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  1. #1

    Default Antique Double Barrels-Please Help ID! Walker & Meriden

    I've recently obtained these from a friend and am not exactly sure what I have. The first is a percussion double barrel shotgun with exposed hammers. It is marked "Walker" on both sides of the lock plates and has a barrel length of 40.5" and an overall length of 56.5"! It is a long firearm. A small trap door is located on the underside of the stock and the metal exhibits a floral-esque type engraving throughout. The second shotgun is a double barrel sidelock shotgun manufactured by Meriden Firearms Co and is designated "The A.J. Aubrey" The sidelocks exhibit scroll engraving with some pinpoint stippling. The barrels are damascus (laminated steel) and a length of 30.75" The stock has a brass stud for attaching a sling, and there is also another brass stud soldered to the barrel for the same purpose, in similar fashion to the sling attachment points found on a martial Henry rifle. Please help me find any other info on these guns and their potential value.
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  2. #2

    Default Meriden

    And here are the photos of the Meriden.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    dallas,tx
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    222

    Default RE:Shotgun

    The Aubrey was made by sears and in their own factory.Read all about it in the 1903 catalog.They build an entirely new factory to make this gun, Aubrey was the manager of the factory. They were still only a mail order only sears gun so not worth much, sorry.Good luck with it.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks, any idea on the walker?

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default

    some people collect the Aubrey shotguns, values unless excellent are low.
    some i have seen recently are beautifully restore but still low values for the time put in.
    they were a finely made working mans guns, used up and put away wet, dirty most of the time.
    few are shot today for good reason.<><dk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default

    Couldn't find anything on a gunsmith named Walker or his shotguns. Sorry.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  7. #7
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    Question

    from a partal list of older makers. try William Walker great smokey mts. Tenn. noted gun- smith. born 1838 made muzzle loading cap lock rifles few shotguns.
    might not be the right guy?<><dk
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 11-22-2010 at 11:03 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NE Georgia Mountains
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    25

    Default

    The Walker appears to be European. Pull the barrels and check for proof marks on the underside. Many "American" shotguns were imported from Belgium, then stamped with a sellers name(Walker).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    461

    Default

    Your Aubrey is a step or 2 above the field (plain) grade.
    On the action flats should be the serial number along with the barrel steel code and barrel length usually.
    'D' = Damascus,,,'T' for twist/laminated steel. I don't recall what the code was for a plain steel barrel (maybe 'S'!)

    Should be followed by the barrel length in inches. Would read as D30 ,,,or D32,,etc.
    The earlier guns had catalog numbers assigned to the different grades,,but that code was not present on the gun. It's what you used in mail ordering it from Sears Roebuck. All that showed on the action flats were the serial number, barrel steel type code and the barrel lenght in inches.

    After about 1909/10 they began using a number code for each Grade. Two digit,,the higher the number,, the higher the grade. That # was stamped on the action flats along with the barrel material and length marking.
    Seems like the grade#'s went from the 20's up into the 60's ,,perhaps higher.
    Commonly stamped as the ser# & barrel info code on one flat,,the Grade stamping on the opposing flat.

    They made some high grade guns. Some of the workers were Parker employees doing double shifts. Some switched employment. The top engraver was Wm. Gough. He was a Parker engraver as well as doing work for Colt, Winchester, Fox and others.

    The company only lasted till 1918.

    The swivel bases on your gun are add-ons from a later date I'd guess. The guns don't bring an awful lot of money except for the very high grades and condition is everything of course. Ejectors (rather than plain extractors) will boost the price. The barrel length should be an even #. If the code is present on the frame flats it will immediately tell you what the gun left the factory with.

    Here's a Meriden/A.J.Aubrey that recently sold. Looks to be the same grade as yours. But the seller didn't mention a grade stamp,,just a 'T3C' on the action flats,,which I suspect is a poorly stamped 'T30'. Denotes Twist barrels of 30" length.
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=194730162

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antique41 View Post
    The Walker appears to be European.
    Now that you mention it, yes, the styling is continental European, the sling eyes go with a hook type european sling swivel, and the font used in "Walker" appears sort of Germanic. If it is imported it'll have proofs. If not maybe nothing or just a letter or mark as US commecial makers proofed their own firearms.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    North Florida Panhandle
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    Default

    Three known makers named "Walker" in Virginia late 1700's early 1800's. None of these are a possibility most probably. Three more "Walkers" of Southern provenance ie Alabama, Tennessee and Georgia, mid to late 1800's. It is highly, highly unlikely any of these had the technical capability to make SXS doubleguns. Even contemporary makers shy away from making these due to the difficulty. A very few SXS's were made in America in and around New York City in the early 1800's, all flintlocks to the best of my memory. The doubleguns such as this one were usually made in Europe with the English and Germans making the "high-end" pieces, and the ones made for the working class American market usually coming from Belgium. The locks on this piece are back action types, and this will date this piece to the 1840-1880 period most probably. Also.....the name "Walker" stamped on each lock most probably denotes that these locks were made by "Walker", and not the piece itsself! Possibly English? Maybe. I would investigate this possibility. The photos show that it isn't a "high-end" piece IMO.

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