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Thread: husqvarna 9000

  1. #1
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    Default husqvarna 9000

    Hey guys,
    my hunting buddy has one of these (Husqvarna 9000) rifles in 30-06, appears to be push feed but shoots very well, Stock needs to be refinished and not only would I like to know a bit about this model would any of you know what original stock finish was used ?

  2. #2
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    The model 9000 is what we call here a 1900 action rifle. The original finish on a model 9000 was oil. The model 8000 had a shiny thick plastic finish.
    Steve

  3. #3
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    Thanks Steve,
    he's decided to use tru oil on it

  4. #4
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    strong, accurate, reliable best actions components made and they love 190, 180, 165 Federal or other quality ammo....

  5. #5
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    Hey gents, I own two 1640 HVA's, one is a Sears model 51 lightweight, and I'm generally a Mauser CRF kinda guy, but my LGS has a VERY nice Push feed Husky, so I'm assuming it's the 1900 series as stated above? My question is, are these push feed actions as desirable to own as the small ring 1640's, in terms of quality, operation, etc.? When did Husqvarna switch from a Mauser action to the push feed? How were they marketed in the U.S.?
    Thanks for your replies.

  6. #6
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    Hi elmbow,

    1900 series rifles are just as desirable and maybe a little more so in certain circles. Tradewinds was the USA Importer/distributor of HVA firearms. Husqvarna began production of the 1900 in 1967 and continued to 1970 when Husqvarna rifle making was taken over by FFV/Carl Gustaf. FFV/CG continued production until 1975-77. Husqvarna also made Smith & Wesson rifles which are 1900 series and simply stamped with the Smith & Wesson name. Quality is exceptionally high.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  7. #7
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    Were all the Smith & Wesson labeled rifles 1900 series actions or were some of the early ones 1640 actions? What is the easiest way to tell the difference between the two series?

    Thanks and take care,

    Mike
    <><

  8. #8
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    Hi Mike,

    Thanks for the reminder, the first Smith & Wessons were 1640 rifles and I don't remember if it was 1967 or 1968 when the switch to 1900 rifles was made. Easiest way to tell a 1640 from a 1900 is the prominent extractor on the side of the bolt of the 1640 and lack thereof on the 1900. The rear shroud on the 1640 also is the very familiar Mauser type shroud versus the sleek, streamlined shroud of the 1900.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  9. #9
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    1900 bolts had two slanted caming locking lugs taken out by pulling trigger all the way back....
    bolt has a key extension that matches the receiver race way in the action for wobble free action...
    back of bolt shroud modern not like mauser.....
    screw adjustable trigger on back of action tang....
    1900 never had steel floor plates...one shape long oval type....

    1900 have a little more modern looking stocks going on into carl gustaf changes in grip thickness..




    1640 actions have on left side small cheep looking bolt release.....
    most are not adl. trigger
    steel early shaped like Mauser's cheep release, late alum floor plates long oval like 1900.....
    1640 these two type floor plates had a different shapes from near the front action screw....
    wobbling in bolt more pronounced...
    two locking lugs on bolt not cam-ming or slanted...more like mausers...

    both are "push feeds in a emerency"....nothing wrong or bad about that in my openion.....
    some writers say unless your hunting dangerous game in Africa some say?

    i say if i had to drop a shell in the action push feed works faster to reload...
    Mauser's you must load the clip to get under the extractor under the extractor...taking more time!!!!

    just general comments
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 12-08-2011 at 06:40 PM. Reason: typo

  10. #10
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    As a follow up, here's the detail on that 9000. It is a Tradewinds (Husqvarna Vapenfabrics on the barrel), 9000 in 7mm Rem mag. Stock looks to be a lacquer type finish with a rosewood forend tip, Pachymeyr ribbed black pad, monte carlo, (i.e weatherby style) cheekpiece and some ~18 lpi checkering. Wood to metal fit is excellent, no visible cracks, but is about 70% on the finish and needs some TLC. The metal is good, 90% on bluing. The floorplate assembly is alloy and looks much better than my 1640's. barrel mounted fold down rear sight and ramped front. Weaver bases, tip off rings and an old B&L variable scope, (actually in decent shape). $400 out the door, which I think is a good price, not too many Swedish firearms collectors in my AO.
    I am not a collector, I shoot my guns, this one is not a caliber I want and would contemplate rebarreling to something else, 25.06 maybe. If it is worth keeping in original condition I might do that too.
    so, consensus on this piece???

    Elmbow

  11. #11
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    ....."both are push feeds"?????????

    I thought the 1640 was the HVA small ring mauser??? s'plain please.

  12. #12
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    Sounds pretty good - and $400 is a good price. Rebarreling it to .25-06 is going to be difficult unless you can find a standard .473" bolt body to replace the magnum bolt body.
    kriggevær - skarpskytte, samler, jæger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kriggevaer View Post
    Sounds pretty good - and $400 is a good price. Rebarreling it to .25-06 is going to be difficult unless you can find a standard .473" bolt body to replace the magnum bolt body.
    Oops, I forgot about that belted case rim dia. I've only owned one belted mag in my life, a nice M98 338 Win mag conversion.
    Thanks for the feedback, I'm going to have to ruminate on the caliber.

  14. #14
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    sorry 1640 can be forced over extractor in to a push feed in an emergency....
    designed is off modified 96....

  15. #15
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    Thanks again you guys. I'm going to pass on the 9000 push feed. The plastic stock, the caliber, and the action type just make it a no go for me. I'm in the middle of four other projects as it is, (which isn't a bad thing.) I'm going to be patient and keep my eyes open for another 1640 in good shape in a caliber that would be enjoyable to shoot and that I don't have yet, like a 7x57, 6.5x55 or maybe even a 9.3x whatever, although I am a sucker for .358's of all kinds. My other two 1640's both came with badly split and cut down stocks that were really beyond repair. I have them both bedded in Bansner stocks, and they are excellent mountain rifles. I bought a partially inletted stock from Richard's stocks a few years back and it sits in a corner. Maybe one winter when I have nothing else to do, I will get it finished for one of the HVA's and turn it back into a "looker"
    I'm sure the 9000's are wonderful actions, but they seem to have departed from the "lightweight" philosophy that those beautiful little small ring 1600's have. Now a pre-Garcia Sako Vixen in a .223 would get my fingers reaching for the wallet, but that's a whole 'nuther story.

  16. #16
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    Actually, the 1900 is also a "small ring" action. The front receiver ring of the 1640 and 1900 are the same dimension (about 1.300").
    Coagula / Solve

    Baribal; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baribal

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baribal View Post
    Actually, the 1900 is also a "small ring" action. The front receiver ring of the 1640 and 1900 are the same dimension (about 1.300").
    So much to learn, so little time. It seems like there are lots of these rifles in Canada, but current laws prevent someone in the States from buying and importing them?

  18. #18
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    these actions have one of the best bolt to action vault like lock up in a gun i have ever seen.... hammer forged barrels bring out the accuracy and is legend with 1900 owners....
    one of the smoothes bolt i have owned....stocks fit me like a glove....
    C gustafs even better fitting stocks....the light weight 1900 are comparable to the 1640's....
    C G Swede's are light too!
    my first choice for hunting, target practice.....and THESE ARE sporters!

    many threads tell much more than this! <>< dk

    "own one you'll never give it up!"

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