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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default J Stevens Arms and tool Co.

    A friend of mine inherited a sxs exposed hammer shotgun marked J stevens Arms and Tool Chicopee Falls Mass. The gun is in beutiful condition. I have never found a gun harder to research so I turned to the best...you guys. The shotgun has no model number, patent date or any other markings except for the above mentioned manufacturer. As I said it's an exposed hammer side lock. on the splinter forend it has 1262 stamped twice, once on the steel and once on the wwod. On the water table it has 1262 stamped twice. On the plastic checkered butt plate it has a banner that say's STEVENS. There are no other markings, no proof marks...zilch! The gun locks up rock solid and has fluid steel barrels. I measured the chokes, right barrel is .712 which would be modified, the left barrel is .719 imp cyl. The barrel thickness at the muzzel is only .040, I have never seen barrels this thin before. The barrels are 26 3/4" long, it has a .375 mat rib, pistol grip, nice walnut and checkering. There's the slightest trace of case color hardening on the triggers and 50% of the browning left on the barrels. The exposed hammers are kind of cresent moon shaped with striker that sits on top of the cresent moon that turns up at almost 90 degrees. As I said the gun is as tight as the day it was made, the bore is bright and shiny. Is this gun safe to shoot light 1oz loads ( it's bored 2 3/4 12ga.) or is this a black powder gun. Any help on ID would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks, you guy's are the best,
    Philinchaos

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Oldsmar, FL (Tampa Bay)
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    Default

    Use a chamber guage to check the shell length. 2 3/4 shells easily fit in a 2 1/2 chamber and sizes weren't standardized until around 1930.

    Stevens is tough to research due to lack of serialization and records and because Stevens shotguns weren't snobbish enough to interest fanatic collectors despite . I'd guess 1262 isn't a serial number but a manufacturing number to keep parts matched. Fluid steel indicates smokeless but keep the pressures low, please.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default

    jjk 308,
    Thanks for your quick reply. When I said fluid steel i just ment it's not Damascus, it doesn't say fluid steel on it anywhere, I included everything that was on the shotgun in my original post. It does have visible horizonal lines running the length of the barrel, I don't know if this is just cosmetic or means something. I can't feel a lip like on modern shotguns but there's a light ring at 2 3/4. if there is not a prominent lip how does a bore gauge work? I have never used one. How do you post photos on this sight, maybe someone can identify it.
    Thanks again for your help,
    philinchaos

  4. #4
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    Dec 1969
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    Oldsmar, FL (Tampa Bay)
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    Default

    A bore guage is a dowel the diameter of the chamber with marks at the correct chamber lengths. It goes into the chamber, stops where the forcing cone starts so you can read the chamber length. Without it its hard to measure.

    You can upload pictures to http://photobucket.com/ and they will be automaticly resized to fit. click on the "share" under the picture then use the Image option on the Post reply to link to the photo.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    excellent guns good quality.....most used hard used up!.....
    hard to research....old sales catalogs from those time periods is how i have done in the past...

  6. #6
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    been sick post pictures....just maybe i can help?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default

    I took some pictures to see if anyone out there in gun land can identify this old J. Steven's shotgun. It appears two have a 3" chamber, the rings around the barrel barrel are 3" apart and there is a lip 3" inside the bore. What really has me puzzeled are the horizontal line running the entire length of the the barrel. Would it be safe to shoot 1oz field loads in this shotgun?
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  8. #8
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    Dec 1969
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    Honolulu,HI
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    484

    Default

    Looks like a 235, used to have one was a great piece, but like stated above, rode hard and put away wet. Didnt use anything more than #6 Shot. Sold it to a cowboy shooter thats still using it.
    "Hows Jesus Look To You Now Bob"

  9. #9
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    j stevens & tool co. 1886 incorporated .....same name till 1915.........

    i have no photos on these:
    model...250, 260, 270, 255, 265, all are hammer side lock models.......
    names mentioned where Riverside.....might be this.... then Springfield, Super value?

    start with these it may lead you to the photos? look at hammer shapes! good luck...... dk
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 11-20-2011 at 05:40 PM.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default

    All,
    Does anyone have some photo's of a 235? Also, does anyone know what the horozontal lines are?
    Tkanks,
    philinchaos

  11. #11
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    yes i agree a 235........... found more modle numbers pg 11 Modern Guns 7th edition, 1989 ......... just found it....
    hammers are the key!
    comes in 28, 30, 32, inch barrels...16 & 12 gauge....case harden frame, checkered walnut, pistol grip, made 1907-1928..........255 and 265 dropped around ww 1.....
    Last edited by DK PHILLIPS; 11-23-2011 at 11:44 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    My Own World (OHIO)
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    947

    Default

    I got a 235 with no finish left and it has similar lines on the barrel.
    If Guns Make People Kill, Then Pencils Misspell Words, Cars Make Poeple Drive Drunk, And Spoons And Forks Make People Fat !

    Self Defense Is The Most Basic Human Right.

  13. #13
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    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default

    Hey biggs1deer,
    Thanks for dropping in. The gun is tight as a drum. Is it safe to shoot light 1oz field loads?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    My Own World (OHIO)
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    947

    Default

    Mine is tight too. I got the gun from a relative and the barrel was split so we shortened it to 26" I was waiting to get the shotgun refinished and use it on silly rabbits but I can't find anyone locally to reblue it. If I remember correctly the barrel split was caused by either snow was in the barrel or he tried to deer hunt with it and the slug split the end of the barrel. I have not fired it yet, but for what its worth, im not going to shoot anything but lead shot standard loads because of its age.
    If Guns Make People Kill, Then Pencils Misspell Words, Cars Make Poeple Drive Drunk, And Spoons And Forks Make People Fat !

    Self Defense Is The Most Basic Human Right.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    25

    Default

    Hey biggs1deer,
    My shotgun is definetly not a 235. The 235 is a box lock, if you notice on the photos of my shotgun it's a sidelock. This is driving me nuts, I have never had such a hard time identifying a gun before. I have never seen a firearm with just the manufactures name and a serial number. Anyone else have any ideas?

  16. #16
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    my books photos conflict them selves.....still researching..

  17. #17

    Default model 255

    I happened to stumble across this thread.

    Here are some pics of a model 255 for reference


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    southern Illinois
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    98

    Default

    235's were marked 235. The early unmarked ones are hard go postitively identify. If I had realy good photos's I could probably identify it from the Stevens catalog reprints I have but not necessarily.

  19. #19
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    Mar 2013
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    Mountains of Colorado
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    Default

    I know this thread is old but I recently bought a model 250 and It looks a lot like what you have there. Mine is clearly marked on the bottom as "Model 250". I can post pictures if need be.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Goodyear Arizona
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    302

    Default

    My books shows three Steven hammer sidelocks that look identical to the posters gun, The 260,the 270 and the 280.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Eastern SC
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    Default

    J. Stevens Arms and Tool Comapny began producing double barrels in 1900, the first was the Model 250, a hammer sidelock. Other hammer sidlock models were 260, 270, 280, 255 and 265. The hammer sidelock models did not survive WWI.

    It should be noted thats J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company did supply both Twist and Damascus Steel barrels on hammer sidelock doubles in the period 1900-1915. I would not use modern ammunition in a Stevens hammer sidelock until it was determined positively not to be Twist or Damascus Steel. This can be accomplished by polishing a spot the size of a dime (under the forearm is a good place) and applying concentrated sulphuric acid. If it is Damascus or Twist steel, the pattern will appear after a short period of time, as the acid will etch the iron faster than the steel.

  22. #22
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    Mar 2010
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    Martinsville, Indiana
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    Default

    Gosh, that's a pretty shotgun... I have a terrible weakness for old side-by-sides, and the exposed hammers are just great. Thanks for the pics.

  23. #23
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    Apr 2013
    Location
    Broad Creek, MD
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    94

    Default

    Not 100% sure, but i just finished working on N.R. Davis & Sons double Barrel for a client. N. R Davis started in 1880 andmerged with Warner Arms in I think 1915, then they became Cresent Davis Arms, which became Stevens Arms and lastly was Savage Arms. They were located in Assonet, MA.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    1

    Default

    I hate to resurrect this old thread but I recently bought what I believe to be a Stevens Arms and Tool Co model 250. Like many old shotguns, mine has a broken stock. When I say broken, most all of the stock 4 inches behind the tang is missing. Does anyone know of any source I could go to that might have a pile of old parts? Maybe I'm just dreaming. Thanks for any help!

  25. #25
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    Dec 1969
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    You'll have to make a stock or have one made. Since you have the inletted part it should be possible for someone with a stick duplicator to cut one out.

    here's the first 5 off an internet search - no personal knowledge of them.

    http://gunstockduplicating.com/
    http://www.bosesguns.com/duplicating.html
    http://www.jerryjimersongunstocks.co....php?duplicate
    http://murraysgunstocks.com/GunstockDuplicating.php
    http://customstocksandsteel.com/Gun_...plication.html

    If I was doing it I'd have a 90% or better one cut out by the duplicator and finish it myself. All the expensive work is in the fitting and anyone with a book on stockmaking, a few inletting tools, a good steady hand and lots of patience can do it.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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