Chinese Origin Mauser Stock Engraving ID
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Thread: Chinese Origin Mauser Stock Engraving ID

  1. #1
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    Default Chinese Origin Mauser Stock Engraving ID

    This is a thread to gather all stock and metal engraving infomation on Chinese origin rifles. I myself and others who can read Chinese will attempt to provide translation and hopefully other info related to the item. Hopefully others with similar branding can obtain info from this post.

    Please post pic of your items with Chinese writings.

    I'll start with 2:


    This is found on a T77 rifle manufactured by Zhe Jiang Iron Works during the War, it is a copy of the FN 1930. The exact origin of this militia unit is un-resolved.
    Chinese can be read from right or left depends on when it was done. So it could be He Nan Militia or Nan He Militia.
    Background: Usually the militia unit is a local org, not provincial. There is no other sample that had the provincial name associated directly with militia found yet.

    This is found on a FN 1938 rifle. It is most likely branded during the War by the military unit which this rifle was assigned to.

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    Thanks for starting this Firearms. Instant sticky.

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    Great Idea Firearms. I have always wondered what the cartouche on my rifle meant.

    Here's mine.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's a FN Model 1930

    Besides the marking on the butt someone also craved 2 characters into the handguard between the receiver and rear sight.
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    A friend of mine from Tiawan said that the character on the butt may mean "Luck" but he wasn't sure. He also said that it looked like it might be Japanese. At that point in time I hadn't even seen the characters on the handguard.

    Thanks,
    765mm

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    those are tough, 765. the handguard characters are hand carved, and are a personal name. the family name at the top is recognisable, but the lower character is not known. the stamp on the buttstock is not a recognised character, so is a symbol of some kind.

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    here's some pix of the current chinese militia. the girls pictured are in the beijing rose militia:

    "The two leaders in front, Zhao Na and Zhang Xiaofei, come from the Zhonghua Women's Academy who major in ad modeling and image design. They postponed their graduation because they wanted to participate in the military parade."

    http://www.zonaeuropa.com/20091002_1.htm
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20091002_07..jpg  

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    figured i'd add mine in here ,,on a fn mauser md 30..justashooter said mine means army.,,accepted,,,,jian
    crazy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chinese fn2..jpg  

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    My best guest on this one is that it is "Chun" done in artistic way, it is probably a place name. The carving on the hand is "Yu Chun" which means at the Chun place. The 2nd word defied the Chinese writing principal so it is probably done by someone who is not really literate and done it wrong.

    This one is "Ping" which is probably a place name. "Wu" which is Armed. "Jian" which is check or inspect. I think it means the "Armed Militiia Check Point at Ping". "Accepted" usually is another word "Yan" or "Qi" that are commonly encoutnered.

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    The Mauser rifle that I have here has a Chinese brand on the stock and on the receiver there are small suns or sunbursts on the side at the woodline. there is no date stamp on the rifle, only the Mauser
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    banner on the top of the receiver and 7.92. I have been told it was made in the early 30's according to Ball's Mauser book.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunkysdad View Post
    The Mauser rifle that I have here has a Chinese brand on the stock and on the receiver there are small suns or sunbursts on the side at the woodline. there is no date stamp on the rifle, only the Mauser
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Same as the above "Keep & Utilized" except the photo is upside down.
    These 98k configured rifles went to China in 1937-1938 and had 12-point sun star on both side of the receiver ring, barrel s/n and several places on stock (grip, main butt body, etc.)
    The 12-point sun is the national symbol of Republic of China, still in use in Taiwan today.

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    the 12 point sun is the symbol of the kuomintang party, which was in power on the mainland until the communists pushed the KMT out in 1946-49.
    it was the symbol for china from the mid 20's until the liberation. it remains the symbol for taiwan, as KMT is the reigning political power in taiwan.

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    Wow folks thank you for the Translations!..I love my Chinese Mauser and would appreciate any help you can give ..I've got a little custom stock work on mine as well as a bunch of markings.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 377.jpg   381.jpg   383.jpg   378.jpg  

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    The imprint is too light, I can't make out much. The first pic I can see "Armed", I can't tell the locality.
    However, you do have a great ZZS specimen. It is one of the last produced in the 1st Arsenal(old Hanyang) before it got shut down(O series, correct?). Today, the 1st is the Factory 296, well known for the 26 marking on NDM-86, SKS, AK, etc.

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    Thanks very much!..Those pics are old and I'm a little better with the camera now. I will try and see if some diff. angles and lighting will bring out some of the markings better. I bought this on Auction arms some years back and the seller never mentioned the stock work or pictured it..He must have thought I was crazy when I wrote him a big thank you note and told him how much I enjoyed it..Price was really more than fair and he made no illusions to it being minty LOL

    Thanks again!

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    Here are some markings on my P-series VZ24. I know the two small markings mean first and third but the large symbol is as yet unknown.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chinese VZ24 1.JPG   Chinese VZ24 3.JPG   Chinese VZ24 4.JPG   Chinese VZ24 10.JPG   Chinese VZ24 11.JPG   Chinese VZ24 7.JPG  

    Chinese VZ24 8.JPG   Chinese VZ24 9.JPG  
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

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    This is on a 1937 dated VZ 24 Mauser. Hope this works

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    On the left, it is the same as the 2nd pic I posted in the begining of this thread but writtern vertically - Keep and Utilized.
    On the right, again, written vertically - Training.

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    Default Here's two.

    Two stocks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails P5170526_edited.jpg  

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    On the left, the 3 characters are "Ren Wu Bu", written vertically, People's Armed Dept or Armed People's Militia Dept.
    In the Star, it's "Gong", usually short for "Gong An" - Police.

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    Thank you!

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    Does any one know what this means?

    The full post in military mausers:

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...27#post1375927

    Thanks for your help,

    M
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC_0599.jpg   IMG_0487.jpg   IMG_0479.jpg   IMG_0485.jpg  

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    "Jiao Lian" left to right in simplified form. It is applied by the militia after mid-50s. Jiao means teach and Lian means practice. Basically it is for training purpose. The 98k was one of those imported between 1937-1939 for the Nationalist Government.

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    does this make this a significant historical piece? Is it unusual? even though it is a trainer?

    Thanks for your input!

    M

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    Firearms,

    Could you help me interpret these dates you gave me?:

    "The 98k was one of those imported between 1937-1939 for the Nationalist Government."

    "It ("Jiao Lian") is applied by the militia after mid-50s."

    How does this apply to my rifle... regarding the date.

    As I understand the 98k was produced for much longer period, although, not through to the '50s (I don't mean to be a smart-ass, I'm just ignorant). How does this period associate with the '50s militia?

    I will require a more accurate history... if you could provide one.

    Thank you for the info provided,

    Mikliska

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikliska View Post
    Firearms,

    Could you help me interpret these dates you gave me?:

    "The 98k was one of those imported between 1937-1939 for the Nationalist Government."

    "It ("Jiao Lian") is applied by the militia after mid-50s."

    How does this apply to my rifle... regarding the date.

    As I understand the 98k was produced for much longer period, although, not through to the '50s (I don't mean to be a smart-ass, I'm just ignorant). How does this period associate with the '50s militia?

    I will require a more accurate history... if you could provide one.

    Thank you for the info provided,

    Mikliska
    The militia markings were put on all the different models of Chinese Mausers long after they were imported or made. When the Army got the Type 56 SKS and Type 56 AK, the militia got the Mausers.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

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    Default Chinese k98 Stock Markings

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    Posted this on the k98 forum but was told that there would be interest here on the stock marking.
    A recently picked up 1937 Chinese contract k98.
    An all matching rifle except for the follower and cleaning rod.
    I assumed that the added stock finish (shellac?) was added by a previous owner but I've been told that this could have been period applied in order to protect the wood. Any one ever hear of this?
    Mauser banner stock with 2 Chinese sunbursts on right side and one on the pistol grip.
    Thanks for looking.
    Mark

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    Default Stock Markings on Chinese Standard Modell Rifle

    These markings are on a rifle made c. 1935.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chinese Standard Modell 5.JPG   Chinese Standard Modell 6.JPG   Chinese Standard Modell 1.JPG  
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mgpellet0815 View Post
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    Posted this on the k98 forum but was told that there would be interest here on the stock marking.
    A recently picked up 1937 Chinese contract k98.
    An all matching rifle except for the follower and cleaning rod.
    I assumed that the added stock finish (shellac?) was added by a previous owner but I've been told that this could have been period applied in order to protect the wood. Any one ever hear of this?
    Mauser banner stock with 2 Chinese sunbursts on right side and one on the pistol grip.
    Thanks for looking.
    Mark
    Congratulation, very nice gun. The Sun burst mark towards the butt plate on the 4th pic appears to be added by someone other than Mauser.

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    Other than being Chinese, I have no idea.

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    We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore is not an act, but a habit- -- Aristotle

    Looking for cocking sleeve #75.

  30. #29
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    The stock marked "Keep and Utilize", it's upside down as shown in the pic.
    The rifle is a Zhong Zheng Shi rifle made by the 21st Arsenal in Chungking, can't tell the year without the s/n.

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    Not a mouser but I have a No4 Lee Enfield buttstock with chinese characters. translated to "for instructional purpose"

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    Those were issued in India to the Chinese Expedition Forces before the US M1917 were available. They kept some and brought them back to China after Burma Campaign.

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    Default Oil bottle

    At bit OT, but I'd like some help with this oil bottle, over at http://browningmgs.com/OilBottles.

    The left side reads 'you hu' 油壶 (oil bottle) and the 'bu' 步 over 'chong' 冲 I take to be an abbreviation for 'bu bing' 步兵 (infantry) and 'chongfeng qiang' 冲锋枪 (assault rifle) or some compound for 'assault infantry' or some such.

    The RHS has me stumped. I think it is 'hu' 互 or similar and 'tian' 田, but I have no idea what this might refer to. A place or a factory?



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    "Bu Chong" means that it is used for both SMG(or T56 as they label it) and rilfe. On the right side I see "Jun Yong"-"Military Use".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Firearms View Post
    " On the right side I see "Jun Yong"-"Military Use".
    Thanks for the call, but no, I don't see that at all. I still see 'hu' 互(mutual). Maybe it is a very squashed 'yong' 用. 'Hu yong' would fit the context of the other side. "Mutual use" for both SMG and rifle.


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    Check out the middle 2 strokes, they penertrate and the left stroke connects down:

    [edit to show pic]

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    OK I might buy that, maybe 'jun' but it doesn't have the 撇 on either side of the top stroke. 我已经问了一位中文教授,但是他也看不清楚。 或者我要问个书法家。。。


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  38. #37
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    Look at that "Hu" character, it didn't have the two downward strokes either. These things are somewhat stylish - based on the designer's inspiration of the moment of course. Have you seen the Type 77 receiver marking? It took me a few months to figure it out and I was the first one to do so. Not to mention the marking on Type 17 pistol from Shenxi. I finally confirmed it using the book published in Han dynasty that it's Type 17.

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    I have four Chinese used rifles. One 1888 Commission type rifle, one VZ24 Mauser and two Chinese manufactured 98 Rifles. I will post photos of markings later.

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    I am a novice with the Chinese Mauser's so I know very little. What is the significance of the swastika on some of the Chinese produced rifles. I have one such rifle that is serialed numberH8106 that has the swastika in the breech logo, on the side of the breech and on the trigger guard. Can anyone help me. Sorry any stock markings are too light to make out. Thanks

  41. #40
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    The reverse swastika was a common asian symbol (and common in other cultures as well). One of the Chinese Arsenals (21st?) used it as a logo. Someone who remembers which one will be along shortly to tell you and save me the effort of looking it up.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

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    卍 symbol was used by 21st Arsenal as noted above. Interestingly, the direction was reversed in the 20s and later changed - to avoid association with Nazi?
    It's commonly used by Buddhist to symbolize heart of Buddha/love of Buddha. It’s also common in India and Tibet as a symbol of Sun. Even today, it’s still widely in use. A co-worker (a Jew) one day came into office shaking and said there was a car marked with Swastika in the parking lot. I walked out with him to see, it was reversed like the one in the beginning of the post with dots in four quadrants. I told him that’s a blessing on the car and it’s a religious thing. He won’t believe me so I went online and find a pic of a Tibetan house with the exact symbol painted on the front door.

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    Thanks guys. I realize the Nazi's gave the ancient symbol a bad reputation. I have been a long time collector of American Volunteer Group artifacts. The late WWII fighter ace for the AVG, Flying Tigers, Tex Hill was a personal friend. It is only recently I got interested in the Chinese Mauser rifles from WWII. Just another tie to the forgotten theater of war.

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    The first is a stock from a Vz 24 I recently posted in the Military Mausers forum, I believe it is the same as some above markings, being keep and utilize. The next is a mark on the bottom of the pistol grip area of the stock, I would like to know what it is. Its hard to see in my pic, it looks like a circle with a Y in it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails VZ 24 013.JPG   Vz grip mark.JPG  

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    You're correct on the first one. The second one is not a Chinese character, it's more like a symbol but I don't know what it means.

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    Ok thanks alot, and that makes two of us on the symbol.

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