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  1. #1

    Default BSA CF2/Monarch/Majestic Rifles

    Anybody got any ideas on how good or bad they are? I think they're push feed, Made in England, good barrels.

  2. #2
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    Default Nice BSA Sporting Rifles

    BSA is of course Birmingham Small Arms of England. The first of the modern line of BSA rifles came to the States in the mid nineteen fifties. There is some confusion as to the actual name of this model but I have seen it described as either the Royal or the Hunter model. These rifles were basically of the mauser pattern incorporating the long mauser extractor. They were fine quality guns, but a bit expensive to produce. By the late fifties, these rifles had given way to the BSA Majestic series. This model incorporated the push feed system that was by then becoming prevalent in the States. It also set the basic pattern for the subsequent BSA models. The next successor model was the Monarch which included some simplifications. Further while both the Royal and the Monarch series had an integral receiver scope base dovetail (mated to Parker Hale mounts), the Monarch dispensed with it. The monarch ‘ruled’ until perhaps the late nineteen sixties at which time the last of these nice BSA rifles reached the American shores in the form of the CF2 model. In some technical action details it was a throwback to the Majestic model though still excluding the integral dovetail receiver pattern. The Majestic and CF2 are considered just a bit more desirable than the Monarch action although the styling of some of the CF2 stocks was a bit radical and less than popular. The good about all these series was that they were made ‘the old fashioned way’, (much like the pre-64 Winchester model 70) from solid steel billets for receiver and bolt, which involved labor intensive machining.
    The Royal rifles had come in three action lengths, with the largest only accommodating the 30-06 class cartridges. The several later models were apparently offered in only the two longer lengths which eventually included two short magnum chamberings. I own several of the Royal series and find these rifles quite nice. (Photos of one in 243 Win. below) I have owned a Majestic with a comparable personal evaluation. The now defunct firm of Herter’s marketed both the later BSA push feed actions (as I recall the Majestic series) and complete rifles which they assembled. These were not up to the BSA standards in fit/finish though apparently still quite functional.
    In speaking particularly of the latter two models, I need to attribute my knowledge, actually recollections here, to Frank DeHasse’s book “Bolt Action Rifles”. There a detailed description of all four models can be found along with his expert evaluations.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails R78-4.jpg   R78-3.jpg  

  3. #3

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    Thanks I just bought a CF2 in 6.5x55

  4. #4
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    I believe that you have acquired an uncommon rifle in what I assume to be a rare chambering. Sounds like a great find! Photos would be appreciated should you have time.

  5. #5

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    Will do when it arrives. The 6.5x55 was sold in North America under the CF2 model exported to here.

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    isrka...summed it up quiet nicely.....if i recall, but don't quote me..64 or 67 separate machine steps just to finish the monarch receiver? i read once that's why they went to cf2 types
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  7. #7

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    How many machining steps did they cut down for the CF2?

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    never read that....but it was the cost saving measure to replace time on task expense machining steps....didn't save the company against its total composition changing the cost of manufacture.......i didn't buy the CF2's....
    sold my others BSA's in hope to get a Imperial....never found another....
    switched to the more accurate off the bench with modern style vault like lock up and strength Huskquvarna 1900 actions...( and older 1640 actions are very strong too)....never looked back....

    if i see an Imperial 7X57...308, 06....I'LL....try again!
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  9. #9

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    Are the BSA actions not strong? They are Mauser inspired a little no? What were the design influences on the BSA line? Originally they were Mauser, but when they became push feed, they resembled the Sako Finnbear.

  10. #10
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    dak0ta, Not an answer per se, but perhaps the two best sources of information you seek re your rifle are likely: 1) From the book that I attributed in my above post. It contains a great amount of of information about a variety of centerfire bolt action rifles including the postwar BSA models. Perhaps try Inter-Library loan to obtain it. 2) A BSA expert under the aka "Brithunter" who could probably well answer your questions. He is to be found often at: http://thehunterslife.com/forums/for...=48&order=desc. This forum deals specifically with BSA, Parker hale, etc.
    I reiterate my own opinion that you have acquired a very nice quality rifle.

  11. #11

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    Hi yes, I have been in touch with BritHunter and he has impressed me with his knowledge on BSA and PH rifles. The CF2 is very similar to Sako rifles of the era (ie. Finnbear). Very smooth, strong action. Quality bluing, hammer forged barrel, accurate, heavy, built to last rifles that sell cheaper than the Sakos.

  12. #12

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    The ejector is a little weak spitting out cartridges (not empty cases), is that normal? I'm used to the fixed ejector on Mausers throwing them out a few feet. Otherwise, other questions are, is the diamond on the grip cap supposed to be white? Mine's black. Also, there are some handling marks and dings here and there, a little chip on the rosewood fore-end cap on the right side. The bolt cycles very smoothly and feeds fine. Rifle is very well balanced for an 8lb gun! Trigger.. wow.. amazing! So light it's incredible, better than my Savage Accu-Trigger. The safety is positive and easy to use. Magazine release functions too.

    There's a lot of grease in this gun and some dirt and grime. I'm not sure about the history of this gun, whether it was used and stored away or what. But the mag plate has lots of grease as well as the mag well. Bore is excellent!
    Last edited by dak0ta; 05-11-2012 at 01:14 AM.

  13. #13
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    I lack expertise to answer most of your question. Your description supports my view of the quality of these rifles. There are obviously some issues with the stock and the bottom metal finish. The latter is more often than not an issue to some degree on these rifles with alloy. Some of the earlier rifles employed steel bottom metal with a much more durable traditional blued finish. The action is quality and the chambering is the jewel in my estimation. I think that you have a very nice rifle all in all. I would have no regrets in owning such a piece. Thanks for the kindness of following through with the photos and... congratulations!
    My take.

  14. #14

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    Thanks iskra,

    I've already started cleaning her up. Degreasing and getting the gunk out. Going to let my gunsmith show me how to disassemble the bolt and he's going to refinish the bottom metal.

    I'm going to strip the stock, iron out the dents, use Alkanet Root Oil to highlight the walnut grain, BLO, and then paste wax. Hopefully she'll turn out very nice that way

    I need to source out the Williams guide rear sight slider and blade. And hopefully a front sight hood

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    never saw a 6 x 55...Brit...excellent...WILL REPAIR CLEAN UP NICELY...
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  16. #16

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    FYI for those that own a BSA CF2. I was at my local gunsmith and he showed me how to take the bolt down. It's not too difficult.

    1) Turn the bolt shroud clockwise so it sits on the top of the bolt body, not in the notches. Do not over turn it or else you'll get stuck, just enough so it sits out of the 'cocked' groove. This will align the holes in the bolt shroud to the holes in the cocking piece of the firing pin assembly.

    2) Insert a thin punch through both holes and pull up and unscrew the assembly from the bolt body. Remove punch and bolt shroud will separate from firing pin assembly.

    3) Cocking indicator can be taken out of bolt shroud, careful as it is spring loaded.

    4) To remove firing pin from from spring/assembly, compress the firing pin spring, and slide the firing pin off. It is secured by a notch that allows it to slide into a mating surface on the spring guide. If you are familiar with the Swiss K31 rifles, it is the same concept.

    5) Completely disassembled bolt. Reverse these steps to reassemble.

    Hope that helps!

  17. #17

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    Tonight I put on the first coat of Alkanet root oil. Just enough for it to sit and absorb, then rubbed it in and then wiped excess off. She's dried off now. Coat 2 tomorrow. The oil really enhances the grain and also blends the scratches and blemishes. Does Red oil work on other woods besides walnut like birch and beech? Also the burnishing of wood gives a really nice sheen that reflects.

    Before and After (so far)












  18. #18

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    After 7 coats of mixed BLO/alkanet root oil. Got that English red walnut colour I wanted.







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    after i got to your last step i would do the following!
    get some blue jean material cut into 4 in long strips....shoe shining motion take the last dry coat all the way down...
    then apply Johnson's bowling alley wax then use the same material shoes shine the whole stock....the "even sheen" will be thought out the total length of your WATER RESISTANT stock...
    very old... method....i have used on more guns that i can remember....even two BSA's

    rose wood is the hardest to fill all the rosewood pores takes special attention, correct humidity, dust free invironment and much luck.....it looks very good nice work! <><
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

  20. #20

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    I'm very happy with the stock, I didn't sand so the recoil pad mated up well with the wood.


    It looks way better than it used to, and it's a nice oil finish (7 coats BLO/Alkanet Root) with a coat of paste wax on top. It's smooth. It still shows some of the character marks of its age through the scratches, dings etc., but I like that aspect too.


    I put on a leather sling which is from Spain (Corzo). I think it matches the tone quite well. Swivels are Blackhawk 1'' Lok-Down swivels made in USA.


    Metalwork should be added shortly, and I have sourced out Williams guide sights to complete the look.


    Anyways obligatory photos before and after:


    Before:






    After:













  21. #21

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    She's all done!













  22. #22
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    A quality rifle, great chambering, effective efforts = a very nice piece of which you can be proud. Congratulations, work well done!
    Iskra

  23. #23

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    Thanks iskra!

    Only problem is I need a front sight hood and the plunger is a little weak. It ejects empty cases if I pull on the bolt fast, but is weak if it's done slowly. I'm not sure how to get at the plunger. I think it's held in by a roll pin on the left lucking lug, but not sure what to do exactly.

  24. #24
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    Well I tried to reply but for some reason it all locked up on me had to re-start the puter........................... Doh!

    Well I reconise the photos but didn't reconise the handle dak0ta................................... sorry about that.

    The CF2 came about due to the request for a rifle action from Herters in America the U9. This BSA made for them in Five action lengths. That was in the mid 1960's when BSA were still making the 1s Pattern Monarch. The second pattern monarch without the integral dovetails came out early 1968 according to Knibbs book. The CF2 came into production in 1972. It seems the CF2 was also the first of the BSA rifles to use hammer forged barrels.

    Oh yes BSA made 1796 rifles in 6.5x55 which is a stark contrast to the 389 they made in 7x57. This is my own 7x57 CF2:-



    and my CF2 Stutzen:-



    In 270 winchester

    This si the CF2 instruction leaflet:-





    Hope that is of some use.

  25. #25
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    nice postings. Would anyone have any information on the Royal BSA 7x57 medium rifle - trigger specifically? I have one where the weight adjustment isn't working - stays at 6lbs regardless of set screw position.

    Regards,

    Joe

  26. #26
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    First Tikka, congratulations on a very fine BSA rifle. In my opinion these long mauser pattern extractor Royal models are the best of a fine genre.
    Perhaps this posting will provide the results you desire. If not, two suggestions:
    First, that you should probably start your request as a new thread rather than tagging on an old one. It would likely get more attention.
    Second, an occasional Senior contributor "Brithunter", who commented above within this thread, probably could authoritatively answer your question. You might consider sending him a 'PM" (private message) restating the content your request for help. He may also be available through other channels by Goggling his moniker as shown here.

  27. #27
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    how good does it group?
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

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    Hey dak0ta! I was wondering if you succeded in getting your plunger to work as it should again? Having the same issue with my BSA CF2 222 Rem. It won´t eject empty cases but ejects "loaded" cases just fine.
    Quote Originally Posted by dak0ta View Post
    Thanks iskra!

    Only problem is I need a front sight hood and the plunger is a little weak. It ejects empty cases if I pull on the bolt fast, but is weak if it's done slowly. I'm not sure how to get at the plunger. I think it's held in by a roll pin on the left lucking lug, but not sure what to do exactly.

  29. #29
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    I liked the Imperials, majestic, monarchs....average 1 1/2 to two inch groups..
    hunting accuracy is all I could expect...tweaking the bedding....in the many I had.
    liked the double feed ramps, older stock styles....64 machined steps in making the receiver.....
    CF Models sealed the faith...not catching us older BSA guys....
    I change to sleeker, stronger, much more accurate Husqvarna / Carl Gustafs....
    but just recently I picked up a BSA older model with bersa wrong cal. 270 or I would have been greatly tempted once again... <>< dk
    GOD<><SAVE THE CONSTITUTION / STATES RIGHTS><>NRA

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