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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Ohio
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    76

    Default Herters Super Model 3 info anyone?

    Hiya-

    I just got a Herters Super Model 3 reloading press. I have tried to find info on it, but have been unable to.

    if anyone has any info on this press, PLEASE let me know. This thing is too cool to let sit.

    Pete

  2. #2

    Default

    They are actually pretty simple devices but I remember a bit about them; what do you want to know?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Ohio
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    Default

    Boomtoob...anything you can tell me about them would be wonderful. Can it work with regular dies? Do I need an adapter kit? Would I be better off selling it & buying a newer press? When were they made? is there a manual for it floating around somewhere?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    michigan
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    926

    Default

    The ones I have seen used needed an adaptor to use regular dies. The adaptors are listed occasionally in gun magazines.
    You won't break the thing, but you may not be able to lift it onto the bench.
    Good luck!

  5. #5

    Default

    Herter's was the sportsman's equivelent of Sear's; they didn't make anything but had stuff made or packaged with the Herters logo on it. And, like Sears, they had lots of good stuff and some not so good stuff but all of it gave more than good service for the price. Your press was likely made during their sells peak of the 60s.

    The loading tools were mostly well made by small machine and foundry shops such as Well's and Rhur-American, who also marketed some identical stuff in the same period and was sold under their own labels. The press is said to have been cast "semi-steel" which makes it tuffer than cheaper/weaker cast iron. Anything can be broken I suppose but they were as near fool-proof as a press could get!

    Herter's got hit by some over extended business ventures and then the "1968 Omnibus Crime Bill/Gun Control Act" that stopped mail order gun sales to honest citizens and had us documenting ALL ammo sales, even .22 RF and shotshells, for a long time. The GCA put a LOT of smallish gun dealers under by the early 70s (but, as would be expected, didn't do a damp thing about "crime"). All that's left of Herter's now is the marketing value of the memory of the brand.

    For use, what you have is just a press. Most of what you need to know is clear and I don't remember that they even had an owner's book when new. If you're a noob, instructions for the use of a press and dies can be found in most loading manuals; Lee, Hornady and Lyman all have good info and any rational reloader MUST have a manual anyway.

    Herter's presses do take normal (7/8" x 14) dies. A few used modern type shell holders but most of them did not. Original Herter's "screw in" shell holders are hard to find but they show up on eBay from time to time. If yours needs the originals, both RCBS and CH4D (Google 'em) sell adapters so you can use current shell holders and that's a good solution. The adapters cost about $15 last time I looked.

    If you don't have the original priming arm and punches it would be wise to just get a handheld Lee AutoPrime and do that work off the press.

    You need not wonder if you would benefit from a newer press but it's a single toggle lever design so it requires a good bit more lever pressure to FL size than current compound toggles require. But that really doesn't matter much other than it puts a bit more stress on the bench so that needs good strength.

    Clean it occasionally. Put a few drops of light oil on the ram and toggle hinges once a year and it will last forever.

    Have fun.
    Last edited by boomtube; 12-02-2010 at 11:36 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
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    Default

    Thanks Boomtube...I truly appreciate all the help.

    Pete

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    central Ks
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    Default

    According to another furum, Midway USA and CH4D sells an adapter to allow a threaded Herters to use a standard "modern" shellholder.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    central Ks
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    The reloading press described as the model 3 super tool reloader that is marketed by Herter’s inc. of Waseca, Minn includes oscillatable and reciprocal components that are similar to those found I the reloading press of the current invention. The reciprocal components of the Herters reloading machine include rectilinearly reciprocal shell holders and you have the oscillatable components that include oscillatable actuating handles and the primer arms.

    W.T.F.?????????????????????????????????????????


    Some engineer who adores big words too much??????


    Here, ya'all can look at it.
    http://www.buyreloadingpress.com/c-h...g-presses.html


    Another important object of this new invention is to provide an attachment for the existing conventional reloading presses which could be readily attached and utilized to help convert conventional reloading presses for its function in accordance with the present invention.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    8,262

    Default

    RCBS sells adapter that allows use of regular shell holders in the Herters presses. I dragged my feet on this item for decades and finally bought it for 18 bucks: well ..... best 18 bucks spent in a long time. Do yourself a favor, get one.

    As to Herters presses which are unique, long gone off the market and generally over built and very rugged. I got the biG O model which is huge. Bought it as a kid thinking Herters had the entire line of reloading gear and that was the way to go. Found their swaging gear was not good and dies were horrible but the press was strong and sturdy and great to use. Leverage is fine with pistol reloading but a bear with rifle and a purchase of Rock Chucker cured me of ever wrestling with rifle reloading on the Herters press. So there it sits on my bench: okay for single stage pistol and a PITA for rifle reloading. Massive and since my father used it for decades , its emotionally going to be there on my bench for that reason. I mainly use it for decapping . The leverage is certainly less than a Rock Chucker and the main fault in this press.

    Herters shell holders: PITA to find, to keep tight on the ram and JUST BUY THE RCBS ADAPTOR AND FORGET THE HASSEL.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    West River South Dakota
    Posts
    373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    W.T.F.?????????????????????????????????????????


    Some engineer who adores big words too much??????


    Here, ya'all can look at it.
    http://www.buyreloadingpress.com/c-h...g-presses.html
    That is kind of confusing. For clarity they should have added this information about reciprocating and oscillation:

    "Reciprocating oscillation is an action of oscillation where the oscillation vector varies its amplitude, frequency and or displacement reciprocally. (Note: not to be confused with the reciprocal of the given sinusoidal function). For example, an oscillation that changes its amplitude and thereby, for example, its displacement every cycle to half that of its initial amplitude is said to be reciprocating. Note that the term reciprocating can be used loosely to describe such an action but usually is not because such an action can be defined easily as two separate oscilations. Instead it is more commonly used to describe an oscillation in which the second definable oscillation can be defined as a non-rotary cycle as its displacement.

    Reciprocating oscillation is an action where an oscillating body reciprocates within the oscillation, where reciprocation is distinct from just another oscillation by only "jumping up and down" and not oscillating about an axis."

    Hope that helps.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reciprocating_oscillation

    BTW I worked as a registered professional engineer for about 25 years and I can not make very much out of the above bafflegab. I don't think either one was written by an engineer.
    Last edited by F84FMechanic; 12-05-2010 at 05:54 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Years ago I tried the Ruhr American dies in a 243. Every case stuck no matter what lube was used. Found out the sizing die
    had no taper, just a straight hole ??.
    Muc of Herters stuff was crap.
    Good Luck!

  12. #12
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    Jan 2010
    Location
    central Ks
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    Default

    You're alright F84FMechanic, no matter what Hawkins says about ya. LMAO!!!!!!!


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bean Town in the worthless nut state.
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    Default

    The only problem I have had resizing rifle cases was with some old military cases that I have had for about 40 years. I had to go in stages to resize them. If you have a good sturdy bench and mount the press so you can operate it standing it isn't to bad. I have two #3 presses and wouldn't trade them for anything. The main thing is I neck size all cases that have been fired in each rifle.

    Rad
    NRA Benefactor Member

    AMA Life Member

    Life Member Tri State Gun Collectors

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default

    I forgot to say one thing. The Herters O press refuses to deprime a case and send that spent primer in the same direction/ velocity / angle with any repetition. It masters the art of making every primer arc onto your floor. In over 40 yrs, only two primers ever went down the cut out and into the spent primer catcher. Its almost like there is some spirit living there that wants no primer to ever be anywhere but onto the floor. Unbelieveable.

    I have spent hours trying to defeat this with NO success. I put a 5 gal. pail under the press and catch most of the primers...sort of and maybe.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    169

    Default

    I put a 5 gal. pail under the press and catch most of the primers...sort of and maybe.

    Laughing my a$$ off. My Herters O...I made a "primer catcher" out of the bottom of a 2 liter plastic pop bottle. Notched and attached it in the best position with rubber bands...still miss catching around 20% of them there primers...but I still love that press.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    8,262

    Default

    The Herters 0 Press: who in blazes made these ? They are definitely not some light weight Asian import !

    I know who designed the primer ejection .... THE NORTH KOREANS

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    West River South Dakota
    Posts
    373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by milprileb View Post
    The Herters 0 Press: who in blazes made these ? They are definitely not some light weight Asian import !.....
    I am surprised you did not know since they were "World Famous". But then everything in Herter's catlalogs and advertisements was "World Famous".

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    8,262

    Default

    Okay , Indeed they were World Famous but remember that they were also MODEL PERFECT.

    but Kim Il Sung did invent the primer ejection !!!

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