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Thread: I need a tutorial on South American Mausers

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    Question I need a tutorial on South American Mausers

    I keep seeing Mausers from various South American countries on here and around the web, but I have not had much luck finding out which are the most collectible, which models make the best shooters and all that fun stuff. I am reluctant to trust everything I read on the web, but perhaps you folk can direct me to the sites with the least BS.

    Thanks

    Steve

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    You found what you are looking for here! As for which are "the most collectible" that's kind of up to you. Most all Mauser rifles in good shape with good bores will out shoot most modern rifles. Remember these rifles were made from the best materials with true old world craftsmanship. Probably the best thing you can do is start buying books on Mauser rifles. Spend your hard earned $$ on books so you can educate yourself and avoid buying mismatched or poor condition rifles. Probably the two most available South American Mauser rifles which you can still obtain in excellent condition are the Argentinian 1909 long rifle and the Brazilian 1908 long rifle. Either of these would make a great rifle to start a collection as well as shoot very accurately. They are also very attractive rifles. I see them for sale regularly on the various on line gun auctions.

    Below is a photo of what they look like. I purchased these over the last year. The Brazilian is the bottom rifle.


    the following books would be a good place for you to obtain good info:
    1) MAUSER MILITARY RIFLES OF THE WORLD By Robert Ball (fourth edition)
    2) STANDARD CATALOG OF MILITARY FIREARMS By Phillip Peterson
    3) CROWN JEWELS THE MAUSER IN SWEDEN By Dana Jones

    I wouldn't limit your self to only South American Mauser rifles The Swedish Mauser rifles are one of the best made and most accurate military rifles ever made.
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    Nice there Jimmy!
    Here's a Chilean 1895. Not a very good pic, it's a gorgeous rifle. Not mine. I cleaned it up for a friend. The second is a model43 Spanish Oviedo dated 1945. Watch out for Spanish 7.62x51 conversions. I understand there are 'soft steel' issues.
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    Here's a link to a forum dedicated soley to Span. Am. Military rifles... http://parallaxscurioandrelicfirearm....com/forums/83
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    Updated on 22 June 2008, and March, 2010, April 2011

    Hi Steve,
    Here's my take for a quick tutorial of South American Mausers made in Europe which are available in matching numbered collectable condition, which is usually NRA Very Good. (Price estimates are broad brush and can vary wildly at times!)

    1. Argentina: Bought large numbers of Mauser long rifles and carbines, 1891 to 1918, Models 1891 and 1898. Supply: Plentiful! Thousands are in the North American collector market, many can be found in unissued condition. Makers include Ludwig Loewe and DWM. (See JimmyC's excellent M.1909 above) Local production began in mid-20th century. High quality when in matching, little used original condition. Price Range: $300 to 1500. The Argentine M1891 long rifle is the most common early Mauser rifle available in mint condition except for the German Army's M71/84. Unfortunately, most Model 1891 long rifles had their crests removed by the Argentine Government before being sold as surplus in 1960 or so. A price premium should be expected when purchasing an Argentine M1891 with its crest in tact. There are also some M1891 long rifles which are rare: rifles marked for use in Argentine military acacdemies and the M1891 with its original Gewehr 88-type rear sight assembly fall into this category.

    2. Brazil: Hundreds of thousands of rifles and carbines bought from Belgium (FN), Germany (Loewe, DWM, Mauser Oberndorf) and Czechoslovakia (Brno), 1894 to 1935. Supply: Plentiful! Many thousands are in the North American collector market, many M1908 (See JimmyC's excellent M.1908 above) and M1935's can be found in unissued condition. No local significant production, but many rebuild programs started in the mid-20th century. High quality when in matching, little used, original condition. Price Range: $300 to $1500. The M1904 carbine (2,000 made) and the M1908 DWM carbines, and the M1894 DWM-made Brazilian Navy models are some of the rarest Brazilian Mauser rifles in collectible (NRA Very Good) condition known. Second to these are the standard FN and Loewe-made M1894's. They were widely imported in loathsome condition, and NRA Good or Very Good or better rifle and carbines are truly rare. Expect to pay heavily for these if buying from a knowledgeable seller.

    3. Chile: Bought large numbers of Mauser long rifles and carbines between 1895 to 1935, Model 1895's from Loewe and DWM, Model 1912's from Steyr and M1935 carbines from Mauser Oberndorf. Supply: Plentiful! Thousands are in the North American collector market, many can be found in unissued condition. No local production, but local conversions to 7.62 NATO in mid-20th century are common. High quality when in matching, little used original condition. Price Range: $400 to $1500. The Chilean M1895 long rifle is one of the most common early Mauser rifles available in mint condition. The toughest rifle to find are the M1895 short rifle with ther 21 inch barrel and second/runner up is the M1895 carbine with the 17-18 inch barrel. Both are around in numbers, but almost always are in poor to fair condition.

    4. Venezuela: Bought very small numbers of Mauser rifles and carbines before WW I, now almost totally unknown. Purchased tens of thousands of Belgian-made FN M1930 short rifles and carbines, 1935 to 1955. The supply of the FN-made Mausers is plentiful! Thousands of FN Model 1930 short rifles (23.5" barrels) are in the North Armerican collector market, and many can be found in unissued condition. No local production. High quality when in matching, little used original condition. Price Range: $400 to $1000. The Venezuelan M1930 rifle is the most common WW II era Mauser rifle available in mint condition.

    5. Peru: Purchased a fair number of Mauser rifles from Argentina (M1891's with a Peruvian crest), M1909 Gewehr 98-type rifles from Oberndorf, and later, after WW I, from Belgium (FN) and Czechoslovakia (Brno). The Czechoslovak rifles (Vz.32) in decent condition are ultra rare. The Belgian/FN-made M1935 short rifles (both 7.65 and .30-06 versions) are common. The carbine version of the Model 1935 with a 17-18 inch barrel is rare. I've only seen 3-4 of these, and I suspect very few were delivered. Many 35's were converted to .30-06 after WW II. No local production. High quality when in matching, little used original condition. Price Range: $400 to $2000 for a matching unissued M1909 or NRA VG conditon Vz.32.

    6. Colombia: Purchased many rifles from Belgium (FN), Austria (Steyr) and Czechoslovakia (CZ Brno) for use in 60 years of civil war. Most if not all have been used up and rebuilt. Few if any are available in original matching condition, although many thousands were sold surplus here. Prices are all over the board, but generally low reflecting the usually deplorable conditon of these much-used rifles. The pre-WWI Colombian Model 1912's made ar Steyr, both rifle and carbine) are much sought after, but rarely if ever seen with all original parts. Small numbers of ex-Imperial German Gewehr 98's, rebuilt in Liege in the 1930's, are also encountered.

    7. Ecuador: I have never seen one which was manufactured and crested for this country. They reportedly did use Mausers, but they were acquired on the secondary market (like their Gewehr 88's and Gewehr 71/84's) and/or purchased without markings.

    8. Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia: All three countries purchased tens of thousands of Mauser rifles in Europe from Belgium, Spain, Czechoslovakia and Germany, 1900 to 1939. Bolivia even purchased M1891 long rifles from Argentina. However, none of these countries have ever sold their Mausers on the world surplus arms market. As a result, examples of these rifles are virtually unknown on the collector market in North America. All rifles from these countries in original matching condition are very rare...except for the Uruguayan M1871 Mauser converted in France to 6.5mm. This rifle is one of the most common early Mausers around, and is also one of the most expensive, which is seemingly in contradiction to the fact that its ammunition has not been available for a century.

    In summary, if you are looking for high quality and condition South American Mausers, here is a list of what in my opinion are the nine most commonly available original rifles which are also the easiest to find in NRA VG, excellent or better condition:
    1. Argentina: Model 1891 long rifle (Loewe/DWM)
    2. Argentina: Model 1909 long rifle (DWM)
    3. Brazil: Model 1908 long rifle (DWM)
    4. Brazil: Model 1935 long rifle (Mauser Oberndorf)
    5. Chile: Model 1895 long rifle (Loewe/DWM)
    6. Chile: Model 1912 long rifle (Steyr)
    7. Chile: Model 1935 Police Carbine (Mauser Oberndorf)
    8. Venezuela: Model 1930 Short rifle (FN)
    9. Peru: M1935 short rifle (FN)

    If money is not a major concern, and if you are in the U.S.A., I would guess that you could own these nine rifles in 60 days or less, using the internet and the phone persistantly.

    All of the rifles listed above are very collectible, and with the right ammunition and barrel condition, have been reported by forum members to be very good shooters.

    From the list above, only the Argentine M.1891 made by Ludwig Loewe and Co is an antique by BATF rules. All other rifles have to be acquired per your local purchase regs, or from an FFL dealer, or with your C&R FFL if from an out-of-state source.
    Regards,
    John
    Last edited by John Wall; 05-22-2012 at 11:24 AM. Reason: extra information, typos

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wall View Post
    ...
    8. Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia
    All three countries purchased tens of thousands of Mauser rifles in Europe from Belgium, Spain, Czechoslovakia and Germany, 1900 to 1939. Bolivia even purchased M1891 from Argentina. None of these countries have ever sold their Mausers on the world market. As a result, these rifles are virtually unkown on the collector market in North America. All rifles from these countries in original matching condition are very rare.
    Regards,
    John
    Which means you only have one or two of each?!?!

    Nice tutorial. Only 6 more continents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jebber View Post
    Which means you only have one or two of each?!?!

    Nice tutorial. Only 6 more continents.
    Hi John,
    Actually, still looking for most of them! And only three continents to go. Australia is a Mauser No-Show....and we won't know if the Polar regions have Mausers until the big thaw is over. But stay tuned since that's scheduled for next week.
    Last edited by John Wall; 01-14-2008 at 01:11 PM.

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    Default Mauser Information

    That was a great bit of information on the South American Mausers.

    I have a long way to go with my collection. I am up to 100 Mausers and most are the usual models. I only have a few books on Mausers, by Ball, Olson, and the Collector Grade K98 1934 - 1945. I heard there is another great Mauser book out for something $140 but I haven't heard any reviews.

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    I'd just point out that all those little central american countries like Costa Rica, Guatemala, and the like are all even more rare and expensive than the South American rifles listed.

    In general, you'll find the Contract Mausers in three flavors:

    1. Minty and expensive, possibly the best-made rifles ever, with the best fit and finish you'll ever find. I don't really think any country is better than another in terms of a like-new rifles quality.

    2. Used, issued, or with the crest removed. Shooter grade, but same workmanship. Often lacking the big neat picture of the national crest stamped on the reciever ring.

    3. Sporter- so many of these were imported in the sixties and commercially sporterized that if you just want a gun that shoots good and has magnificent quality, you shouldn't have much trouble finding a cut-down one. Argentine 1891 and 1909s are particularly commonly ruined like this.
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    I frequently visit Uruguay, where I keep a summer house, and for years tried to get the Uruguayan's Army bolt rifle..it is almost impossible and not only that, in Uruguay is illegal to own any firearm whose caliber is or was used by any of its armed forces-The only way to get the Mauser would be if the country decides to export their old inventory as surplus-

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    Thanks guys for all the great info!
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    Default Thanks!!

    WOW! Great response and a whole chunk of info to digest. Just what I was looking for. Cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LVSteve View Post
    WOW! Great response and a whole chunk of info to digest. Just what I was looking for. Cheers.
    Hi Steve,
    You're most welcome. Let me know if you want to expand this to Central America as well. I was rushed this morning (blizzard in Boston) and purposely left out that part of the world.
    Regards,
    John
    Last edited by John Wall; 01-14-2008 at 03:14 PM.

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    Default Sales of Paraguayan and Uruguayan Mausers.

    IIRC, ads from Ye Ole Hunter in the 60s had Paraguayan Long Mausers(probably made in Oviedo) for sale, ca. US$29,95!.
    Also, I understand Uruguay (R.O.U.-Republica Oriental del Uruguay) did release some Mausers some time back, with all going to Germany via Frankonia Jagd due to C&R imports not allowed into the US at the time.
    HTH
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    I'm not a big fan of scrolling down through a bunch of stickies on each forum, but if John Wall's excellent summary doesn't merit a sticky, nothing does!!!

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    Then, there's the Carribean, with Mausers from Haiti and the Dominican Republic...
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    Hi Bean,
    Good point about the Carribean. And don't forget about North America where tens of thousands of Model 1890 (Hopkins and Allen), M1893 (Enfield P14/M1917)and M1898 (M.1903) varients were manufactured.
    Regards,
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by okrana View Post
    IIRC, ads from Ye Ole Hunter in the 60s had Paraguayan Long Mausers(probably made in Oviedo) for sale, ca. US$29,95!.
    Also, I understand Uruguay (R.O.U.-Republica Oriental del Uruguay) did release some Mausers some time back, with all going to Germany via Frankonia Jagd due to C&R imports not allowed into the US at the time.
    HTH
    Okrana
    Hi Okrana,
    You have a great memory! I'd forgotten about the Paraguayan ads, but you are correct that Yer Olde Hunter was selling these rifles. I have a binder or two full of these old ads and found the ones you mentioned. If I recall correctly, the Oviedo rifles (saw two the other day!) were said to have been imported from Spain when Sam Cummings bought out Franco's Spanish Civil War surplus arms.

    The story about the Uruguayan Mausers in Germany also rings true. I've seen three or four for sale in German auctions. I believe Carcano posted about one a few years ago.
    Regards,
    John

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    I have a Uruguayan 1908 rifle. The markings (like the one in Ball's book) are much like the Brazilian '08 rifle, except for the string of marks above the serial#. I believe they may be proofs from reimport into Germany? Mine looks much like the one pictured in that they were buffed and refinished. It is pretty but I would rather it wasn;t done. JL

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Wall View Post
    5. Peru: Purchased a fair number of Mauser rifles from Argentina (M1891's with a Peruvian crest), M1909 Gewehr 98-type rifles from Obernbdorf, and later, after WW I, from Belgium (FN) and Czechoslovakia (Brno). The Czechoslovak rifles (Vz.32) in decent condition are rare, the Belgian M1935's are common. Many 35's converted to .30-06 after WW II. No local production. High quality when in matching, little used original condition. Price Range: $400 to $2000 for a matching unissued M1909.
    wow, 2000 for a matching unissued 1909 version? what would you say about two unissued ones with consecutive serials?

    i thought the 900/each price tag was a little steep, but maybe i should visit that vendor again this next show and see if he still has them...

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    Great prices! I would buy both, keep one, and resell the second to pay for itself and all or part of the first rifle.
    Regards,
    John

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    ah, the guy wasnt there today. and no luck with any other latin american mausers, minus a rust bucket brazilian (but i wouldnt classify that as "luck")

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    Default But???

    Great tutorial Mr. Wall, and thank you. I just have one question. You list the 1935 Chilean Police Carbine as one of the 8 most common and easy to find. However, I hear less than 10,000 were in the original contract, divided into three services. Also, I can only find two on the internet tonight (okay, only a half hour of surfing) and they are going for $600 and $1275. Or is this an acceptable price range?

    Okay, two questions. If I want a 7mm Mauser to shoot and mess with, what would you recommend as a common-as-dirt-so-if-I-chop-the-barrel-I-won't-cry-20-years-from-now gun?
    M.
    Last edited by lordchang; 01-19-2008 at 10:09 PM.

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    lordchang, your question - "If I want a 7mm Mauser to shoot and mess with, what would you recommend as a common-as-dirt-so-if-I-chop-the-barrel-I-won't-cry-20-years-from-now gun?" - might not be considered appropriate on the Military Mauser Forum. Remember that just because a firearm type was manufactured in fairly large quantity does not necessarily mean that a large number have survived. You may want to ask it on one of the forums here at Gunboards (Commercial and Military Sporting Arms Forum? at: http://forums.gunboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=22 ) that addresses sporterization a little more freely.

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    TP:

    Well, actually, I would rather ask that here because I believe this forum would have better knowledge of the models that are, in fact, rarer, whether manufactured in large numbers or small. I find the folks on the "Cut-And-Chop" forums aren't that, uhm, shall we say grounded in facts (such as survival rates) versus hearsay, common misperception and "I heard it a lot, so it must be true, therefore I will repeat." I feel that the folks on THIS forum know the factual rarity of models. Hence my question about actual rarity of the Chilean models, as well as other models that might have survived in huge numbers.

    But no matter; if no one answers, I will take the question elsewhere.

    Thanks for the reply.
    Last edited by lordchang; 01-21-2008 at 11:50 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordchang View Post
    Great tutorial Mr. Wall, and thank you. I just have one question. You list the 1935 Chilean Police Carbine as one of the 8 most common and easy to find. However, I hear less than 10,000 were in the original contract, divided into three services. Also, I can only find two on the internet tonight (okay, only a half hour of surfing) and they are going for $600 and $1275. Or is this an acceptable price range?

    Okay, two questions. If I want a 7mm Mauser to shoot and mess with, what would you recommend as a common-as-dirt-so-if-I-chop-the-barrel-I-won't-cry-20-years-from-now gun?
    M.
    Hi Lordchang,
    Since you were able to find two high quality Chilean carbines in half an hour, I would have to say that that is a common Mauser. Nice work! There were 5,000 of these carbines brought into the USA in the 1980's before the repeal of the 1968 GCA (which did not apply to surplus POLICE weapons). Price is another issue! If only we could do this with Bolivian M.1907 carbines!

    Your point about survival rates is well taken. The Chilean 35's saw service for years, but it appears to have been gentle service to say the least. It may be significant, but I don't think I have ever seen a Chilean '35 carbine which has been sporterized. It may be that these were imported at a time when the value of the rifle in its original collectible condition was more appreciated than it would have been twenty years earlier.

    As far as a common-as-dirt 7 mm rifle, there are many, many battered and bruised Brazilian M1908 long rifles made by DWM around which are good candidates for what you're looking for. If I wanted to find a rifle like this, I would go to one of the many local gun auctions here on New England where sporterized military rifles turn up in abundance. If you live in an area where this is an option, you have some of your work done for you, and who knows...you might find one you'd like to rescue! Enjoy the hunt!
    Best Regards,
    John
    Last edited by John Wall; 04-13-2011 at 02:58 PM. Reason: spelling

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordchang View Post
    TP:

    Well, actually, I would rather ask that here because I believe this forum would have better knowledge of the models that are, in fact, rarer, whether manufactured in large numbers or small. I find the folks on the "Cut-And-Chop" forums aren't that, uhm, shall we say grounded in facts (such as survival rates) versus hearsay, common misperception and "I heard it a lot, so it must be true, therefore I will repeat." I feel that the folks on THIS forum know the factual rarity of models. Hence my question about actual rarity of the Chilean models, as well as other models that might have survived in huge numbers.

    But no matter; if no one answers, I will take the question elsewhere.

    Thanks for the reply.





    Well answered.

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    Default So ...

    I don't know...two in a half hour is not a lot to me. I've searched since we started discussing and those are the only two 1935s I could find that were for sale. Period.

    And price IS another question. So, Mr. Wall, what do you estimate is a reasonable range of prices for complete and not totally trashed Chileans?

    I have one with little bluing on it, but it is complete and not pitted anywhere I can find. (Good thing I found this forum. I was about to start tinkering with it ...)

    M.

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    Hi M.,
    I've not seen a Chilean M1935 priced below $250, so that general vicinity might be where you could place your expectations for a worn carbine.
    Regards.
    John

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    John, I sold a couple last year for around $250 on the trader and they went pretty quick. Matching with slings and nice bores but finish was mostly gone. JL

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    Default South American Mausers

    If you want to add some spice to your search, try limiting the hunt to the short barrel police or cavalry carbines - FN, Steyr, and Czech production mostly. They are really cute and becoming more and more rare.

    Note that there is a M1909 full stock rifle that appears to be a police carbine, but is actually a full stock rifle, a la K98 barrel length. Argentina did use a nice little M1891 carbine that is still to be found on the US market, similar in size to the neat Swedish M1894 carbines.

    LLS

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    How short is "short"?

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    Hi M.,
    Barrel lengths for Mauser military rifles generally, but not always, fall into these five (5) ranges:

    1. 15.5 to 17.5 inches: ultra short, very few known, the Mexican M1924 and Belgian police M1889 carbines coming to mind

    2. 17-18 inch range: many known, most FN M1930 police and cavalry carbines etc.

    3. 19.5 inch: Czechoslovak Vz.33 if I recall correctly

    4. 21.5 inch (55 cm) Steyr M.1912 short rifles, several Mauser 1930's police carbines (Chile, Brazil, Columbia, Uruguay, Argentina, China, etc)

    5. 23.5 inch (60 cm): the standard length for "universal" military rifles like the FN M1930, StandardModell, K98k, Vz.24 etc.

    6. 29+ inch (69 cm), the standard length for late 19th/early 20th century Mauser infantry rifles.

    Depending on your personal definition of "short" and "carbine", any of the above could be possible. I would guess that llsierra was talking about numbers 1 or 2.
    Regards,
    John
    Last edited by John Wall; 02-02-2008 at 09:41 AM.

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    Here is a nice 17 1/2 Chilian calvary carbine in 7mm. Its fun to shoot!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2.JPG   4.JPG  

  34. #34

    Default South American Mausers-Paraguay

    According to some reports, Paraguay had purchased by the late 20s, as part of a re-armament program the following:
    8643 Mauser rifles
    1900 Mauser carbines
    5 millions rds-half in strippers

    By the outbreak of the Chaco War they had:
    1500 Mauser Model 1907
    2500 Chilean model Mausers
    10,363 Spanish Mausers(interesting sidestory on that, vis a vis the alleged blowing up of these Spanish Mausers,due according to some sources,of improper reloading of cartridges with the wrong powder!)
    7000 Belgian Mausers, Model 1930 "mosquetones" I asssume are short rifles)
    A total of 26,500,000 rds of ammo.

    During the war they purchased:
    19,000 Mausers with accessories. Of these 4,000 arrived after the end of hostilities, 10,ooo made by " Maxim 'Mauser Verkefeld'" in Germany and 9000 made by "Herstal of Liege, Belgium".

    Further, they captured 28,030 from the Bolivians, of which approx. 10% were unusable.

    Unfortunately, due to the usage of "slang names" for the various weapons,accounting not entirely accurate for different reasons,bad memories,etc. some of data may be conflicting.

    It would be interesting to know what the Bolivian take on this conflict was!

    Cordially,
    Okrana

  35. #35
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    Default "Short"

    Yes, per John's review, I was talking about "Short" meaning the sub twenty inch carbines. They have a lot of muzzle blast, but I suppose the "Policia" using them wanted that sort of effect upon the populace. The FN 1924 for Mexico, as John mentions, is particularly short and unusual.

    LLS

  36. #36
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    'Barnes & Noble Books' has a fairly thick book which only describes the various Mauser rifles.
    Looked through it about three weeks ago.
    Last edited by Laufer; 06-07-2008 at 01:16 AM.

  37. #37
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    Default

    There appear to be few South American Mausers in 7 mm (7x57), and many Spanish 7mms were converted.

    But there is a website which tonight advertises 7x57 at about $.16.9/round.
    Last edited by Laufer; 07-20-2008 at 08:37 PM.

  38. #38
    John Wall's Avatar
    John Wall is offline Diamond Member with Oak Leaves and Swords
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    All,
    I just updated the South American Survey a bit and will gradually add the Central American and Carribean rifles too. Sorry, but I forgot all about this thread!
    Best Regards,
    John

  39. #39
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    Default

    Question for all:
    I just got what was supposed to be a Peruvian 1891 aka Argentine mauser for $98.
    When it arrived, I found it had been severely "bubbaized" and the stock, which was advertised as "cracked" was actually split almost in thirds. That's the bad. The good is that the bolt, receiver, barrel and magazine all match although the barrel has been cut short and for a sight and the bolt bent. There are no markings that indicate Peruvian heritage, just the usual Argentine stamps. The serial # is W43xx. Would you keep this and try to fix the stock(which at one time was a nice one) and just shoot it or return it? The seller has indicated that he will take it back and return my $$, but in looking at it again, I just wonder???? thanks

  40. #40

    Default

    When I dated a Colombian girl I wanted a Colombian rifle to go with her....oh well, no longer date the girl and never found a rifle! LOL

    GREG

  41. #41
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    Default

    Which model is it 1905 or 1909, for Peru (and also Turky), the one which had an action total length equal to '98 but bolt shorter a few millimeters, a pear shaped lever end and barrel thread diameter much smaller than std '98 ?
    Just hasd seen bare actions

  42. #42
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    Default

    dedeparis, I believe you are talking about the Model 1903 Turk when you are talking about the short action, the pear shaped handle, and the high charging hump. If I am wrong, someone chime in and correct me here.

  43. #43
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    Default Other good condition Mausers

    I am surprised none of the other responders did not mention the Steyr made Persian Mausers (8mm but so what). Since like the Swedes they did not have a war during the time they purchased them (the Iraq war happened after they had gone to semi auto infantry weapons) all of those I have seen are in excellent shape and with a good load are as accurate as most of the others.
    I would not however recommend a Mauser supplied to Haiti, I don't care how the seller raves about it.
    Another thing, depanding on where you live check out the pawn shops.
    Occasionnally you can find some acceptable ones there and most pawnshop owners will haggle.

  44. #44
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    Default To John Wall about Mauser Barrel Lengths

    You need to add to the list of 15" - 17.5" the Venezuelian "short rifle" mine measures out at 17.5 and has no evidence of being cut or otherwise modified. The little SOB will make you regret forgetting your "sissy pad" after a match of 50+ rounds.

  45. #45
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    Default Argentine 1891 carbine

    These are pictures of my 1891 Engineers Carbine. It is all original, or it may have been arsenal rebuilt at some time. I hand picked this from a bunch of them at J&G about 12 years ago. I believe I paid 150 dollars for it.

    It's better than Very Good condition. I've never fired it, but I may some day.

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