found that the Long rifles are better suited to the M1893 175 grain Round Nose Cartridge, and the later(Short rifles) to the 140grain Spitzers. ( Both Milsurp and Handloads.)

    Best ammo for my Brazilian, FN70 (Berdan, FMJ)...8 "heads" out of 10 at 400 metres, Prone off a sandbag. (we shoot military targets)...the ho-hum shooting is me, not the rifle.

    Regards,
    Doc AV

  26. #26
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    Default Three South Americans

    Quote Originally Posted by DocAV View Post
    I found that the Long rifles are better suited to the M1893 175 grain Round Nose Cartridge, and the later(Short rifles) to the 140grain Spitzers. ( Both Milsurp and Handloads.) Doc AV
    I would second DocAV's recomendation of the heavier bullet for the long rifles- I use 175 grain Hornady's with IMR 4350 or IMR 4831 powder. The three rifles are pre-1968 shooters ($30) and matching except the Peruvian bolt. For another $5, you could get mint condition, but who had that kind of money then?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails SAMau 004.jpg  

  27. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by lcmunn View Post
    ........... For another $5, you could get mint condition, but who had that kind of money then?

    I agree, $5 was almost 4 hours pay at minimum wage back then and, like you, I couldn't afford the extra $5, especially since that would fill the gas tank of my VW and buy me and my date dinner. As long as we didn't eat too much.....

  28. #28
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    Besides the Chilean 1895, I like the 7mm Brazilian 08/34. Fun little rifle.
    " The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous."
    Frederick Douglass, American Abolitionist

  29. #29
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    My pick would be the 1935 Chilean Carabineros Carbine and 1935 Brazilian long rifle. Both are pre-WW2 Oberndorf made and top quality. Both also have sights starting at 100m so no aim-off needed on the range.
    Life is best viewed over the rim of a latte bowl.

  30. #30
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    I've had a 1895 Chilian 7mm , all matching, for 50 yrs. Still shot it regularly and it's my most accurate Mauser. Will out shoot my 98's. I did put it in a small ring Turk stock as I find it is even better with a pistol grip stock. I still have the original number matching stock also. I personally like the cock on closing better also. Extraction is smoother and faster.

  31. #31
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    To echo what others have said, I'm partial to the 1895 Chileno (especially the long rifle, but my short rifle is respectable as well), the 1908 Brazilian long rifle, and the 1935 Chilean Carabineros Carbine.

    All of these rifles are of the highest quality, but the 1935 tends to shoot closest to the actual point of aim. That's due to the 1935 having a minimum sight setting of 100 meters instead of 400 for the 1895 and 300 for the 1908. The other two aren't too far off, though.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  32. #32
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    Remington model of 1934


  33. #33
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    didnt venazulea do an olympic mauser in the 7mm? i saw adds for them in the late 90's? and kick my self now. missed that boat. the only thing i dont like on some SA maus is the super tight twist.
    PISDETS VSEMU

  34. #34
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    frown

    I will agree w/ the 95 Chilean Mauser. I had one many years ago and it was in pristene condition and it shot like a dream. I ended up selling it to a guy who made a bubba gun out of it. That was a sad day. BTW, I love the 7x57 cartridge. Though I have no Mauser chambered it now, I do have a Ruger #1 single shot chambered in 7x57 and it is one nice shooting gun.
    7x57guy
    Last edited by 7x57guy; 06-13-2012 at 07:43 PM. Reason: spelling

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by solman View Post
    didnt venazulea do an olympic mauser in the 7mm? i saw adds for them in the late 90's? and kick my self now. missed that boat. the only thing i dont like on some SA maus is the super tight twist.

    Yes they did

    FN 24/30 Target model




  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 308nutt View Post
    My pick would be the 1935 Chilean Carabineros Carbine and 1935 Brazilian long rifle. Both are pre-WW2 Oberndorf made and top quality. Both also have sights starting at 100m so no aim-off needed on the range.
    REAL Mausers were made at Orberndorf.

    Regards,
    Bill

  37. #37
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    For collecting I'm a Serbian Mauser fan!......For shooting you can't go wrong with the M1912 Steyr, whether Chilean, Colombian or Mexican contract.

    JPS

  38. #38
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    Another vote here for the M1936 Mexican Mauser:

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...97#post3063797

  39. #39
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    I have a Chilean Steyr 1912 short rifle with a matching bolt and pristine bore that is a dream to shoot with the lighter bullet. I also own a Oberndorf made 1908 that
    is hard to beat with the 175gr.

    Ski
    Looking for Oberndorf bolt 2138h

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserdad View Post
    I will jump in here and say as far as Brazilian models I would consider the Brazilian Model 1935 as the cream of the crop. Lets also not forget the very nice Venezuelan Model 24/30. Ed
    I agree, the 1935 Banner Brazilian Long rifle is a piece of art.

  41. #41
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    With all the votes for the Chileno Modelo 1895, how come no one mentions the Spanish 1893 rifle which is supposed to be identical to the M1895?

  42. #42
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    I had the privilege to work on one built for Ernst Shafer's 38 Tibet expedition. Finest rifle I ever touched.

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