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Thread: Stevens 520-30

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    2

    Default Stevens 520-30

    I have a Stevens 520-30 serial number 60xxx curious if anyone here could tell me a little more about it. I cant find anywhere that gives info on serial number ranges. Any info would be much appreciated.








  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Greeley, CO
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    255

    Default

    I looked some time ago. I have a civilian Stevens 520 and wanted to know date of manufacture. Sorry, I came up with nothin. Your looks great, btw.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Looks like you have a very nice Stevens Model 520 trench shotgun. It was made during WW2, probably in 1943. It should have a small "US" mark on the left side of the receiver towards the rear.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    1,128

    Default

    HI Greezbe,
    Your Stevens 520-30 was offered by Stevens throughout much of the nineteen thirties. It was the successor to the Model 520 and can be easily distinguished from the two step receiver top of that earlier model. Your model was succeeded by the Model 620 which joined the sloped receiver pattern common to almost all pump shotguns. The 520-30 was considred an inexpensive model and was also offered by Montgomery Wards and Sears. I own three of these guns in 12, 16 and 20 gauges. I find that they are actualy quite well built, finished and seem exemplary of good quality of wrokmanship in their era. While I'm not qualified to assess the engineering aspect. Each of mine function reliably and I like their aesthetics. I understand that some of these guns were assembled against existing spare parts stocks and furnished to the military in early WWII. By all appearances, your gun is a sporting model that has had the barrel cut and been fitted with the military style barrel shroud assembly. I,m unaware of any source of authoritative serial number information for these pieces.
    I hope this general information helps
    My take.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Iskra, I'm not sure why you think greezeb's 520 was a sporting model that has had the barrel cut down.

    The serial number of his 520 is right in the known serial number range of the WW2 Military 520-30 trench guns. Also, it has the P proof marks and Ordnance bomb marks on the left side of the receiver and on the right rear side of the barrel just like the trench guns do. The Military riot guns and long barreled trainers have these marks on the same side.

    IMO, it a real WW2 520-30 trench gun.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,455

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    Tom D

    You are right, this is a nice and desirable military firearm.

    I have one similar to this (P and Flaming bomb) on the receiver but it has a long barrel.

    Is there anyway to tell if it was a trainer or one of the short barreled guns someone put a 'hunting' barrel on after they were sold?

    Were the marks only on the receiver? Anything on the barrel?

    thanks,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,455

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    greezeb

    A great book on military shotguns used by the US is Bruce Canfield's UNITED STATES COMBAT SHOTGUNS.

    It has several pages devoted to the model you have and is a very interesting book.

    You might try to find a copy.

    The Stevens is probably the most common trench gun model and less valuable than a M-97 or M-10 but is still a very desirable collectable.

    Tom D is on target about your serial number.

    Canfield reports numbers range from 38,000 to 70,000 with most WWII guns running from 40,000 to the 60,000's.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    344

    Default

    NY50/70, check to see if the serial number on the barrel matches the receiver. The number is located on the barrel head in the action bar slot. You have to remove the barrel assembly from the receiver to see it. If the numbers match, then it most likely is the original barrel.

    Also check to see if there is a small P proof mark and small Ordnance flaming bomb mark on either side of the barrel head near the receiver.

    And, can you give us an idea of your gun's serial number? Because the early made guns were marked differently than the later made ones.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    676

    Default

    That 520-30 is beautiful, looks original too.....I sold mine about 4yrs ago for $600 and it didnt have the handguard although the barrel was cut for the screws. I'd put the value of yours in the $800-$1000 range if its U.S. marked

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, Florida
    Posts
    395

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    Greezeb,

    Does the barrel have the writting on the left side partialy under the heat shield or is it all beind the heat shield and the receiver? I have one that has been through the arsenal, parkerized and heat shield but the writting on the barrel is under the heat shield which means it was originaly a riot gun and not a trench guns. 520-30 trench guns used a barrel that had the writting slightly more to the rear so the heat shield did not cover it. If the writting is not covered it is a correct trenchgun barrel.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    146

    Default

    Did any of these 520-30 US-marked shotguns come with a checkered stock? Or would the checkering have been added later?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Some of the early 520 US Military riot guns had checkered wood.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    146

    Default

    Thanks. Does the butt stock on this shotgun look right? See how the bottom of the butt stock (not at the butt plate) flares out as it approaches the butt plate? Is that what it is supposed to look like?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    676

    Default

    It could very well be an original set of wood. Many Riot Guns, not just Stevens, of that period had checkerd "sporting" type wood.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    344

    Default

    AFAIK. the bottom of the buttstock from the bottom of the pistol grip going back to the buttplate should be a straight line (no flare). Does the buttstock serial number match the gun? You have to remove the buttstock to see the number which is located in the tang slot.

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