Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 45 of 48
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default Remington mod. 700 controversy?

    CNBC aired this expose-type documentary yesterday about a number of lawsuits involving Remington Arms and the mod. 700 trigger mechanism. The show didn't strike me as your typical antigun, media hit-piece. It seems like there may be a problem.

    There are company memos going all the way back to the development stage that mention a "theoretical" unsafe condition. The original designer actually proposed a solution but it wasn't implemented for decades. Police and military snipers have complained of problems. And most of all, it may have contributed to two dozen civilian deaths (along with lack of muzzle discipline and failure to adhere to the rules of safe gun handling).

    At the heart of the decades-long controversy over the Remington 700 series is a piece of metal that is roughly the length of a paper clip.

    It is called a “trigger connector,” and it is an integral part of the firing mechanism patented by Remington engineer Merle “Mike” Walker in 1950. The so-called “Walker trigger” was a breakthrough in firearm design, allowing the smooth, crisp action favored by expert shooters at an affordable price.

    The connector is mounted on a spring inside the firing mechanism, sitting between the trigger and the sear—the metal bar that holds back the firing pin. According to Walker’s patent, the connector not only smoothes the action of the trigger, but also eliminates “trigger slap,” where the trigger bounces back slightly after the gun is fired.

    To this day, Walker calls his invention “a perfect trigger.” But multiple lawsuits against Remington allege the design is flawed. They claim small amounts of rust, debris, or even a small jolt can push the connector out of alignment, separating the trigger itself from the rest of the firing mechanism. Then, the complaints allege, the gun can go off when other parts are operated, such as the safety or the bolt.
    Full article describing the mod. 700 trigger design and accusations of safety issues:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/39743024?__so...y&par=usatoday

    What do the snipers and sniper aficionados think? If you watch the video at the above link, you can see law enforcement snipers demonstrating how the rifle can be made to fire without touching the trigger. I think everyone can agree that isn't a good thing.
    Last edited by Looter; 10-22-2010 at 02:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,035

    Default

    In my book, this is a non-issue. This is an old, typical anti-gun story, dug up and reprinted on the front pages two weeks before elections.

    None of these rifles would have killed anyone had a round not been chambered in them and the users not relying solely on a mechanical safety to prevent the rifle from firing. A round should only be chambered if you intend to destroy something. If you are walking around with any weapon's chamber loaded 'just because', be prepared for an inadvertent discharge. 'Nuff said.

    Keith

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trainsktg View Post
    In my book, this is a non-issue. This is an old, typical anti-gun story, dug up and reprinted on the front pages two weeks before elections.

    None of these rifles would have killed anyone had a round not been chambered in them and the users not relying solely on a mechanical safety to prevent the rifle from firing. A round should only be chambered if you intend to destroy something. If you are walking around with any weapon's chamber loaded 'just because', be prepared for an inadvertent discharge. 'Nuff said.
    I don't think it's unreasonable to expect a firearm to not fire when you take the safety off, or touch the bolt handle. This is the first I've heard of any potential safety issue with the 700s. I don't own one, that's why I ask.

    The USMC sniper school has confirmed they've had multiple incidents where their militarized 700s discharged unexpectedly on the firing line.

    If this is what's happening, to me it's worth discussing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,035

    Default

    I reread my post. I didn't mean to come off sounding hostile towards you. The issue of inadvertent firing with these rifles is a relevant one to discuss, and setting the triggers too light seem to be the major culprit. There was a rather lengthy discussion about the timing and the politics of this story in relation to the upcoming elections on another site and my passion carried over to this one.

    I'd be interested to hear what others who have an extensive background with this rifle design have to say about this issue. I do not, other than a general 'turn the key and drive' type of knowledge.

    Keith

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Keith: no problem. I appreciate the input, and look forward to hearing what others have to say as well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    Remington triggers going all the way back to the 721-722, and maybe before, can be screwed around with as far as adjustment to the point that these discharges will happen. The thing to do is read thge instructions and know what your doing before you start messing with them. Usually its the overtravel screw .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Most shooters are lucky if they can print 3moa at 100meters (95%) with a 700. Why in the world would they play with the trigger pull. Better yet , what kind of reasoning prompted Remington to put an adjustable unit in their main line of rifles. It would have been much safer and smarter to use a non adjustable unit and then to sell a adjustable drop in as an aftermarket unit
    to limit liability.. It was probably a trial lawyer suggestion.I agree with srinde , the design probably goes back a number of decades prior to thee trial lawyer era. They just never recognized that the world of liability had changed. Just poor management.
    Last edited by mjmd; 10-22-2010 at 11:24 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    They actually had a recall of the older trigger system 30 yrs or so back.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by srinde View Post
    They actually had a recall of the older trigger system 30 yrs or so back.
    are the overtravel screws still in them?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    1,920

    Default

    This problem has nothing to do with trigger adjustment. It is a design problem. My Rem Mod 700 in a .270 discharged a few times when safety was disingaged. I was able to recreate this malfunction alot over the years. Several pants shitting situations happened with that rifle and I am not happy about it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by srinde View Post
    They actually had a recall of the older trigger system 30 yrs or so back.
    What was the recall for? Remington still offers the Walker trigger, along side the X-mark Pro trigger, which was introduced in 2007. The X-mark Pro includes the added safety feature designed by Walker for the early 700-series rifles in 1948. It was not implemented at that time because of cost (5.5 cents per rifle, according to internal memos).

    You'd think these law enforcement and military organizations that have complained would have armorers competent enough to adjust a trigger without creating an unsafe condition. I don't believe it's merely an adjustment issue either.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    Remington recalled them due to trigger problems in 1979 and again in 1994.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Looter View Post
    You'd think these law enforcement and military organizations that have complained would have armorers competent enough to adjust a trigger without creating an unsafe condition. I don't believe it's merely an adjustment issue either.
    Military?...yes...Law Enforcement?..you have to be kidding.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    I see that they (Rem) in the past have put the blame on faulty "friction plates" inside the trigger mechanism. I still am willing to bet that a large number of accidental discharges are due to people messing with the adjustment on them. I have learned about them myself. I also have to agree with the above comment on organizational armorers.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Waco area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I would have to jump on board with the "inexperienced adjuster" thought process too. The 700 triggers, both walker and x mark pro's are quite adjustable, problem is that if you don't know what you are doing you can screw up your sear engagement and cause them to discharge upon closing the bolt. Anyone who has spent much time around guns would realize this is possible.
    Secondly, I am a former law-enforcement and military sniper. I 100% agree with mjmd's comment above. The military frequently (if not always) has some good hands servicing their weapons. Law-enforcement very rarely does, and to throw a bit more fuel on the fire, most law-enforcement officers (that I have had the pleasure of knowing) don't know their butt from a hole in the ground any more with firearms.
    I have seen some terrible cleaning procedures and some terrible modifications and maintenance performed on LE weapons over the years. The last police sniper shooting in the video on that link could very well have come about from a cruddy trigger job and improper cleaning technique. I know for a fact that many LE agencies will do their trigger work in house or have a local "gunsmith" do the work for them...and if you have been around the block a little you know how that can end up.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Central Joisey
    Posts
    713

    Default

    I placed this link in a previous post - but seems to have been lost

    It was on the NBC national news as well

    edit: http://www.nbc.com/news-sports/msnbc...-deadly-flaws/

    I owned, operated and had NO problems with several mod 700 remingtons. Seems like a crock of shirt to me, looking for the needle in the haystack.

    So be it with the chief - uh - anti-gun person in charge.
    Seen on U.S. Forces bumper sticker:
    Its Gods job to judge the terrorists, its our mission to arrange the meeting.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Northern Mississippi
    Posts
    1,756

    Default

    I have seen "adjustment problems" as a similiar cause for everything from old-style muzzle-loader rifles and pistols (with adjustable sear faces) to modern adjustable triggers in ALL weapons. People love to dick with things, then they wanna cry foul. Sks's...I've had people bring them in firing F/A because they "slicked-up the sear" a bit. SAME theory. Same result. The cause.....idiots with guns!

    I do thimk the military Snipers are actually having issues from the weapons being worn. They are fired more. Military armorers, especially those assigned to bravo 4's, are a little bit above average, if I may be allowed to say so. After all, there is a bit of pride involved, in that case....
    Last edited by TW1Kell; 10-22-2010 at 05:16 PM. Reason: typos
    Join the PSL Owners' Group. I'll approve you as soon as I see your request.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    I did not mean to disparage military armorers at all. Another factor with their (military) Remingtons having problems could also be dirt-sand.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    In the final analysis, firearms companies are like ladder companies. They get sued ten times a day. We have a major problem with the number of lawyers chasing ambulances these days and the Democrats just keep making it easier every year in Washington for them to bring an action.. The solution is simple, manufacture overseas beyond the reach of their litigation. There is no personal responsibility here anymore for anything. I dicked with my trigger and blew my leg off but it was not my fault. I am unsucessfull in life but that is someone elses fault. Time for remington to leave the U.S. Let zastava build everything or better yet the Chinese. They would appreciate the work .
    Last edited by mjmd; 10-22-2010 at 09:35 PM.

  20. #20

    Default

    i dont know if this is related but saw 2 different hunting shows recently where Remington rifles failed to fire.Both places were cold ,one was in Alaska the other in Mongolia or Russia but in both instances the rifles failed to fire.I dont know if any one else has seen either program.The shows did not get into the cause of failure and backup rifles were used in both cases.If I see them again I will make a note of which programs they are.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Mo.
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    If someone has either a .308 or 30-06 I'll buy the death trap cheap !!! LOL Midway is 10 minutes from the house and they have all kinds of replacement triggers.
    Vigilance in Living counteracts Stupidity in Dying
    Per Scintillam Flamma

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Crusher View Post
    If someone has either a .308 or 30-06 I'll buy the death trap cheap !!! LOL Midway is 10 minutes from the house and they have all kinds of replacement triggers.
    +1.
    , as always

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deutsche Vortrekker View Post
    i dont know if this is related but saw 2 different hunting shows recently where Remington rifles failed to fire.Both places were cold ,one was in Alaska the other in Mongolia or Russia but in both instances the rifles failed to fire.I dont know if any one else has seen either program.The shows did not get into the cause of failure and backup rifles were used in both cases.If I see them again I will make a note of which programs they are.
    just flood some oil in around the firing pin of a dirty rem 700 bolt to make it work a little better and then look for some cold weather.
    Last edited by mjmd; 10-22-2010 at 11:08 PM.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Waco area, Texas, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I personally think that the only thing Remington might be guilty of is sending rifles out of the factory with "lawyer weight" triggers, which gives people a temptation to screw with them.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigKev View Post
    I personally think that the only thing Remington might be guilty of is sending rifles out of the factory with "lawyer weight" triggers, which gives people a temptation to screw with them.
    i think the lawyers screw them up after the accidents

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    If someone was making a drop in Mauser style trigger system fo 700s they'd most likely make a fortune now ....

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mjmd View Post
    Military?...yes...Law Enforcement?..you have to be kidding.
    While I'm not eager to bash law enforcement, it's true, not all LEOs are knowledgeable about firearms. But, if someone is a sniper in a police Special Weapons and Tactics unit, you'd think they'd know something about their firearms.

    The reason this issue got my attention, and the reason I posted it here is because military snipers, Army, the USMC Sniper School have reported problems with their 700s. We have at least one senior member here who has experienced the same type of problem and believes it is something other than triggers that were "messed with". All of the law suits claim the rifles involved were unmodified.

    I wasn't aware the 700 came with an adjustable trigger. But, how does that explain what we see in the video? The LEO sniper appears to pull the trigger, he calls out a "no fire!" and then, when the bolt is touched, the rifle discharged.

    The firearms industry is different from the ladder industry (and every other consumer goods mfg. industry) in one way: it is protected from govt. safety regulation by the 2nd Amendment. This means the manufacturers essentially police themselves. And IMO we, as the shooting community, have a responsibility to analyze and discuss potential safety issues with firearms when questions arise.

    It was the reports from the military, and the actual internal company memos (which are available on the web) that convinced me there may be a problem with the design. Why, unless there was a potential safety issue, would Remington come out with a new 700 trigger in 2007 that incorporates the exact same safety feature that the original designer proposed in '48?

    As an aside, I also learned from this documentary that Remington Arms was purchased in 2007 by an investment firm that went around quietly buying up gun companies. Today, Remington is part on an umbrella corporation that also includes Bushmaster, Marlin, H&R, and DPMS/Panther Arms.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    149

    Default

    The problem with companies policing themselves is that greed in upper management outweighs common sense and safety concerns every time. If you have ever worked in American industry you already know this. The design may or may not be sound...but how many corners have been cut in the last decade or two to keep the rifle "affordable". How many people assembling these don't care...etc.
    Remington is stupid to continue manufacturng something with this many issues; especially dating back to 1948.
    Thanks, Smak

  29. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Looter View Post
    While I'm not eager to bash law enforcement, it's true, not all LEOs are knowledgeable about firearms. But, if someone is a sniper in a police Special Weapons and Tactics unit, you'd think they'd know something about their firearms.

    The reason this issue got my attention, and the reason I posted it here is because military snipers, Army, the USMC Sniper School have reported problems with their 700s. We have at least one senior member here who has experienced the same type of problem and believes it is something other than triggers that were "messed with". All of the law suits claim the rifles involved were unmodified.

    I wasn't aware the 700 came with an adjustable trigger. But, how does that explain what we see in the video? The LEO sniper appears to pull the trigger, he calls out a "no fire!" and then, when the bolt is touched, the rifle discharged.

    The firearms industry is different from the ladder industry (and every other consumer goods mfg. industry) in one way: it is protected from govt. safety regulation by the 2nd Amendment. This means the manufacturers essentially police themselves. And IMO we, as the shooting community, have a responsibility to analyze and discuss potential safety issues with firearms when questions arise.

    It was the reports from the military, and the actual internal company memos (which are available on the web) that convinced me there may be a problem with the design. Why, unless there was a potential safety issue, would Remington come out with a new 700 trigger in 2007 that incorporates the exact same safety feature that the original designer proposed in '48?

    As an aside, I also learned from this documentary that Remington Arms was purchased in 2007 by an investment firm that went around quietly buying up gun companies. Today, Remington is part on an umbrella corporation that also includes Bushmaster, Marlin, H&R, and DPMS/Panther Arms.
    The Marine Corps uses very little of the Remington 700 besides the Receiver body nowadays in the M40.The m40 A1-5 has basicaly evolved into an entirely custom rifle compared to the M40 that was fielded in Vietnam.the Marine Corps has eliminated many problems of the Remington system

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Northern Mississippi
    Posts
    1,756

    Default

    I have had customers bring rifles in that were doing exactly that, FTF, then boom when they touch the bolt. What usually has happened is that the triger bar (forgive a possible nomenclature goof here, I don't know Rem's names for ALL of those little parts) has almost released the sear, but is still touching it by a few thousandths. The jarring (even tho it is slight) of turning the bolt or even touching the handle, causes the sear to be released by the bar. It's an adjustment issue, 99% of the time. We often adjusted them before the customer even left with the new rifle, just because of this issue. Often times, an ounce of prevention cures a ton of oh shit! Know what I mean?

    As a former Military EM, Off, and LEO, who is a graduate of the Army's Armorer Course, I realize the issues with those having "give-a-shit" attitudes, and you see that in all areas, just less in the military. Often LE agency amorors are not trained anywhere but self-training thru experience. Nothing wrong with that, if you have a good base and are willing to read some instruction manuals. Today's (and the past 3-4 decades of) training budgets are centered around legalty issues and defeating possibilities for law suits. Armorers are usually the guys who "know a bit" and can get the job done, as far as basic needs.

    Our "run them down ad sue them" society is not without it's drawbacks, fellas.
    Join the PSL Owners' Group. I'll approve you as soon as I see your request.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    1,920

    Default

    Its not a trigger adjustment issue. They go bang from the factory when safety is disingaged. I was lucky enough to get one of the malfunctioning 700's. I am very glad nobody was injured. It scared the shit out of me.
    Last edited by jdub; 10-28-2010 at 01:19 AM.

  32. #32

    Default

    Most likely CNBC is on a witch hunt for gun companies. That's what the liberal media does. Remington just got in the crosshairs because of aledged problems.

    Based on all of the facts to date, it looks like Remington has had a lot of problems with the 700 and failed to adress them because of corporate greed. Now, naturally they aren't going to fess up to anything.

    The real truth is probably somewhere between the CNBC and Remington stories.

    All I know is that in the past 15 years I have had 6 problems with Remington products. In each case their customer service responded OK and supplied replacement products. The very last time I refused a replacement and demanded my money back, which I got, but only after a lot of hassle.

    I don't need hassle. I don't need to have to do things over. I resolved about 5 years ago that I would never again use a product labeled Remington, even if I got it for free. I worked for a company that knowingly shipped crap, but then bent over backwards to replace it to those that caught them in the act. I believe that was Remington's philosopy as well.

    I don't know what the truth is about the 700, but you would never have found me shooting one even before the CNBC story. But now, I'll go one step further - nobody alowed to come on my property with one either!

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I have had two 700bdl ,s that fired when the bolt was closed,one was a 243 itonly did it once while I had it. The other was a 3006 it was very dangerous . they were both stolen befor Icould have them fixed. Remington at one time had directions on how to adjust the trigger. they nolonger incloud this.

  34. #34

    Default

    Not that I am jumping on the Anti -Remington bandwagon as I own zero 700's ,BUT ,a gunsmith friend of mine replaces about 20 Remington 700 extractors a year in his shop( 40 being the highest as he actually keeps score) I have fired probably 100's of thousands of rounds downrange in the Marine Corps and as a civilian with M-14's ,M-16's,Various automatic weapons, Mausers,Mosins and SAKOS and have never had an extractor fail or break.Imagine that

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Cottonwood, AZ
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Crusher View Post
    If someone has either a .308 or 30-06 I'll buy the death trap cheap !!! LOL Midway is 10 minutes from the house and they have all kinds of replacement triggers.
    Exactly!! If the stock trigger makes someone nervous, there are a host of aftermarket triggers that will do the job at least as well, usually better. They usually bolt right on and are adjustable, something Remington shies away from.
    Mike

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Northern Mississippi
    Posts
    1,756

    Default

    The major concern is that one should not have to do ANYthing to a weapon to have it be relatively safe. Stock, from the factory, it should be safe. That's the whole point of the discussion.
    Last edited by TW1Kell; 10-28-2010 at 12:56 AM. Reason: typo
    Join the PSL Owners' Group. I'll approve you as soon as I see your request.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jdub View Post
    Its not a trigger adjustment issue. They go bang from the factory when safety is disingaged. I was lucky enough to get one of the malfunctioning 700's. I am very glad nobody was injured. It scared the shit out of me.
    Same here. I returned to my vehicle after a day hunting and went to unload my Remington 700 BDL and when I pushed the safety it fired. My first thought was "it shouldn't do that". Gave me quite a start. That was in 1986 and hasn't happened since. But it does happen as many can attest. Still a damn good rifle except it has a defect that must be watched. No way around it as the safety must be disengaged to open the bolt to unload. I still use it but am well aware that it can and probably will discharge when the safety is disengaged. And yes, I had it new from the factory since the early 1970s and never adjusted the trigger.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    504

    Default

    Portland, Maine tactical squad is getting rid of their model 700's. They have documented the accidental discharge on video on a supposedly "untweaked" rifle.

    http://www.pressherald.com/news/crai...010-10-28.html
    Where am I going, and how did I get into this hand basket??

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Blade View Post
    Same here. I returned to my vehicle after a day hunting and went to unload my Remington 700 BDL and when I pushed the safety it fired. My first thought was "it shouldn't do that". Gave me quite a start. That was in 1986 and hasn't happened since. But it does happen as many can attest. Still a damn good rifle except it has a defect that must be watched. No way around it as the safety must be disengaged to open the bolt to unload. I still use it but am well aware that it can and probably will discharge when the safety is disengaged. And yes, I had it new from the factory since the early 1970s and never adjusted the trigger.
    Remington first modified the mod. 700 in the early 80's so that the rifle didn't need to be taken off of 'safe' to unload. I believe this is an indication that they knew there was a problem.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    746

    Default

    you will never agree with each other but remington has a responce www.remington700.tv . with the almost 500+ triggers i had to deal with some are ppl moveing the trigger set screws for a lighter trigger. with about 85% mostly due to poor maintance. ppl do NOT know how to clean there gun. WD40 is not a cleaner it Gel's up. Hoppies gels up its a BORE cleaner not a trigger cleaner. rust, pine needles, dirt, and 300 lbs of anti seez. if this blocks the sear from comming up due to be stuck from poor maintance it will fire. there is a bolt lock program. the rifle in question was the rifle that started this program in the 70's. not being able to open the bolt with the safety on was the only fix they did to the triggers. now you can have the safe on and open and empty your rifle. this program also confuses many ppl, the x-mark pro trigger has nothing to do with this law suite its a bit of a different design. that the facts take what you will from it.

    later
    vaughn

  41. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    114

    Default

    I have a 700BDL that I bought new around 1980 or so. It has always functioned just fine. One exception. I pulled the rifle out of the safe two months ago to shoot after sitting for 15 years or so. The trigger would not release. When I took the rifle out of the stock, I found out that the oil had gone sticky and would not allow the trigger to function. Breakfree and a little manipulation cured the problem. As long as bubba is let near a gun with a tool, problems such as these discharges are bound to happen. Too many people think cops or the military are supreme experts with guns, well, they are WRONG. I was a cop and am a veteran and I know different.....chris3

  42. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Kentucky, When I'm Home
    Posts
    588

    Default

    I've owned a few myself over the years but have never any issues. As to military 700s, I repair them daily (about 6+ come in a day). The only issues besides getting the snot beat out of them due to combat ops is adjustments not IAW operator manuals, heavy wear and tear and large amounts of dirt-dust-sand etc etc. I've been following this story but have yet to see it myself. The CNBC news story is interesting and so is Remington's response.
    Last edited by SARETRob; 12-09-2010 at 06:47 PM.
    To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. - Theodore Roosevelt

  43. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    LEOs and military may not be the ultimate experts but, are they liars? The claim is the malfunctioning rifles were unmodified.

  44. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    South Georgia
    Posts
    225

    Default

    I bought a used 700 several years ago in .06. The price was a real steal or so I thought. Slapped a scope on it and was off to the range the same day. My father riding with me and holding my new prize. He began working the action and the safety. We quickly discovered someone had tried to adjust the trigger and had messed up. With the gun cocked if you moved the safety to the fire positon it dry fired. The more he tried it the more frequently it dry fired by moving the safety into the fire position. Turned around went home removed the trigger. It was beyond what I could do to correct it and not lose my patience. Sent the trigger off to a good smith and I was in busy in several weeks. Never did it again. Mo
    As iron sharpens iron so does one man sharpen another.

  45. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,741

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Looter View Post
    I don't think it's unreasonable to expect a firearm to not fire when you take the safety off, or touch the bolt handle. This is the first I've heard of any potential safety issue with the 700s. I don't own one, that's why I ask.

    The USMC sniper school has confirmed they've had multiple incidents where their militarized 700s discharged unexpectedly on the firing line.

    If this is what's happening, to me it's worth discussing.
    I have a Mauser K98k that did the same thing. A rifle can go off; when a worn safety is flipped into the off position. It was easy to fix with a new safety for about $5 on EBAY. Gotta couple of spares in my parts box...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •