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Thread: Bulldog .44 and a Webley

  1. #1

    Post Bulldog .44 and a Webley

    Just bought a Forehand & Wadsworth .44 cal. "British Bulldog" ( yes I know they are U.S. made. Just marked and marketed as a "British Bulldog ) Don't have it in my hand yet. The seller has another in .32 cal for sale :

    http://sassnet.com/forums/index.php?...&#entry2104724

    Also a Webley that belongs to a friend. The lanyard ring had been ground off and I'm going to replace that for him. Is this a MK V ? I'm not very familiar with models other than the MK VIs of which I have a couple. The file handle in the small picture points to where someone has ground of the . . . . ( don't know just what it would be called ) off.

    See them at : www.drburkholter.com/cf18.html

  2. Default

    That's a MK IV. Replacing the hinge screw would be more important than the lanyard ring. The 44 F&W bulldogs are the rarest of the 3 models. The parts are a little soft, so don't shoot it too much.

  3. #3

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    I have no idea why the hinge screw would have been ground off. Very smoothly done.

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    I wonder if it didn't get wedged by being put in to the wrong side.

  5. #5

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    Are you Forehand and Wadsworth centre fire, I have one in .41 and another in .32 but both of mine are rime fire.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    124

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    Forehand & Wadsworth made single action spur trigger models in rimfire calibers. Their British Bulldog model was double action and center fire.

  7. #7

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    Mine are double action rimfire according to their literature they made both.
    Jim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    124

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1MXJIM View Post
    Mine are double action rimfire according to their literature they made both.
    Jim
    You are correct: F&W also made a double action rimfire revolver in 1870s in .32, .38, and .41 calibers. It preceded their British Bulldog model, and was a smaller design, with a removable ejector rod stored in the center pin which was often lost. Thay are usually marked with June 1871 and October 1873 patent dates.

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