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  1. #1
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    Dec 2009
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    Default Steel jacketed bullets

    So I bought a few boxes of Wolf ammo - mostly to test how bad it can be in my Savage 10FP and LRPV.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=916964

    I am now having second thoughts. It has a bi-metal jacket, so steel layers alternate with copper layers. Now, steel bullet jacket cannot be good on a barrel, can it?

    For example, here.

    So is shooting it worth the risk, or should I save it for the time when I maybe will have a crappier rifle?

  2. #2
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    From what I saw online, the copper layer protects the barrel, and the steel layer keeps the cost of the round down, since steel is less expensive than copper.
    "Conceal Carry. Because when seconds count, the police are only minutes away."

  3. #3
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    NORMA and other Premium European makers have used this plated steel jacket in their hunting ammo in the past with no bore problems. Winchester/US Govt testing on bullet jackets and bore wear showed no difference between plated MILD Steel jackets and traditional gilding metal jacketed projectiles. The bimetal jackets are used in many USA and most foreign modern small arms ammuntion.

    It's the Propellant and the 50,000psi BLOW TORCH flame that cuts/wears the throat out of a barrel long before any effect of the bullet running down the bore makes a difference.
    "Saigon Tea, 60 P, you no buy you di di DI!"

  4. #4
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    true, us government and frankfort arsnal just did another study to see which bullet had most detremental damage on the bore, throat, and ect. FINDINGS!!!!..........................steel was the most destructive. why? it destroyed steel targets more often due to impact. not the bore, just targets.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by solyanik View Post
    So I bought a few boxes of Wolf ammo - mostly to test how bad it can be in my Savage 10FP and LRPV.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=916964

    I am now having second thoughts. It has a bi-metal jacket, so steel layers alternate with copper layers. Now, steel bullet jacket cannot be good on a barrel, can it?

    For example, here.

    So is shooting it worth the risk, or should I save it for the time when I maybe will have a crappier rifle?
    I don't shoot Wolf (the Russian stuff) because the powder leaves so much fouling.
    No one to my knowledge sells bare steel bullets these days. Steel on steel has too much friction. That is why the steel bullets are plated; dissimilar metals have less friction, and the plating retards rust. Now, to be determined is if the plating stays on the bullet as it passes through the bore. If it wears off, leaving bare steel to steel contact before exiting, then I would expect a muzzle velocity issue.

  6. #6
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    Bullet jackets using steel are usually clad, not plated. So, there's not much chance of the rifleing cutting away the gilding metal layer. And even if it did, the steel layer is soft and would not wear the bore anywhere near as much as the hot gasses. As ammolab said, bores are not worn out by friction.

    Clad bullets, known as GMCS (Gilding Metal Clad Steel), were used extensively beginning in WW II when copper became a vital metal.

    oldfairfaxsub, Frankford Arsenal closed in 1977 so any recent studies would have involved someone else.

    Ray

  7. #7
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    oh my bad, i was on polygunbag.com and they had the bullets for sale left over from the study. i assumed they got them from the arsnal recently. they generally have a high turn over on stock

  8. #8
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    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Meketa View Post
    Bullet jackets using steel are usually clad, not plated. So, there's not much chance of the rifleing cutting away the gilding metal layer. And even if it did, the steel layer is soft and would not wear the bore anywhere near as much as the hot gasses. As ammolab said, bores are not worn out by friction.

    Clad bullets, known as GMCS (Gilding Metal Clad Steel), were used extensively beginning in WW II when copper became a vital metal.

    oldfairfaxsub, Frankford Arsenal closed in 1977 so any recent studies would have involved someone else.

    Ray
    The greater effect of steel on steel friction would be a reduction in muzzle velocity and energy. Barrel steel is relatively hard; bullet jacket steel is relatively soft to deform to the rifling. From a metallurgical standpoint, a steel bullet jacket can be engineered to deform more uniformly and evenly to seal better than copper or gilding metal.

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