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Thread: L7A1 9mm

  1. #1
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    Default L7A1 9mm

    yiiiiiyyyyyyyy
    Last edited by MK TX; 02-14-2013 at 09:13 PM.

  2. #2
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    Real L7a1 is very scarce, if it doesn't identify it as such on the headstamp you probably have common Hirtenberg 9mm ammo. People have faked it too so I wouldn't necessarily believe anything stenciled on the crate.

  3. #3
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    Hirtebnberger issued a warning on the ATF website about this ammo:

    9 X 19 MM Hirtenberger AG
    WARNING: Austrian ammunition maker Hirtenberger AG has put the word out concerning a quantity of its 9x19 mm ammunition that is "unique for use in any handgun." According to a November 7 BATF Industry News release. "The ammunition was loaded to produce pressures far in excess of that intended for use in handguns...This ammunition should not be fired." The ammunition was produced for the British Ministry of Defense from 1990 through 1992 for use in submachine guns "under adverse conditions" and carries the "L7A1" designation. While BATF is unaware of this ammunition being imported into the U.S., the maker advises that up to 12 million rounds were sold recently on the world surplus market.
    The ammunition covered by this warning can be identified by the following headstamps:
    12 o’clock position: HP
    3 o’clock position: 90, 91, or 92
    6 o’clock position: L7A1
    9 o’clock position: a cross within a circle
    For additional information contact BATF at (202) 927-8320.
    Source: BATF Bulletin, November 7, 1996
    American Rifleman, January 1997; page 6
    IAA Journal, Jan./Feb. 1997; page 4
    It works well in 9mm ARs and would probably be great in a semi-auto Suomi or Sterling...shooting it in a pistol may result in serious injuries.

  4. #4
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    The HK is what it was designed for so you should be in good shape

  5. #5
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    Too hot for a quality locked breech handgun.... but OK in a blow back AR-15 9mm?

    Enough of that would batter my Colt 9mm AR a bit. It functions with some pretty
    week sister 9mm.
    "Saigon Tea, 60 P, you no buy you di di DI!"

  6. #6
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    I have half a box or so left. I shot it in my Olympic Arms 9mm AR, straight blowback. Olympic Arms said it would be ok to shoot - but I wouldn't make a habit of it. I suspect it would shoot great in my Suomi K31 semi or my Sterling; probably run like a champ in my Uzi semi-auto too.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by izzytok46 View Post
    The HK is what it was designed for so you should be in good shape
    My understanding is that L7A1 was manufactured for use by the British army in Sterling SMGs, not HK MP5s etc.

    It was for use in arctic warfare as it had been found that in the extremely low temperatures in northern Norway normal Mark 2z ammo did not function well, and a higher pressure round was needed.

    Regards
    TonyE
    British military small arms and ammunition,
    Researcher, collector and pedant.
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/home

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammolab View Post
    Too hot for a quality locked breech handgun.... but OK in a blow back AR-15 9mm?

    Enough of that would batter my Colt 9mm AR a bit. It functions with some pretty

    week sister 9mm.
    I would install a stronger recoil spring. Should be fine then. On the subject of Blowbacks, how tough are the Marlin Camp 9s? I know about the buffers and hammer struts, I mean action strength? The one I have has a measured 23# plus spring in it like that since I purchased it at a gun show. Had a Blackjack buffer in it as well. I am wondering what the heck they were shooting in it...

  9. #9
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    The Brits weren't using sterlings anymore, it was for British MP5's

  10. #10
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    I beg to disagree. This ammunition was made in 1991-2 and the Sterling remained in front line service until 1994 when it was replaced by the 5.56mm L85A1 rifle. The MP5 was used by British special forces (and police) but was never a mainstream infantry weapon.

    Regards
    TonyE
    British military small arms and ammunition,
    Researcher, collector and pedant.
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/home

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