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Thread: Gew 88/05 - Original German Barrel - Turk Bolt Head

  1. #1
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    Default Gew 88/05 - Original German Barrel - Turk Bolt Head

    OK, someone help me out here. I came into a Gew 88/05 (Loewe 1890, it is not a 88/14) today, and really have no idea what the value of it is. I did some digging here on the forum, and did some disassembly to get to the bottom of this rifle (sorry no pics right now). It is a complete mismatch, has the 'S' and the stripper guides riveted in place. The bolt cocking knob has the 'S'. I removed the barrel shroud and the markings are all seemingly the original German markings. The bore is mirror, like it was never used. The barrel under the shroud had no serial number (is it supposed to?). Well, there was a number (56) but can 56 really be a serial? There were roman numbers on the barrel, I. II. or something, and the eagle crown proofs and some fancy letters like you see on the right side of the receiver.

    So what exactly do I have here, other than an 88/05 that doesn't look like it went to Turkey? What's the value of something like this?

    Update: Overlooked a piece, found a crescent on the bolt head. Only part that has a Turk marking.
    Last edited by mosinbuckeye; 02-12-2011 at 07:21 PM. Reason: Found Turkish marking

  2. #2
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    Pics would reduce the guess work. Does the serial number on the action end with #56?

    A whole lot of Turkish use Gew 88/05's are in great shape. Not all have Turkish added serial numbers or Creasants added to the receiver. I would have to say that the odds are it was imported from Turkey. Photos will help you identify the rifle. Nothing wrong with Turkish 88/05 rifles.

  3. #3
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    Are the last two numbers in the receiver serial number 56? If so, it might not be a Turk barrel, but the original. Nothing wrong with Turk barrels, either, and I believe they are more likely to be for .323 bullets than the originals, if I recall other posts here.

  4. #4
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    Sorry about the lack of photos, didn't have a camera available at the time. Here are some now, depicting the barrel with the shroud removed. I don't have the means at the moment to slug the barrel, so maybe someone can fill me in off this as to what exactly I may need to do before shooting this. I have a mic, which I could use to gauge the muzzle, but that is undoubtedly not going to be accurate compared to slugging.

    The 56 on the barrel does not match the receiver serial. Any thoughts on value? I understand the Turk Gew88's to be fairly common, this one has not a single matching part to it either (I think the barrel shroud was force matched, or at least it was overstamped to match)

    More pictures can be taken upon request, but I really don't want to take apart the thing again, it is soaked in cosmoline.



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  5. #5
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    That has a Prussian Eagle acceptance stamp on it, so the barrel is German. The last two numbers on the action do not match "56", so it is a replacement barrel, after German use. It appears to be blued? German barrels were in the "white", if it is blued I would imagine it happened in Turkey. Is there anything else stamped on the barrel? Is there a taper in the barrel?

    The bolt head is a Czech made one made for Turkey.

    Hard to predict value on these. Like anything else, condition, matching serial numbers have a lot to do with that. I have seen them go from between $100 - $300.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyliecoyote View Post
    That has a Prussian Eagle acceptance stamp on it, so the barrel is German. The last two numbers on the action do not match "56", so it is a replacement barrel, after German use. It appears to be blued? German barrels were in the "white", if it is blued I would imagine it happened in Turkey. Is there anything else stamped on the barrel? Is there a taper in the barrel?

    The bolt head is a Czech made one made for Turkey.

    Hard to predict value on these. Like anything else, condition, matching serial numbers have a lot to do with that. I have seen them go from between $100 - $300.
    Thanks for the additional info. The barrel is blued, and I didn't notice a taper in the barrel, but it could have been slight if there was one. I think I forgot to take a picture of one set of markings on the barrel that I referred to before as looking like Roman numerals, I'll try to get it apart again and snap that.

    The only two parts that match are the receiver and barrel shroud, even though the barrel shroud seems to have had the numbers stamped over another set of numbers, the font of the numbers match the font on the receiver.

  7. #7
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    More photos of the barrel and other markings that I thought looked interesting. The barrel is most definitely tapered. Almost reminds me of the taper you would find on a standard hunting rifle.

    W K & Co marking on the magazine. Any thoughts on who they are?
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    Interesting mark on the stock just behind the trigger guard.
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    Bottom of the receiver with a 'Z' stamped on it.
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    Notice the force matched barrel shroud.
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    Gew88 is left alone on the receiver, no additional markings added.
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    And the markings I described as roman numerals are what looks like L M W with a subscript L.
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    Here are the markings on the buttplate.
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    Additional marking on the barrel, 'SGS'
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    If those knowledgeable can point out what some of these markings mean, I'd appreciate it. If they are unknown, that's to be expected for something this old!
    Looking For:
    1925-27 Tikka M91
    1892-95 Châtellerault M91

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mosinbuckeye View Post
    W K & Co marking on the magazine. Any thoughts on who they are?
    may be a "private" part's maker?
    Bottom of the receiver with a 'Z' stamped on it.
    in my oppinon, this is a workersmarking
    Notice the force matched barrel shroud.
    seen often at turk rifles
    Gew88 is left alone on the receiver, no additional markings added.
    not uncommon, too
    And the markings I described as roman numerals are what looks like L M W with a subscript L.
    must be n. m. and Wi means neues Material (new Steel material for the barrel) and Witten, who made the steelfor the barrel
    Here are the markings on the buttplate.
    the 1 and the W indicates, that the rifle was reworked by the Germans during the Great War
    Additional marking on the barrel, 'SGS'
    i don't know, too

    Grüße

    Peter

  9. #9
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    I just picked up a couple boxes of .318 diameter 200 grain jacketed soft points and am going to reload some for this old war horse. Before I take it to the range though, I need some advice on a stock fix, if it's necessary. The last time I disassembled my Gew 88/05 I noticed the stock was split between the magazine opening and the trigger opening (for those with a Norwegian k98 stock with the dowel repair in the bolt head recess, this is the type of split that dowel would fix). I don't see how it would shatter the stock to shoot it as is, but I'd rather not risk it if that's a possibility. Other than doing a dowel repair myself, what would you all suggest? Keep in mind I'm not going to be taking this to war, or shooting it a lot. I thought of some adhesive, but not sure what would hold up to recoil. Should I just leave it alone?

  10. #10
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    W&K Weyersberg & Kirschbaum, Solingen, Knwon as an export Mauser-Bayonet Makers,( Chile etc) also made Ersatz German bayonets in WW I, and subsidiary Gun parts for the German Ordnance Service.

    Can't add anything more; Most probably a 1920s partial refurb ( Czech Bolt parts, Reblue ( to cover all the "White" parts, Turkish script rear signt, but may have reverted to "S" ( Western) graduations in 1930s Refurb of sights for use with 154grain ball.

    Photos of all the details would help a lot.

    Doc AV
    AV Ballistics.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mosinbuckeye View Post
    I just picked up a couple boxes of .318 diameter 200 grain jacketed soft points and am going to reload some for this old war horse. Before I take it to the range though, I need some advice on a stock fix, if it's necessary. The last time I disassembled my Gew 88/05 I noticed the stock was split between the magazine opening and the trigger opening (for those with a Norwegian k98 stock with the dowel repair in the bolt head recess, this is the type of split that dowel would fix). I don't see how it would shatter the stock to shoot it as is, but I'd rather not risk it if that's a possibility. Other than doing a dowel repair myself, what would you all suggest? Keep in mind I'm not going to be taking this to war, or shooting it a lot. I thought of some adhesive, but not sure what would hold up to recoil. Should I just leave it alone?

    Uploaded a photo of a "bullet test" with a .318 bullet that I double checked with a micrometer (came out to about .3175). It appears to be what I need and I wasn't planning on shooting any 8mm surplus anyway (.323 stuff). It is an original German barrel (though not the original barrel), and I haven't seen any commercial US 8mm in quite some time, which I understand should be .320-.321. Anyway, the sticky above regarding the bore diameters and such confused the heck out of me. If these .318 bullets shoot all over the place, oh well, at least there is less likelihood of overpressure from under sized bullets. There is a "Z" on the receiver, but underneath (see photo above) and not visible above the wood. Not even sure what this means.

    Anyone have any suggestions on what to do with the stock (see quote)?

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    Last edited by mosinbuckeye; 04-25-2011 at 07:44 PM.

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