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  1. #1
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    Default "Dreyse" or "Dryse"

    I've run across both spellings in the literature. I assume the rifle was named after the inventor, how was his name spelled?

  2. #2
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    His name is "Johann Nikolaus von Dreyse".

    (November 20, 1787 - December 9, 1867), was a German firearms inventor and manufacturer born in Sömmerda, Germany, the son of a locksmith. He is most famous for producing the "Needle gun" in 1836, which was eventually adopted by the Prussian army for service in 1841 as the Dreyse Zundnadelgewehr, or Prussian Model 1849.

    Dreyse worked from 1809 to 1814 in the Parisian gun factory of Jean-Samuel Pauly, a Swiss who designed several experimental breech-loading military rifles. Returning to Sömmerda, he in 1824 founded a company to manufacture percussion caps. It was there that he designed the needle rifle.

    While the gun is thought of by some to be the first bolt-action rifle, in reality, this rifle bears very little resemblance to modern bolt-action rifles, but was distinct for its time.

    It was used by the Prussians in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 and in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. By this time, the gun was fast becoming obsolete, and was outclassed by the French chassepot. Many other designs of bolt action rifles had emerged, and many countries had standardized on their own versions (the British notably had a contest with over a hundred different prototype weapons).


    Unveiling of the Dreyse Memorial in Sömmerda, 1909 There remains some ambiguity about the activities of von Dreyse after he created the needle-gun, as he seems to have dropped the "Johann" part of his name and was known as Nikolaus von Dreyse.


    And No I'm not that smart....Just took this info from Wikipedia.

    Daniel
    If you have any info on the 503rd or Corregidor during WWII...lets talk

  3. #3
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    Apparently, the fledgling Japanese government in Wakayama had at least 3,000 of these zundnadelgewehr (Dreyse) rifles. See the link.

    http://www.wakayama-info.net/intl/ar..._12_001423.php

    C/
    Last edited by seinen; 12-19-2007 at 09:58 AM.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Yes, I've run across this in at least two Japanese histories. Unfortunately, I have the habit of writing the subject and page number in the front of the book. Most of my "writing" lately has been away from home and I grab the books I need, rather than all.

    The one with the Dreyse 3K purchase history, names the Han (clan) that bought them, indicates that Koppen was a German sgt. who somehow wrangled a trip with the rifles and mentions when the new IJA was formed they were incorporated into the army. Would guess that's why one complete (?) garrison was equipped with them.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin48 View Post
    The one with the Dreyse 3K purchase history, names the Han (clan) that bought them, indicates that Koppen was a German sgt. who somehow wrangled a trip with the rifles and mentions when the new IJA was formed they were incorporated into the army. Would guess that's why one complete (?) garrison was equipped with them.
    Makes sense that at least a few of these rifles would have survived to present day. Guess they're hidden away in vet's closets.

    C/

  6. #6
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    Ronin 48, I guess you'll have to buy the book to see what the bayonet looks like ;-) I bought one of these rare bayonets with a chrysanthemum stamped on the ricasso. I have also seen one with the serial number in kanji on the shank of the bayonet, also with the Chrysanthemum. These two bayonets were found in the wall of an old barn that was being torn down, and from what I have gathered from other bayonet collectors, the scabbard is worth more then the bayonet. After showing my bayonet to a well know collector/dealer, he took a picture of the scabbard and sent it to a friend in Germany. To bad they didn't hide a rifle or two with the bayonets. OK, just my two cents on the topic.
    Raymond

  7. #7
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    I guess this is what one of the non Japanese-marked examples looks like. Never saw one in the flesh before this listing.

    http://www.antiquefirearms.com/pages/409.htm

    C/

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