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Thread: Anyone know much about the Remington Model 721?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    894

    Default Anyone know much about the Remington Model 721?

    I love the looks of a plain walnut stock and the Model 721 is, in my opinion, a nice looking rifle. But I know very little about it. I've spotted a couple at my local pawn shop but one has a scope on it - the other doesn't but the stock has been ruined. Ruined in the sense that someone with no checkering experience tried to checker the forend and grip. It looks like my cat used it for a scratching post.

    Does anyone know whether or not some of the 721s came factory drilled and tapped or is this something someone had done? The scope is a cheap Western Field 3x9. If I had confidence that it was factory drilled and tapped, I wouldn't mind it. It also has sling swivels but whoever did it, did a good job. Nothing else has been done to it and the wood and metal look great.

    Any suggestions on what a fair price would be to pay out for one of these? Oh, and the caliber is .30-'06 which seems to be a super common chambering for that particular rifle. Anyone here own one and can speak for its strengths/weaknesses?

    Any information is appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Roswell, New Mexico
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    560

    Default

    A 721 in .30-06 was my first centerfire rifle in 1959. Sorry that I no longer have it.

    All of these 721/722's were factory drilled and tapped for scope mounts. As to value, Gunbroker auction site recently had a 722 in .257 Roberts that went for over $400 w/o scope. I'd expect a bare .30-06 would bring $300.
    "You may fire when ready, Gridley" (Admiral Dewey at Manila Bay)

  3. #3
    2520wcf Guest

    Default

    Basically the plain "father of the 700"; just as strong, just as accurate. Probably not too hard to find a stock for it either; they were very popular in their day and willl last basically forever if you take care of the bore and chamber. I never found checkering as pretty or as functional as we now seem to think it is. (Funny, they managed without it for MANY decades.....deer still got kilt!).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    991

    Default The Remington 721 & 722

    The Remingtons 721 & 722 hit the market in 1948. The very early production numbers were NOT tapped on the receiver bridge top. Ala the prewar Winchesters, they were tapped on the receiver ring top and the bridge side. These early models also had their serial numbers located within the receiver in the left bolt guide rail. The chances of running into one of these semi-tapped models is really so small, it can almost be said that they are 'all' D&T for top mount scopes in the conventional manner.
    They were fine and innovative guns in any sense but particularly within their price point. They are also strong and durable rifles. Plain by most standards, they were a successful 'function over form' marketing strategy. The later Remington 725 was their upscale counterpart. The 721-722 series died peacefully with the intro of the 700.
    There are still many good serviceable examples. Not an achilies heel, but a point to always check is the riveted in place extractor. If broken, replacements are extremely difficult to find and generally a headache not worth buying into! Stocks are available but unless a restoration is particularly desired, I have heard that the more attractive 700 series stocks can often be easily adapted. I do know that these are more available and generally can be found cheaper than the average 721/722 stocks. The 721/722 barrel boss must be fitted of course. (Also, supposedly the 700 bottom metal also generally works.) The best deals on these rifles seem to be just getting a good one at a few hundred dollars in 30-06 or 270 Winchester. Other chamberings are potentially more expensive depending on desirability. Also except perhaps the 300 H&H, the 722 usually sells for more than the 721. That shorter action is still appreciated.
    I have owned a few of them and recently picked up a very decent 721 in 300 H&H, their largest factory offering and the only chambering offering a factory recoil pad.
    Hope these ramblings help and...
    My take!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Laramie, WY area.
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    Default

    There was a Model 721B version that did come with factory checkering and sling swivels. My first.30/06 was a 721B and it was very accurate. I traded it for a .243 Win in a pre-64 Model 70 which was only half as good a shooter. Iskra provides a good tip about the extractor; I think they may well have been more durable than the 700 design but they are different and if one is broken you will probably end up having a Sako type extractor fitted which is expensive. Mostly only target shooters ever broke an extractor though. I like the "no-nonsense" styling also.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    894

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    Thanks for the replies... I had been wanting a bolt action "shooter" in .30-'06 so I ended up buying another gun at the same pawn shop. I knew if I bought the 721, I would put it away and never shoot it. I am going to search the shows for a nice 721, though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    1

    Default

    I bought a used remington 721 30-06 from badger john, not knowing much about guns. Simply because i didn't want to get an expensive one for start. Anyway, the gun was beat up pretty bad. Had major skars on the stock and barrel. I figure the guns been through hell, why not see why, i ask myself. So i bought it for $199. Did some major sanding and glossing. It actually turned out nice. Got a sling for it, bought a cheap scope, and some generic bullets from wal-mart. Took it out the following season and harvest a 4x4 and a 3x4 that year. One shot kill. Didn't matter where it hits. It perform amazingly well. I would not sell it for any price. I've had this gun for three years now, and every year i bagged two deers each. And i've also noticed that it is about an inch or so longer than my friends. Good for longer distance shot.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    20

    Default 721

    Sorry to bring this thread back up, but do any of you know if all of the 721's are the same length action. I know that they made .264, .270, .30-06, and .300 H&H in the 721. I know that the .300 H&H is much longer than the other three, but I can't find anything to say that there was more than one action length. I would like to get one in .30-06 and rechamber it to .300 H&H if the actions are a universal long action.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    2

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    So I happen to have one of these 721 semi tapped models in 30-06 with the serial # stamped into the inside left of the reciever with a 28xxx serial #. the Date stamp is amm the best I can figure, but that puts date of manufacture at march of 1943??? Can anyone help me make heads or tales of this??

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