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  1. #1

    Question Current M1 Garand prices

    Hello to all,
    I am shopping for an M1 Garand and just wanted your opinions as to what the going prices are right now ( not the asking prices). I watch GB from time to time and the prices seem to be all over the place. I'd like a WW2 dated receiver and barrel in good shape. The years on the barrel and receiver don't necessarily have to be the same, but between 1941 and 1945. The internal parts from the same armory. As long as they fit in the WW2 years, its ok if they aren't original to the rifle. Some on GB that fit my description seem to go for approx 750 - 1000.00, but I have seen some guys price them at 1750.00 to 2000.00 I just wanted to know what the difference is that would justify the higher prices for these rifles. I don't want to over pay. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    548

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    Late war Springfield restorations (w/ wartime barrels and proper code parts for the date) with mismatch stocks slightly below $1k. Late war period correct parts with correct stocks (no rebuild marks) $1,350 or so. You'd be best looking for 3.7-3.8 million Springfields. These can still be found in the CMP stores on a good/lucky day. From there it's parts swapping to make a wartime all SA gun. Proper stocks with rebuild marks can be found with a little patience. Wartime stocks without rebuild marks are dear indeed. Likewise early unmodified Op Rods. Forget Winchesters, the prices are nuts.

    I just sold a restoration 3.7m Springfield with all correct parts (tho' not matching finish) and an nice NFR lineout stock for $1,250 if that helps place the market (at least in Southern Cal) for you.

    Just my 2 cents, others may disagree.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    383

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    I'll agree with T308. A late war Springfield might be your best bet. Parts are cheaper. Look for a gun that already has the right barrel, stock, rear sight, and op rod on it that you want. Other parts are cheaper and easier to correct if you choose to do so.

    $750-950 is the right range. I've been "restoring" a 1.66 mil Springfield for years. It gets discouraging. Finding all the correct parts, then the finish doesn't look right. Parts are expensive. Stocks are rediculous. Much more money into it than what its worth. I'm beginning to not care about it being "correct".

    On the plus side, hunting those parts to correct your rifle is all part of the fun. I like to call it the "lay-away plan". You only spend a little at a time doing it, as you save the money. EVENTUALLY, you get what you want.

    Or just save the money, and wait for the perfect gun for you. I love a gun that has a slight, even finish wear, throughout. It's out there. You just have to look, alot!

  4. #4

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    Although I mainly deal with M1903s, I agree with Mike that restoring a M1 (or M1903, for that matter) is becoming increasingly difficult and expensive. He mentioned, even if you find the right parts, the finish doesn't usually match. I have gotten very careful about undertaking a restoration. My advice is to find a rifle that is close and then just keep your eyes open without making it a "burning desire" project.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    997

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    If you have the funds always buy the best rifle you can afford.If I was going to buy big money Garands I would buy a couple of books on them so that I could spot a humped up rifle.Guys Fake stock stampings etc.Know what your looking at before you shop.Consider a CMP rifle.Very fair price.They have several grades with several prices.My 2 Garands are mix masters,WW11 receivers with Korean war date barrels.Nothing fancy stocks,but whos to say that their parts didnt make history happen somewhere?I can shoot the heck out of them with out hurting their value.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    North of the Great White North
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    6,156

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    How about an M1D built on a Winchester receiver? What price?
    Geal ‘us dearg a suas!

    Member since Gunboards v1.0

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    548

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    Scott Duff has a non papered Winnie 1D for $2895.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    North of the Great White North
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    Wow...I wonder what it is worth with the CMP papers?
    Geal ‘us dearg a suas!

    Member since Gunboards v1.0

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12

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    A papered Win M1D should push the prices into the low to mid-$4K range unless it is a new rebuild, which could go over the rainbow into the stratosphere. Win's are out of sight. No other way to say it.

  10. #10

    Default

    Go the CMP route if you qualify. I've found that on the whole, Garands and Carbines are vastly overpriced at gunshows and at shops when compared to the CMP. Just the other week I was in a shop that wanted $1200 firm for a rifle that seemed worth half the price! They also had Blue Sky import Carbines for some $600 and the quality of those vary from decent to parts guns.

    In any case CMP will give you a great weapon for an even better price. I almost bought a Garand at a show, thinking I didn't qualify for the CMP, but I decided to make sure and it turns out I did! For $500 I got a great rifle made on a pre World War II era receiver (September 1941), which is exactly what I wanted. If you order through the mail you can request certain things and while it's not always assured you will get what you ask for there is a good chance they will try to meet your basic request if you ask for a rifle within a certain serial number range and not just for a World War II receiver. If you go to the store you can personally choose your own rifle and take it home with you without any FFL transfer required! If you really want a Garand I suggest you look into the CMP. I really can't praise them enough, haha!

    It might be a bit difficult to meet all of your specific requests, especially for a good condition WWII barrel since a good deal of them were shot out after the war and replaced in the 1950's. If that's the case and you truly want a rifle with mostly WWII era parts, you probably will have to go through GunBroker or another similar site. That will definitely cost a good deal more to get such a rifle, haha!

    Hope this helps!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    6

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    I know that this is an extremely old Post, but with the renewed interest in the WW11 stuff, I thought that I would jump in. I have a completely original 1-1943 M1 Garand that I have had for several years. I had someone ask me to sell it to them. I told them that it wasn't for sale. They wanted me to put a price on it so I just said that I wouldn't sell it for $5,000.00. I know that if you don't want to sell something, don't put a price on it. Do you think that someone would want an M1 garand bad enough to pay that much? I am sorry that I even said anything about a price now. What is top dollar for an M1 Garand today? Mine has barrel erosion of just barely 1 and throat erosion of less than 1 and the bore is very bright.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6

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    CMP Service Grade Garands are $625 while the Special Grades are $995 as of November 2013. Selling either of these in the open market would easily go for 25 to 50% more.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Northwest Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by A J View Post
    CMP Service Grade Garands are $625 while the Special Grades are $995 as of November 2013. Selling either of these in the open market would easily go for 25 to 50% more.
    Selling for 25% to 50% more, maybe UNLESS you beat the seller over the head with the CMP price for the equivalent gun. Doing this should prove to the seller that you are not a TOTAL Rube, and more often than not, should earn you a significant discount on his price. It will all depend on how much he wants the money.

    Personally, I wouldn't pay anything over 10% above the current CMP price for the equivalent rifle.

  14. #14

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    If it helps at all, last year I paid $950 for a 2,xxx, xxx Springfield garand at a gun show. Pretty pricy, but it came with lockbar sights, correct internals, uncut oprod. The only things incorrect were stock and barrel ('52). Even though $950 is high, with all the early parts, I feel it was worth it.


    M1/M3 Carbine: late '44 Inland
    M1 Garand: late '44 Springfield

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Michigan
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    6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronbo6 View Post
    Selling for 25% to 50% more, maybe UNLESS you beat the seller over the head with the CMP price for the equivalent gun. Doing this should prove to the seller that you are not a TOTAL Rube, and more often than not, should earn you a significant discount on his price. It will all depend on how much he wants the money.

    Personally, I wouldn't pay anything over 10% above the current CMP price for the equivalent rifle.
    On second thought, you're probably more accurate. Right now the market will probably only go 10-25% over CMP price and that varies wildly. I can understand someone going over the CMP price simply due to a bit less wait and hassle factor.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Middle TN
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    635

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    I recently paid $950 or so for a CMP Service/Special matching HRA that had a new CMP stock. And they were all CMP south had on display for sale, outside of sniper variations. Was worth the cost and I found a very nice HRA hand pick stock at Sarco to go with it.
    U.S Navy 74-93 Retired CPO
    USMC 70-74

    Never hurts to be polite but can be painful as hell to be rude

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    NC
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    8,621

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    Quote Originally Posted by garrettbragg View Post
    If it helps at all, last year I paid $950 for a 2,xxx, xxx Springfield garand at a gun show. Pretty pricy, but it came with lockbar sights, correct internals, uncut oprod. The only things incorrect were stock and barrel ('52). Even though $950 is high, with all the early parts, I feel it was worth it.


    M1/M3 Carbine: late '44 Inland
    M1 Garand: late '44 Springfield
    There would have to be serious problems with the rifle for $950 to be high. If not, that is a screaming deal on a WW2 rifle, which often be seen priced at$1500. I would want that before 2 two service grades personally.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Ohio
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    1,367

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    Asking price and selling price are two complete different things.
    I just bought a completely correct 1943 for $1300 and a completely correct 1941 $1500

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