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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    242

    Default mauser 71/84 regimental markings and so

    mauser fans
    have a mauser in collection thats marked on the buttplate heel '24.R.E 4.170. ???????
    the nock or knox form mentions the arsenal of " spandau under crown ", FW under crown en several other inspection marks ( 4 of them) the number 11( caliber), serial is 6195 , year of production 1887 on receiver
    please advise
    I ' m not a mauser expert
    greatings from over the pond
    jarmann

  2. #2
    Wapruf2's Avatar
    Wapruf2 is offline Diamond Member with Oak Leaves and Swords
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    1,553

    Default

    Is the R in script (or italic)?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    242

    Default

    dear sir
    don't now what means script or italic ,but the letters are just like I ptinted them in my text
    can this help you
    greetings from a overponder
    jarmann

  4. #4

    Default

    The script or italic version of a letter can be said to be slanted or more elaborate in appearance. If printed in italic script, the letter "R" will represent a Reserve regiment rather than the Regulars or 1st line troops. R = Regulars, R = Reserves.

    Let's assume that the letter "R" is not italic. The marking "24.R.E 4.170." translates as "Weapon #170, of the 4th Company of the Ersatz (Replacement) Bataillon, of the 24th Infantry Regiment". Reserve regiments did not usually have an Ersatz Bataillon, the troops in an Ersatz unit were new troops that had been through basic training and were moved to replace troops that had reached the end of their regular service and were going to be stepping down to a reserve regiment for the next phase of their required service in the German Army. This marking representing an Ersatz Bataillon is pre-WW1.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    242

    Default

    dear mr tp
    thank you for your explanation on the matter
    the rifle I mentioned is brand new ,has far as I can see and I have dimanteled the piece till the last scew ,it is new and never fired in my opinion , that is the reason of my question is this possible ? the woodwork is virgin aswell as all parts are bright blued and /or shiny white ,can you check on the serial number ????
    I will be very grateful for you expertise

    greetings from flanders over the pond
    jarmann


    i

  6. #6

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    Jarmann, I am glad to have been helpful. As far as new? Yes, it is possible. There are a number of "like new" condition Gew71/84s in the US that were (I think) imported back in the 1950s - 1960s. Where they came from I am not certain but I have heard that they were found in South America. Keep in mind that your rifle was at least issued as is shown by the regimental marking but it was obviously well cared for. The discipline in the German army was at a very high level and the soldier was responsible for it's care. It would not have gone well for him if the issued rifle came back with unnecessary damage. Also, being made in 1887 and since it was marked to an Ersatz Bataillon, it was very likely on issue only for a short time before the 24th Regiment received it's issue of the new Gew88. After that it sat in careful storage until sold as surplus to Germany's needs, which probably happened before WW1.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    331

    Default

    jarmann- The guys here on the Board are really very good at deciphering Regimental marks. Helped me out several times.

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