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Thread: "Fire Blue"

  1. #1
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    Default "Fire Blue"

    Every time I get one of my rifles out to take photos I'm always amazed and reminded of the quality of the Mauser rifle made almost 100 years ago. The "fire blue" of the rear sight, floor plate release, as well as the ejector box and stripper clip retainer of this Argentine 1909 rifle are just amazing.

    No photo shop this is what they made almost 100 years ago.

    This rifle will probably be on it's way to a new owner soon, so I just had to share.







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  2. #2
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    Just plain beautiful.

    tac

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    Nitre blueing - very simple to accomplish and VERY beautiful.

    Basically, the parts are immersed in molten Potassium nitrate. You can do it at home too by heating the part to yellow hot and "burying" in KNO3, or sometimes you can cover the part in KNO3 and ignite/melt the KNO3 and then card off the crud.

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    What purpose does the bluing salts have? I thought that the color was just from the heat. I do some knife making as a hobby and you get pretty much the same colors from tempering the metal (I use the oven, but don't tell my girlfriend that!). Or is the salts just to get the temperature more even across the parts?
    Looking for a M95 sniper, unusual, Czech, and 1913 or earlier M95s and early Czech 98/22s (Vz 98).
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  5. #5
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    This is why the South American Mauser's stand head and shoulders over any other military rifles ever made. They make today's modern plastic and cast iron and stamped sheet metal rifles look like the garbage they are.

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    These export rifles were made to extra high standards as a form of advertising for Mauser products. Imagine all the rusty South American junkers today that once looked like the Argie pictured above. It's a crying shame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGreenMan View Post
    What purpose does the bluing salts have? I thought that the color was just from the heat. I do some knife making as a hobby and you get pretty much the same colors from tempering the metal (I use the oven, but don't tell my girlfriend that!). Or is the salts just to get the temperature more even across the parts?
    The point of bluing is to bind iron atoms. Iron atoms that are not bound, will react with oxygen and form iron oxide also known as rust.

    Bluing is a type of rust only in this case it is controlled rusting with the goal of preventing uncontrolled rusting which is reaction of oxygen with iron in iron objects and steel object.

    Do you oil your knives? Why? To keep oxygen away from iron.

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    Thumbs up That's craftsmanship

    Quote Originally Posted by JIMMY C View Post
    Every time I get one of my rifles out to take photos I'm always amazed and reminded of the quality of the Mauser rifle made almost 100 years ago. The "fire blue" of the rear sight, floor plate release, as well as the ejector box and stripper clip retainer of this Argentine 1909 rifle are just amazing.

    No photo shop this is what they made almost 100 years ago.

    This rifle will probably be on it's way to a new owner soon, so I just had to share.
    She's a real beauty. Two questions -What caliber is it, and what is the barrel/receiver, stainless?

  9. #9
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    Sir - no stainless firearms were mass-produced guns until the late 1950's, and that was in the USA.

    The sheer high-quality of the high chrome-content steel is to blame here.

    AFAIK, Mauser NEVER made ANY firearms out of stainless steel.

    tac

  10. #10
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    I believe the process of fire bluing was to place the parts into a bath of melted nitrate and to hold in the bath for a specified duration to obtain the color desired, anything from straw yellow to the deep blue. I purchased some of these salts from a friend of mine but have not yet used them. What I purchased was a Lee lead pot full of a solid block of the salts from where they had previously been used. When cooled they formed a solid block. The salts can be used again by heating and melting, holding at a melted temperature for a while to alow the absorbed moisture (the salts are hygroscopic) to boil off. I also received loose granular salts in a bag, a thermometer and a tea ball to hold small parts and immerse them in the melted salts. What I don't have is a time and temperature chart. But i'm sure I can find one when I am ready to use this process.

    Vlad

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TFoley View Post
    Sir - no stainless firearms were mass-produced guns until the late 1950's, and that was in the USA.

    The sheer high-quality of the high chrome-content steel is to blame here.

    AFAIK, Mauser NEVER made ANY firearms out of stainless steel.

    tac
    Good to know. I'm still very knew to firearms, mausers, & the metallurgy involved.
    So can I assume that most of these "in the white" bolts are also just high chrome-content steel as well and slower to rust than regular steel? I'm guessing stainless rusts the slowest.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by BerkshireHunter View Post
    Good to know. I'm still very knew to firearms, mausers, & the metallurgy involved.
    So can I assume that most of these "in the white" bolts are also just high chrome-content steel as well and slower to rust than regular steel? I'm guessing stainless rusts the slowest.

    No, the receivers and bolts are not stainless steel, they are polished/burnished carbon steel. They will rust and discolor but due to the high degree of finish, they are relatively easy to keep clean. AFAIK, there is no chromium in the mix of the steel used.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TP View Post
    No, the receivers and bolts are not stainless steel, they are polished/burnished carbon steel. They will rust and discolor but due to the high degree of finish, they are relatively easy to keep clean. AFAIK, there is no chromium in the mix of the steel used.
    Thanks, shall be noted.

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    Very beautiful rifle. IMHO, the quality of the SA Mausers is pre-dated by the Mauser M71/84.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCQueenie View Post
    Very beautiful rifle. IMHO, the quality of the SA Mausers is pre-dated by the Mauser M71/84.
    The 71/84 rifles are also very beautiful and nothing but quality.



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  16. #16
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    And I love the walnut!
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    You are just being a showoff because you have a gorgeous rifle. I'm glad you did, thanks!!!!
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    Absolutely beautiful rifles! I love the old mausers, simple, yet very elegant. Thanks for sharing!

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    My God.
    I forgot how much I want a minty 71/84.
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  20. #20
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    Guys: There at least several way to fire blue, Nitre is the messiest, hot metal Lead/Tin is easier, Dry Frunace, Oil/Tar burn off and others. Ordinary steel turns blue like the sight slider above at a range of 490-510 Deg F The straw thru the red are at lower temps....Don't try this at home...

    Dale
    "If those sweethearts won't face German bullets, Then they'll face French ones!"

  21. #21
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    Ok, I gotta show off a little too.

    Loewes 1891 Argy

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  22. #22
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    thats sweet. thanks for sharing. It character features like that, that make older firearms special.

  23. #23
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    "The point of bluing is to bind iron atoms. Iron atoms that are not bound, will react with oxygen and form iron oxide also known as rust.

    Bluing is a type of rust only in this case it is controlled rusting with the goal of preventing uncontrolled rusting which is reaction of oxygen with iron in iron objects and steel object.

    Do you oil your knives? Why? To keep oxygen away from iron."

    That's why they call it "Rust Blueing". I use Birchwood Casey's "gun blue" on some metal cabinet/furniture hardware to give it an aged look. Dark brown paste wax works great to give the parts a protective sheen; but if left alone, the parts will be coated with rust! A bit off-subject, but I have blued most of my woodworking tools as well!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool Wall..jpg  

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CabinetMikeD View Post
    A bit off-subject, but I have blued most of my woodworking tools as well!
    You are a man on a mission!

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