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  1. #1
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    Default The best .45ACP 1911?

    Ok, so currently too young to get a pistol permit but it's basically decided that when I do I'm getting a colt 1911 in .45 ACP
    Now I've heard a few different things about brands and I was hoping for some feedback.
    I've heard mixed reviews about springfields, but mostly good.
    I've heard from one source I trust Colt's have gone to crap (which makes little sense since they originally made the damn things), and other sources I trust equally have told me Colt's are good.
    I've heard mostly good things about Kimber, Auto Ordanance, and Smith&Wesson as well.
    Wilson Combat& Les Baer are out of my price range, though i do understand you get what you pay for in the gun industry(usually).
    So some advice, horror stories and such would be much appreciated, thanks.
    I will not fear the terror of the night,
    nor the arrow that flies by day-Psalm 91:5

  2. #2
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    Every single one you have mentioned makes a fine 1911. Yes, some people will swear Colt has slipped, but I know guys who swear by them, and I have had more than a few without a single stinker in the bunch. There are always lemons in any brand which will slip through QC, and those you will hear about more than any good ones. But for the most part, those mentioned will all make you a fine pistol. There are higher and lower models in each brand, but for the most part, unless you are a very experienced shooter many of the differences will not be a big thing. So a good standard model from any one of those will make you a good place to start out. It wont be your last 1911, or last pistol.

    As Justin Wilson used to say " I garoontee"...

  3. #3
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    What do you want it for ???
    Is it to be a target gun, competition gun, carry gun? Much depends on purpose.
    If new to 1911, you may want to start off with a mid-price standard 5" version and learn how to use it.
    Springfield: I picked up a very slightly used one for a good price just as a "beater" pistol for classes and training. As is, out of the box, it has a trigger sweeter than many very expensive custom comp guns. It has been put up side by side with many high priced guns and was an equal match. People just marvel at the feel of it. I did put adjustable rear sights on it at POI was not exactly to our liking with stock fixed sights. The .22 conversion kit works fine on it. It has been beat and abused as well as considerably used. Son won't part with it for any amount of money.
    Taurus PT-1911 : You get a lot for the money. I have no complaints with it.
    Kimber: never impressed me for the price tag
    Colt Gold Cup: I preferred the Springfield

    For my carry gun: I'm totally in love with my 3" Para Ordnance Warthog! I shoot better groups with it than with the 5" guns. The fat grip, with the double stack 10rd magazine, just fits my hand perfectly. The short sight radius makes it point very naturally. Even novice shooters have taken to it right away and really liked it. My wife, who had not shot in 30 years, did very well with it first time out and actually likes it a lot. For a compact 10+1 rd carry gun, I find no equal. It conceals well in one of several holsters I have for it and is a regular companion I don't mind wearing. In a 3" compact, I didn't take to the Kimber or the Colt but snapped up the Warthog the minute I had it in my hand. Intend to get another one for my son as he loves it too!

  4. #4
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    Welcome to the forum.

    Any manufacture has quality control issues from time to time. I haven't heard of any 1911 maker who's quality was always bad.

    With a 1911 platform, if you encounter a problem most of the time you can correct it on your own with hand tools and/or a dremel tool.

    I've had no problems with Springfield's 1911's or the Argentine Systema 1927 type of 1911's.

    Sometimes you pay more due to the brand name than what it's worth, so consider that.

    Just some observatons of mine, your experiance may vary.
    me26245

  5. #5
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    Default

    Norinco's have a good rep also.

    There are a couple of threads here on the Hi-points also. Looks like they are an inexpesive reliable alternative although they are pretty fugly IMO.

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...0-Hi-Point-.45

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...-High-Point-45
    Laugh hard and often.

    Gary

  6. #6
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    Hi-Points are not 1911 pistols. they are .45 acp pistols but not on the 1911 Browning design. The young man is asking specifically about 1911 designed pistols.

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    In bang for the buck, you may also want to consider the Rock Island Arsenal 1911 (Armscor, Phillipine manufacture). They seem to have a fair number of happy owners. I have an RIA Tactical and it seems a good buy for the price.

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    I have a Springfield Government Mil-Spec and love it.
    Springfield has exceptional customer service should you need it...

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the feedback guys, and for the record I'm mostly looking for a carry/"I'm not using no damn M9 in afghanistan" pistol.
    I will not fear the terror of the night,
    nor the arrow that flies by day-Psalm 91:5

  10. #10
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    Whatever you get, shoot it, break it in, and make sure you are comfortable and confident with it well before you get to a place where customer service is half a world away. I love my Springfield Mil-spec, but had to have some minor work done to the trigger to get it near to the poundage it was advertised to have out of the box. Good luck.
    Bob
    Where am I going, and how did I get into this hand basket??

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostcause39 View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback guys, and for the record I'm mostly looking for a carry/"I'm not using no damn M9 in afghanistan" pistol.
    More than likely, if you "jine the cavalree" and go to Ashcanistan, you will indeed be packing an M9 if you have a handgun. Uncle does not want you taking your own gun to the war (heck, when i went to SEA beter than 40 years ago, my orders said "No privately owned firearms", though plenty of people had their own and little or nothing was said about it), and from what severa who have gone (including a nephew in the TX ARNG), that is seriosuly enfoirced, as is the "Very limited souvenier arms and nothing modern" policy. That said, for a first 1911-clone, looks to me like the Armscor (RIA) guns are probably the best value for the money. Learn on that, and go for something a bit fancier later on if you want - or spend a bit on a trigger job, match-spec barrel and better sights for the Rock island.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    More than likely, if you "jine the cavalree" and go to Ashcanistan, you will indeed be packing an M9 if you have a handgun. Uncle does not want you taking your own gun to the war (heck, when i went to SEA beter than 40 years ago, my orders said "No privately owned firearms", though plenty of people had their own and little or nothing was said about it), and from what severa who have gone (including a nephew in the TX ARNG), that is seriosuly enfoirced, as is the "Very limited souvenier arms and nothing modern" policy. That said, for a first 1911-clone, looks to me like the Armscor (RIA) guns are probably the best value for the money. Learn on that, and go for something a bit fancier later on if you want - or spend a bit on a trigger job, match-spec barrel and better sights for the Rock island.
    Thanks for the heads up, didn't quite know the rules on that. Either way I'm not deploying till at least 2014 after i've gotten my comission and BOLC classes taken care of.
    I will not fear the terror of the night,
    nor the arrow that flies by day-Psalm 91:5

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxhush View Post
    In bang for the buck, you may also want to consider the Rock Island Arsenal 1911 (Armscor, Phillipine manufacture). They seem to have a fair number of happy owners. I have an RIA Tactical and it seems a good buy for the price.
    +1. My second 1911 is a RIA plain-Jane with GI sights. It has a splendid light, creep-free trigger out of the box; no tinkering needed at all.

    My first 1911 was a SIG GSR, and it had to go back for defects such as a firing pin that hit the primer on the edge, not center, and a conspicuous pit in the frame, next to the bullet ramp. It took SIG 4 months to get around to replacing it, and when it finally arrived, without any prior notification, I declined to accept it and traded it for something else. My experience with SIG's so-called customer service prompted me to dispose of a P220 Stainless Elite and get a Colt Series 70 Gold Cup.

    The only other 1911 I'd consider would be a S&W because S&W stands by their product. I also have a S&W 645 I bought more than 20 years ago. It was shooting way to the left, so I got a service authorization to have it looked at. The pistol came back exactly 3 weeks later, with a new bushing, and S&W charged me nothing.

  14. #14
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    how did you decline to accept it then trade it for something else?
    " Dude with a pencil is worse than a cat with a machinegun"... Bo Diddley

  15. #15
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    I have never heard of a bad Rock island. I like the taurus 1911s too.
    "A gun is a tool, Marian; no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that." -- Shane




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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by falm16 View Post
    how did you decline to accept it then trade it for something else?
    SIG sent a different pistol as a replacement, i.e. different serial number. I had to find a FFL to receive it and handle the transfer. A local gun/pawn shop I do regular business with agreed to handle the transfer for $20. So the pistol was sent there. I happened to drop in one day and one of the employees told me my pistol had arrived, (without SIG's bothering to notifiy me it was shipped.) So I let the store keep the pistol and and took a minty arsenal rebuilt Remington 03-A3 and a 72 HiPower in trade.

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    rock island....... as an entry pistol is the one for you.......all Colt and after market parts fit......AND ARE MORE ACCURATE RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX MORE THAN MOST SHOOTERS ARE!
    i have AND OR own them all except (auto ordnance, Les bare).......
    HAVE A MOD 70 GOLD CUP NATIONAL MATCH.... when new sent off to Wilson's 26 + YEARS GO.
    WILSON BARREL, bushing, springs, tuned up, checkered metal up grades......still looks almost normal till the bullet hits the bulls eye over and over again. it out shot its self like its now, when it was factory fresh.
    but the Rock island is twice the gun for the money as any gun on the market is dollar for dollar you get more... i'm not lying to you.....it the sales modle "Muscle Mustang" of the poor class of shooter.....on a "Escort salary."
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  18. #18
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    Got two Rock Island standard models a longone and a "commander" size. I also have an ancient Colt and a Taurus for targets. I have put over 500 rounds through the two RIAs and I cannot fault them at all. they are good dependable accurate 1911 style pistols. the shorter barreded one has a flared barrel at the muzzle rather than a barrel bushing. I'd go for the standard one.
    Oldgoat46
    " In Biblical times Samson slew 40,000 Philistines with the jawbone of an ass. Everyday an equal number of sales are killed by the use of the same weapon."

  19. #19

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    The best 1911 is the one in your hand when it is needed. For me it is my Norinco 1911A1.

  20. #20
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    I've run a ton of handloads through my Taurus stainless 1911, and have loved it.
    It's great to see so many affordable 1911's come into the market, and in the case of the Taurus 1911, already tuned at the factory.
    "Conceal Carry. Because when seconds count, the police are only minutes away."

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    i have that shorter one 46 and its super accurate but in his case i agree the full size model.....
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

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    For bang for the buck I would have to agree with the Taurus. The Philippines manufacturers are good basic models and are the best price. STI has one called the Spartan that is built on a Philippine frame that is pretty sweet. Good luck in your search!

  23. #23
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    There is only (ONE) , the Original 1911 !

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by shooter-x View Post
    There is only (ONE) , the Original 1911 !
    GI 1911s and 1911A1s, and Colt Commercials in good condition tend to be a bit pricey these days.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shooter-x View Post
    There is only (ONE) , the Original 1911 !
    I'd like to have a USGI 1911 for my milsurp collection.
    Not as accurate as my Taurus, but it's USGI.
    "Conceal Carry. Because when seconds count, the police are only minutes away."

  26. #26
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    Default One hell of a clone!

    Gonna have to with my Para PRX 1445 .45 ACP! Its one hell of a clone!
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    Remington just came out with one and it looks real nice, and the price is right!

  28. #28
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    Default Only a colt

    Hi lostcause39:

    As an Officer in the U. S. Army there is only "ONE" personal sidearm,
    the Colt 1911a1 .45. It was the issue weapon for officers in four
    of our wars(WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam). It served with distinction
    and is part of U. S. Army history. It might be a little more expensive
    but it will be a life time investment.

    Just an old man's 2 cents, for what its worth.

    Dan

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEasy View Post
    Hi lostcause39:

    As an Officer in the U. S. Army there is only "ONE" personal sidearm,
    the Colt 1911a1 .45. It was the issue weapon for officers in four
    of our wars(WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam). It served with distinction
    and is part of U. S. Army history. It might be a little more expensive
    but it will be a life time investment.

    Just an old man's 2 cents, for what its worth.

    Dan
    Oh, I dunno about that. But a genuine GI gun, whether it be Colt, Remington-UMC, Rock Island Arsenal, Springfield Arsenal (those two the US government facilities, not the current name-theives), Singer, Remington-Rand, Union Switch & Signal or Ithaca is the one, all right.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    If you're really serious about using it as a carry/home defense/duty weapon, go here and read, learn and ask questions:

    www.m4carbine.net
    Check in at the 1911 discussion forum. Lots of excellent info there from industry professionals, serious end users and true 1911 smiths.
    Take your time and make an informed decision.
    Good luck,
    Pat
    No one ever got into Valhalla unarmed.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Oh, I dunno about that. But a genuine GI gun, whether it be Colt, Remington-UMC, Rock Island Arsenal, Springfield Arsenal (those two the US government facilities, not the current name-theives), Singer, Remington-Rand, Union Switch & Signal or Ithaca is the one, all right.
    When I was a kid, the owner of a little family owned store owned a Singer 1911 for personal protection.

    Hope his family held onto it.
    "Conceal Carry. Because when seconds count, the police are only minutes away."

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEasy View Post
    Hi lostcause39:

    As an Officer in the U. S. Army there is only "ONE" personal sidearm,
    the Colt 1911a1 .45. It was the issue weapon for officers in four
    of our wars(WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam). It served with distinction
    and is part of U. S. Army history. It might be a little more expensive
    but it will be a life time investment.

    Just an old man's 2 cents, for what its worth.

    Dan
    I learned to detest the Army issue 1911A1's I was issued from the early 70's until the Beretta was adopted. The ones I had issued to me were scatter guns at best.

    After barely qualifying with my issue 1911A1 in 1971 in Germany, I asked the unit armorer to see if he could do anything. As the small arms officer for my battery, I expected I'd have a bit more clout. The armorer said he could replace the barrel bushing, but all of the parts he had were just as worn, or worse. He explained to me that as long as the pistol chambered, fired, and extracted he could not work-order it to ordnance support.

    It wasn't until my range buddy let me shoot his Colt Series 70 did I regain respect for the 1911A1. While the decision to adopt the Beretta* may have been less than the best choice, getting rid of those tired, worn out 1911A's was right.

    *The adoption of the Beretta 9mm was a political move. It was a quid pro quo: we buy the license for the Beretta, not a bad gun in itself as long as it was made in the Cardone Val Trompia factory. In return the Italians "let" us station the ground launched cruise missile in their country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post
    I learned to detest the Army issue 1911A1's I was issued from the early 70's until the Beretta was adopted. The ones I had issued to me were scatter guns at best.

    After barely qualifying with my issue 1911A1 in 1971 in Germany, I asked the unit armorer to see if he could do anything. As the small arms officer for my battery, I expected I'd have a bit more clout. The armorer said he could replace the barrel bushing, but all of the parts he had were just as worn, or worse. He explained to me that as long as the pistol chambered, fired, and extracted he could not work-order it to ordnance support.

    It wasn't until my range buddy let me shoot his Colt Series 70 did I regain respect for the 1911A1. While the decision to adopt the Beretta* may have been less than the best choice, getting rid of those tired, worn out 1911A's was right.
    *The adoption of the Beretta 9mm was a political move. It was a quid pro quo: we buy the license for the Beretta, not a bad gun in itself as long as it was made in the Cardone Val Trompia factory. In return the Italians "let" us station the ground launched cruise missile in their country.
    Yep - and the replacements should have been a new run of 1911s. {Probably an A2 variant, that would include an extended safety, a beaver-tail grip safety and fixed combat-style night sights). Maybe lowered ejection port and recoil buffer type spring guide.

    I'm surprised your unit armorer didn't have a selection of new parts as early as 1971. We wre still buying new barrels, slides and a variety of other things as late as 1969, because I saw them (with production dates) in maintenance battalion (DS units, eh?) small arms shops.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    I like Colt.

    I like U.S. military contract 1911s and 1911A1s.

    That's it.

    The Rock Islands aren't bad. My son has one and it offers dependable service and good value.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Yep - and the replacements should have been a new run of 1911s. {Probably an A2 variant, that would include an extended safety, a beaver-tail grip safety and fixed combat-style night sights). Maybe lowered ejection port and recoil buffer type spring guide.

    I'm surprised your unit armorer didn't have a selection of new parts as early as 1971. We wre still buying new barrels, slides and a variety of other things as late as 1969, because I saw them (with production dates) in maintenance battalion (DS units, eh?) small arms shops.
    My idea of a 1911A2 would be along the lines of the Radom P35, with a solid barrel cam lug instead of a swing link.

    I don't know what the parts supply status of DS ordnance shops and depots was in the 70's in Germany. With a shooting war going on in Viet Nam, units in Germany were in a budget squeeze for spare parts. As the battery small arms officer - additional duty, of course - I knew our 1911A1's were long past their expiration dates. We had new M16's, having only turned in our M14's a few years earlier, and new M60's. As a matter of fact, I arranged with the battery armorer to be issued an M60 if the balloon went up. (We had 20 in the battery.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post
    My idea of a 1911A2 would be along the lines of the Radom P35, with a solid barrel cam lug instead of a swing link.

    I don't know what the parts supply status of DS ordnance shops and depots was in the 70's in Germany. With a shooting war going on in Viet Nam, units in Germany were in a budget squeeze for spare parts. As the battery small arms officer - additional duty, of course - I knew our 1911A1's were long past their expiration dates. We had new M16's, having only turned in our M14's a few years earlier, and new M60's. As a matter of fact, I arranged with the battery armorer to be issued an M60 if the balloon went up. (We had 20 in the battery.)
    Ordnance shops in Germany in 1968 (last year I was there before a trip to SEA on uncle's dime) were in pretty good shape. For 1911A1 parts. Some other things were - short. Use what you had and you might or might not get timely resupply. Especially true for artillery parts. I was an OrdC LT (got my tracks and orders for Vietnam within a few days of each other in May, 1968) at the time, first in a MAintenance palnt and then a Maintenance Bn (Ordnance Equipment Officer in the Materiel Shop, and then got stolen by 2nd Support Brigade HQ), so i had a fair feel for what we had then. Three eyars alter? Well you were there, i wasn't and - I'm a bit surprised because I knew we were buying bits and peces at least through 1969/70. No new .45s, but plenty of bits and pieces to keep the old guns running,

    And yes - if I'd had my way, an A2 would have had a solid cam instead of a link, plus a solid front end like a High Power, but I'm not sure we could have gotten that through, while the minor add-ons along with new frames would have been fairly easily do-able.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    ... No new .45s, but plenty of bits and pieces to keep the old guns running,

    And yes - if I'd had my way, an A2 would have had a solid cam instead of a link, plus a solid front end like a High Power, but I'm not sure we could have gotten that through, while the minor add-ons along with new frames would have been fairly easily do-able.
    Our .45's worked, as far as cycling goes. They just scattered bullets in the general direction of the targets.

    It's been too long to remember the details, but I'm pretty sure 1911A1's were not reportable in my unit's monthly materiel readiness report. So more than likely my unit simply got no priority for 1911A1 "readiness." I don't know if DS/GS ordnance had the resources to fit a new barrel for other than the USAREUR AMU.


    As a replacement for the 1911A1, the Smith & Wesson 645 would have been closer to a better solution. But I still think a .45 built around the basic design of the Radom would be the best of the breed. I don't place much worth in DA, and the stirrup trigger works much better for me than a pivoting trigger for staying on target.

    Anyhow, the adoption of a 9mm was driven by NATO standards, and the need to provide our soldierettes with a lower recoil pistol.

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    GI 45 (as compared to a target-modified gun) requires no fitting for barrel, link or bushing. Uf you have a shop with a good supply of spares, you can do some fitting by trying various alterantes and ick the one that is tighter without being to tight to function reliably, but that is all that is required or that you can do unless you are using match-grade parts.My 19111A1, acquired at thew RheinpMAin R&G Club in the spring of 1967, was a MAP return from - somewhere. It was serviceable, but pretty rattly. Took it in to the small arms shop at the maintenance plant where I was assigned and that afternoon the only parts that it had on it when it entered that were still there were frame, plunger tube and contents and grips. Wverything else was replaced on DX basis (all the parts were serviceable as it turned out), selectively fitted. Tightened things up considerably. A number of things have been repalced since then, but the gun remains serviceable and shoots as well as most folks can hold..
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    GI 45 (as compared to a target-modified gun) requires no fitting for barrel, link or bushing. Uf you have a shop with a good supply of spares, you can do some fitting by trying various alterantes and ick the one that is tighter without being to tight to function reliably, but that is all that is required or that you can do unless you are using match-grade parts.My 19111A1, acquired at thew RheinpMAin R&G Club in the spring of 1967, was a MAP return from - somewhere. It was serviceable, but pretty rattly. Took it in to the small arms shop at the maintenance plant where I was assigned and that afternoon the only parts that it had on it when it entered that were still there were frame, plunger tube and contents and grips. Wverything else was replaced on DX basis (all the parts were serviceable as it turned out), selectively fitted. Tightened things up considerably. A number of things have been repalced since then, but the gun remains serviceable and shoots as well as most folks can hold..
    Rhein Main R&G Club: ah, nostalgia! The Heidelberg R&G was also a great place; they had an adjoining range too.

    Anyhow, your story ilustrates my point. You were able to achieve "selectively fitted" while any other work-order job would have been pushed through the shop as fast as possible.

    I suspect my battery armorer could have done a decent tune up on the unit's 1911A1's too if he had the same selection of parts you had, but the company/battery PLL was rather limited, and the USAREUR IG was death, in those days, on units that stocked parts in excess of what was authorized.

  40. #40
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    Just my two cents. As one who has gone armed for the last 15 years on the mean streets of Houston, TX, I carry a 1911. Not a choice to be taken lightly. As long as you remember the weapon needs constant maintaining ie:run it wet, you'll be ok. To repeat an earlier post, get the one you are happy with, and learn to shoot it. Brand is like everything else, you do pay more for some names. I have carried a Colt series 80, Kimber TLE, Wilson CQB, and currently a Les Baer Police Special. All were good guns. I have owned several Colt's, Springfield Armory's, and Military 1911's. For me, I carry the Les Baer because out of the box I had no issues with reliability, accuracy, or customer service.

    Yes it is pricey, but the dept I work for we are required to purchase our own weapons so it is a Tax write-off. Is it better than say a Para or a Springfield. Not really, just personal preference. I have over 9 K rounds through the gun as of 2004 and it has not missed a step.

    The Taurus 1911 is a lot of gun for the money, just like the early Kimbers were. Remington's new entry is nice looking, and reasonably priced. Just buy what you are happy with, spend money on ammo and make sure the thing will run.

    Good Luck
    /Steve C

    Lithgow 1920 No I MK III
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    Long Branch 1944 No 4 MK I*
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    Fazarkley FTR 47 No 4 MK II
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  41. #41
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    I have never had a hitch out of my Springfield Armory GI model that ive had about 2 years. itll put all 7 rounds in the x-ring very time at 10 yards. my dad, who is a deputy sheriff and has carried various 1911s for 9 years (switched from a Glock 21) says that the Taurus PT1911 is his favorite with the Para Ordnance SSP next best.
    Listen to me. Forests burn 'cos they have to. And oceans, they go up and down 'cos they have to. I don't think we're that different. If you want to get through this you have to start seeing it for what it is. It's something we do all the time because we're good at it. And we're good at it because we're used to it. And we're used to it because we do it all the time.

  42. #42
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    Yes you can fix any problem with a 1911. But because the actions of all the components is so interrelated it may take a year or 2 of headscratching since you may have 2 or more faults that cause problems that are very hard to track down.

    So if you are a beginner and don't have a really good 1911 gunsmith readily available you had best get a warrantied production gun that comes with what you want. The last thing you want to do is get a bottom of the line or used pistol and try to build it into what you really want.
    Pretty much all the brands* mentioned here are fine pistols but for the price, and for general use and beginning competition you can't beat an Armscor (Rock Island) Tactical. I'd buy it before the less expensive GI models because it has a lot of desireable upgrades at a very modest price increase.
    If you're interested in bullseye competition then the Armscor Match is a fine hand-fitted pistol to start with at a couple $hundred more.

    * Colt isn't really the same company that existed before the 1986 strike, the 1992 bankruptcy and the 1994 purchase by Zikha which nearly wrecked it.
    Last edited by jjk308; 04-09-2011 at 08:24 AM.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  43. #43
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    Not hijacking here, but I ran across this thread from another forum that seems to imply 1911's are still being used in some way today (or at least up to a few years ago). Check page 4 of the thread for representative pics. I don't know a lot about current issue sidearms, but can anyone shed any light on this or offer up any supporting info?

    http://forums.1911forum.com/showthre...=232209&page=4

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    i agree 99% from experience with 5 of them
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  45. #45
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    Clyde is offline Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by sovblocgunfan View Post
    Not hijacking here, but I ran across this thread from another forum that seems to imply 1911's are still being used in some way today (or at least up to a few years ago). Check page 4 of the thread for representative pics. I don't know a lot about current issue sidearms, but can anyone shed any light on this or offer up any supporting info?

    http://forums.1911forum.com/showthre...=232209&page=4
    Can't give a source (memory is just blank), but i know I have seen mention of 1911/1911A1 (as well as other things chambered for 45 ACP instead of 9x19 NATO) being in issue for some Special Ops folks. And a recently retired LTC of my acquaintence mentioned that there are still some folks with them, whilst lamenting that he was stuck (as an Infantry officer in airborne or mech units) with a M-9. Of course, John learned to shoot with a 1911 (actually a 1911, not an A1) courtesy of his Dad before he was in college, so he was spoiled from the start....
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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