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Thread: Load recommendations for .36-cal BP revolver - using Pyrodex RS (FFG)?

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    Default Load recommendations for .36-cal BP revolver - using Pyrodex RS (FFG)?

    What is the recommended powder load range for a .36-cal Italian reproduction (steel frame) using Pyrodex RS (FFG)?
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    Pyrodex RS [RS stands for rifle and shotgun] is not a good choice for a handgun. That is why there is Pyrodex P - P for pistol/revolver.

    Hodgdons data book states that 21gr BY WEIGHT of Pyrodex P is a good load. If you have a BP measure that operates by weight, then set it to weigh 28gr.

    There is no documented data for shooting RS in a handgun.

    Others might able to help you out here, but I can't. Sorry.

    tac
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    Thanks, tac.
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    I often use P or pistol powder in my BP rifles and work up my own loads depending on bullet weight. Never had a problem using the finer pistol powder in rifles. Powder if FFFG.

    However, I have never heard of anyone using FFG rifle and shotgun powder in hand guns.

    If you pour out some of each type of powder on a table, the different grain size is very apparent.

    I don't know if there is a down side to using Rifle powder in the revolvers. I have never tried it. Seems like it would burn slower. Just a guess.

    For my .36 cal. I normally use 22 grains of BP FFFG. The spout on my brass powder unit will hold exactly 22 grains. Convenient.

    Same amount if I use Pyrodex or Tripple 7. I can telll the difference when I fire it.

    No problems so far with using this formula.

    I have also tried loading my .36 to the max. with BP. Meaning all the way full with just enough room for the lead.

    The latest .36 I bought is the short barreled 1862 .36 that Cabelas had on sale for under $200. Pietta and looks very well made, compared to some Piettas I have had. I load it to he max. just to see if it will shoot loose. With a full load the ball is moving right along. It is accurate at 50 yds. Suprising for a such a short barrel.

    So far I have not shot one loose, or had any damage.

    It gives the .36 some real ZING. I am going to chrono this load, as I am curious to how fast the .36 is kicking them out.

    Probably not a good idea if you have a nice .36 that you want to keep forever.

    Cabela has an instruction manual for BP.
    You can probably get one for free if you call customer service.

    It has a loading chart for BP.

    .36 BP 22 grains of FFFG.

    .36 Pyrodex 17 grains of P (pistol)


    The Pietta manual also has a chart, but the loads are WAYYY under what other charts have.
    Pietta manuals load info. is about 2/3 of what other charts have.

    They like their guns loaded puny, so they last longer I suppose.

    Also, brass framed guns should use lighter loads.

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    I've used RS in my .44 BP revolvers for years, and it seems to work just fine. I'm guessing the loads are more mild than what you all shoot, but it shoots well in my 1858 New Army, and the recoil is mild (particularly good when introducing newbies to blackpowder shooting).
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    I guess I am just getting old but I think BP guns should shoot BP, not this new fangled stuff that is terribly corrosive

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    TLJack, I actually never see true black powder for sale. It is not carried by any local shops.
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    You can use 2f in a revolver, it well burn slower and have less peak pressure. It may be slightly harder to ignite.

    A good starting point for a load is one half the caliber, ie a .36 start with 18grs and work up. Most of my .36's like 20-22 grs. You can not over charge a black powder revolver, chambers are to small. A full chamber is very seldom a accurate load but lots of smoke and flame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by madcratebuilder View Post
    You can use 2f in a revolver, it well burn slower and have less peak pressure. It may be slightly harder to ignite.

    A good starting point for a load is one half the caliber, ie a .36 start with 18grs and work up. Most of my .36's like 20-22 grs. You can not over charge a black powder revolver, chambers are to small. A full chamber is very seldom a accurate load but lots of smoke and flame.
    The folks who busted Walkers (cylinders and barrels, both) back in the day might not agree with that.

    I'd think either a Walker or Dragoon replica might like either Pyrodex RS or 2F BP better than 3F (which is what I use in my .36). I would not expect a .36 to need (or be happy with) either 2F BP or RS Pyrodex
    Last edited by Clyde; 10-06-2010 at 06:07 PM.
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    Bones92

    Check the NMLRA web site for a BP club near you. Also NSSA site. They will be able to supply you with Black powder. Do you have friends that shoot muzzle-loaders? If so see if you can do a group buy of BP from Grafs. That helps out on the hazardous material charge. By the way Swiss powder is the cleanest shooting and most consistent shooting.

    FWIW

    By the way, Madcrate is right you can't overload a revolver with black powder. Don't know about the wantabe powders. I don't use that corrosive crap.

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