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  1. #1
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    Default my home made gas check maker

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ID:	510350here is a home made gas check maker I have been working with. I just machined my dies to make checks for my 357 molds. My 30 cal die is in the foreground.

  2. #2
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    What is your raw material?
    Geal ‘us dearg a suas!

    Member since Gunboards v1.0

  3. #3
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    I used stressproof as that was all I had laying around. I was concerned about wear but have already made up thousands. The sizes were all the same as when first machined. I was going to use some w1 drill rod but by the looks of it I will have two lifetimes of gas checks when the tool is too worn out to use.

  4. #4
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    Clue me in.....what is "stressproof"? Could you explain your process a bit better?
    Geal ‘us dearg a suas!

    Member since Gunboards v1.0

  5. #5
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    Aluminum, I believe. The castboolits website talks about making your own gas checks
    AK_MILSURP
    Benefactor Life Member, NRA
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    Anchorage, AK
    www.amga.net

    "Remember the Range day, And keep it holy. May the light of the Holy Tracer guide thy aim"

  6. #6
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    stress proof steel..fatigue proof. It's called different names in different areas. The gas checks themselves are formed out of aluminum sheeting .014 thick. Just look up freechex3 and you will find all the info you need.

  7. #7
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    process: push the sheeting in the slot of the die-pull handle of elcheapo arbor press down-check is blanked and formed in one operation and falls out the bottom. Push sheeting over to get to unpunched material and repeat. You can easily form 600 gas checks an hour..

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by arjacobson View Post
    process: push the sheeting in the slot of the die-pull handle of elcheapo arbor press down-check is blanked and formed in one operation and falls out the bottom. Push sheeting over to get to unpunched material and repeat. You can easily form 600 gas checks an hour..
    Given current price of gas checks, this method has much appeal!!

  9. #9
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    Dec 2009
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    Wild Wonderfull, WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by bws 1944 View Post
    Given current price of gas checks, this method has much appeal!!
    Yes it does but don't forget the details.
    Is it not true that a bullet should or has to have an undersized section (I would call a counter turn) on the bottom for the check to go on. The OP's .014" check is not too different than a commercial check in thickness and should work just fine on a standard checkable bullet but many people use aluminum soda cans to make checks out of. For those you would need a custom mould and you would for any other thinner than standard check because the check is crimped on the bullet by the sizer die.
    I do use checks on my super-sonic rifle bullets but not on the sub-sonic rifle loads or on any of my pistol loads so its not a big deal to me.
    Motor

  10. #10
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    These are basically a replacement for standard copper checks. If you use aluminum cans(and you can set up dies for that) you have to allow for that in the die design. I wanted to use cheap aluminum flashing that I buy at the local ACE hardware store. The last roll was 4"x50 foot long. It cost me right at $20.00. Copper checks usually run about this price for 1K. I can make ALOT more than 1k gaschecks for $20.00. Some people get used litho plate from their local newspaper for free. This usually runs about .010 thick and works great. BTW if you are looking for custom molds check out castboolits.com-They have many mold group buys going on all the time. In fact I ordered a real nice pointed 45 mold for bowling pins

  11. #11
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    You really need to measure your bullet to know what will work. A standard Hornady check was just a little too thin for my 160gr Lee which drops at .3130" to .3135" because I needed the bullet as big as possible I install the check with a .314" die. .314 minus twice the check thickness ended up as the same diameter of the step on my bullet I wanted to check. The simple solution for me was to bore the part of the mould the creates the check area to produce a .284" diameter step to put the check on before crimping.

    The point is measure your check fit diameter on the bullet. Measure your check material thickness and multiply it by 2 then add your fit diameter. If these add up to at least .002" over your bullet sizer die then your check will have a crimp. If it adds up to less than you won't.
    Motor

  12. #12
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    Or..... just bounce the base of your cast bullet against the flat on your bench vice or other flat chunk of steel a few times. It will marginally "bump up" the diameter of the gas check step. Then seat your gas checks as normal. SImple and effective.... wink wink




    Quote Originally Posted by Motor View Post
    You really need to measure your bullet to know what will work. A standard Hornady check was just a little too thin for my 160gr Lee which drops at .3130" to .3135" because I needed the bullet as big as possible I install the check with a .314" die. .314 minus twice the check thickness ended up as the same diameter of the step on my bullet I wanted to check. The simple solution for me was to bore the part of the mould the creates the check area to produce a .284" diameter step to put the check on before crimping.

    The point is measure your check fit diameter on the bullet. Measure your check material thickness and multiply it by 2 then add your fit diameter. If these add up to at least .002" over your bullet sizer die then your check will have a crimp. If it adds up to less than you won't.
    Motor
    AK_MILSURP
    Benefactor Life Member, NRA
    Life Member, Alaska Gun Collectors Association
    Life member, VFW
    Anchorage, AK
    www.amga.net

    "Remember the Range day, And keep it holy. May the light of the Holy Tracer guide thy aim"

  13. #13
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    Good info guys. I built this die to fit my lee 312-155 2r mold. The other set of dies was made for a lee .357 swc mold. I use lees cheap sizers and they crimp on very nice. I have never had a real problem with loose checks as these were purpose built for each mold. I have heard of guys glueing checks on but i have never done it myself. You can play around with material thickness and inner spud diameter to gain or lose a few thou.

  14. #14
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    Good work ! Making your own checks are well worth the time I've been using them in 30 cal for a while now and bought a original freechex maker when they first came out and have it just about worn out! I've used alum,copper and brass all work very well and are everybit as accurate as commercial make checks . I've also started using the plainbase checks and found they work just as well even at full power pressure and speeds in my 35 rem. What's nice about the PB chex is that i have found that the thinner and free .004 can alum.actually works better and is easier to swage on the base especially using the lee push through sizer ! If PB 30 cal moulds were more common I would only use them instead of the standard chex.again nice work I so wish I had the equipment to make my own!
    If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

    LETS GO PENS !!!!!!!!!!!!!

  15. #15
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    I use the olive oil 3 liter cans for my material with the freechex gas check maker. It works great and measures a little over .010 thickness. Ray

  16. #16
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    Thats a great idea! I am thinking about visiting the local newspaper to see if they have used aluminum sheeting from the printing press process. Linograph aluminum I think it's called?? Anyway that is supposed to run about .010 too. Worth a shot.

  17. #17
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    Not at all gas-check related, but your Avitar is reminiscent of the Ambush Mode my old feral cat Hobbes would assume whenever I came home with groceries.

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    Anyone passing "The Bag" was subject to a serious pouncing on from a 23# wild-born Cat.
    "Hey Look! We've got Guns ... and We've got Snacks!"
    - Cdr. Samuel "Sam" Axe, USN, (ret) -

  18. #18
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    that is a cute cat!

  19. #19
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    I tried the litho plate before also but was a hair too thin what I did was laminate it with can material and bingo right at .014 ! I also did this with brass sheet that was too thin and worked very well I don't know if laminated material will work in a progressive chex maker like yours I was using the first gen. Freechex where you punch the blanks with a hole cutter
    If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

    LETS GO PENS !!!!!!!!!!!!!

  20. #20

    Default

    Do you have any plans or drawings for your checkmaker? If you do could you share those? I understand the concept of punching the checks out, but since these are essentially drawn and sheared, are you using a spring loaded base plate, or am I over-thinking this? Thanks for the pix.

  21. #21
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    Dec 1969
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    I plonked down the $100, got the FreeCheckIII and never looked back. I make all my 30 cal
    checks and am please with economy and results and not finding source of checks sold out and
    having none. The tool paid for itself inside 6 months of shooting.

    OP has made a clone of the same tool I use. Congrats to him for skills to do that !!!

    Motor: I should send you some checks, you are going to like the results !

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