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Thread: 22 rim fire

  1. #1
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    Default 22 rim fire

    I have had this "ball" 22 rim fire for a long time and forgot if it is military or for a special firearm ?

  2. #2
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    Looks like a standard M24. US military.

    ray

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    That first pic is weirdly misleading.

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    The US military ordered from Remington, 22 long rifle ammunition to be used in survival handguns during WWII. Since the Hauge Convention outlawed lead bullets, the US government ordered 22 Long Rifle ammo with a copper jacket over the lead bullet. These were used into Vietnam. While these are not rare they are uncommon and should not be shot. I have been a collector of cartridges for decades and have a complete unopened box of these but I dont have a single round.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 30-30remchester View Post
    The US military ordered from Remington, 22 long rifle ammunition to be used in survival handguns during WWII. Since the Hauge Convention outlawed lead bullets, the US government ordered 22 Long Rifle ammo with a copper jacket over the lead bullet. These were used into Vietnam. While these are not rare they are uncommon and should not be shot. I have been a collector of cartridges for decades and have a complete unopened box of these but I dont have a single round.
    That is Hague Convention, and while one of them specifically outlaws glass-filled projectiles, poison and barbed lances, lead bullets are not prohibitted per se, the 1899 (First Hague Cnvention) Convention did prohibit the Use of Bullets Which Expand or Flatten Easily in the Human Body (essentially, hollow points - Dum-Dums or the British "Man-Stoppers" for the 455). Regular .22 woyuld be OK, though an fmj might make things safer for the user.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    I don't think the USA signed off on the Conventions. We generally honor the restrictions out of respect for soldiers on the other side or (more importantly) to keep our guys from being hung if they are captured with any sort of "inhumane" ammunition on them.

    In the 1990s, our JAG ruled that hollow point bullets do not violate any of the conventions but many field commanders would not allow their troops to use them. It's a lot easier to be sitting behind a desk in Washington than being caught with HP ammo in your rifle.

    Ray

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Meketa View Post
    I don't think the USA signed off on the Conventions. We generally honor the restrictions out of respect for soldiers on the other side or (more importantly) to keep our guys from being hung if they are captured with any sort of "inhumane" ammunition on them.

    In the 1990s, our JAG ruled that hollow point bullets do not violate any of the conventions but many field commanders would not allow their troops to use them. It's a lot easier to be sitting behind a desk in Washington than being caught with HP ammo in your rifle.

    Ray
    No, we never adopted the St. Petrsburg/Hague/Geneva Conventions dealing with permissible weaponry (as opposed to the GCs on treatment of POWs and civilians caught in war zones, treatment of refugees and DPs and such which we did adopt) but as a matter of policy mostly adhere to them AND to some of the commonly accpted but erroneous beliefs about them.

    That opinion on hollow-points (actually, mainly aimed whether open-point match bullets are legal for snipers to use) is extremely well-researched and written. By a (at that time) USMC reserve colonel serving in SecDef's office as a civilian. his name is Hayes Parks, and he is a veteran of Vietnam (as a rifle platoon leader - all Misguided Children are rifelment firt, something else later), graduate of Baylor Law School, and as a Regular (he resigend that and transferred to reserves when he was wanted ss a special assistant to the Amry TJAG in 1979) JAG officer. He was, as a Major, an instructor at the JAG School at Charlottesville in 1974. I had him, brilliant man and then and since one of the few genuine experts on what is and isn't permissible behavior (including authorized weaponry) under the Customary Laws of War and the statutory Laws of War as adopted by the various Conventions and Treaties. I feel fortunate to have had him as a teacher and honored to know him. If he says something on that subject, you can trust it completely as far as the legal grounds are stated.



    See http://www.apcml.org/latest_news/pus...hays_parks.doc for a fuller biography
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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