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  1. #1
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    Default Custom Mosin-Nagant target rifle is completed!

    This rifle started life as a 1939 Tula M91/30 Mosin-Nagant. The barreled receiver was purchased from RGUNs (makes me feel like less of a Bubba knowing it wasnít a complete rifle before going through this project) and I snagged one of the Czech UK-59 LMG barrels that TGI was selling a while back. Iím not a smithy, but I know someone who is and he's a member here - thanks, spitfire-er! A professional job is always preferred to some hacksawed garage job. The barrel was floated, shaped (to remove much of the UK-59 rear sight dovetail), and tapered towards the muzzle end a bit to better match the YHM QD flash hider. (I plan to use my Phantom suppressor with this one, too!) The barrel also timed perfectly so most of the area with the unneeded dovetail is actually under the wood line. Nice.

    I bought a Timney Mosin Nagant trigger (4.5 lbs.); Rock Solid mount, aluminum pillars, and hex-head action bolts; had the bolt polished inside and out, handle swept back, and personalized by Max Shepherd; and bought a nice laminated target stock from the shop owner. Spitfire_er completed all the inletting, fitting, and bedding; I completed the final stock finishing on my own using Behlenís Mahogany Solar-Lux NGR dye and Behrís #600 tung oil finish. I wanted to have the metal blued, but the different types of metal involved may not have allowed for a uniform result Ė so I went with a nice satiny dark grey/black parkerizing job instead.

    The rifle is topped off with a Leupold VX-3 long range target rifle scope (30mm tube, 6.5-20x 50mm side focus) with their Varmint Hunters Reticle and a set of their medium 30mm QRW rings. (May have been able to go with the low ringsÖ but these work.) And, finally, I installed a Harris S-LM bipod and Alpha-Bravo bipod lock to make this rifle range-ready.

    I'm absolutely pleased with the results. The real test will be out on the range, of course, but I've no reason to expect that this rifle will be anything other than a great shooter and a tack driver. I'll post pics and a report once I've had the chance to put it through its paces.

    I've posted some pics below - additional shots and some bigger pics are here:

    http://public.fotki.com/ptrthgr8/soviet/targetrifle/

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~








    Here's a shot of the customized bolt. The name was stamped in the same orientation as the original Soviet S/N. I would have preferred that it be stamped upside down so it would have been upside right with the bolt closed... but it's still pretty cool to have your name on a rifle. Even if it is upside down.
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  2. #2
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    Nice job! I like the grain in the stock and the swept handle. More importantly, how does it shoot?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by chw2021 View Post
    Nice job! I like the grain in the stock and the swept handle. More importantly, how does it shoot?
    Dunno yet. That's why I wrote "I'll post pics and a report once I've had the chance to put it through its paces." :D

    I'm eager to find out, too!

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  4. #4
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    i had no luck with that bipod. my rifle is equipt with a directional muzzle brake( it pushed down)....the height of the pipod on lo, puts the muzzle above your shoulder and the rifle wants to kick up..and unsettle from the shoulder. i went to a br short bipod( have not shot it yet).

    nice looking rifle...get some sierra 174 match kings through it...

    mike in co

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar10ar15man View Post
    i had no luck with that bipod. my rifle is equipt with a directional muzzle brake( it pushed down)....the height of the pipod on lo, puts the muzzle above your shoulder and the rifle wants to kick up..and unsettle from the shoulder. i went to a br short bipod( have not shot it yet).

    nice looking rifle...get some sierra 174 match kings through it...

    mike in co
    What kind of rifle were you shooting? The one above has got to weigh somewhere around 15lbs. (I'll have to weigh it to make sure, I suppose.) Anyhoo, it's a heavy sucker, so I'm not really worried about recoil at all. I guess I'll see what happens.

    I've got some 168gr. Sierra MatchKings and some 200gr. Lapua D166 projos I plan to test with first. I've done some reloading for some of my Finnish Mosins, so I've got lots of Lapua 7.62x53R brass on hand, too. This one ought to be able to outshoot all of them.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  6. #6
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    Looking good! Of course, the proof is in the shooting ...
    A few suggestions for you ...

    Bi-pod: There is considerable play in the Harris style bi-pod. They can squirm around in the legs even if the mount stays secure, which it often does not.
    http://stores.versapod.com/-strse-Cl...Categories.bok
    The Versapod bi-pod is a superior design. Much sturdier and once locked down tight, (I crank the knobs down with pliers) there is no movement in the legs unless you want pan and tilt by loosening it up. There are various adapter(s) to attach to the stock. The bi-pod is a spigot mount, making it a quick disconnect system. The spigot can be securely attached to the stock. I personally prefer the rail mount adapter that securely clamps onto a 1" Picatinny rail bolted onto the stock. If you want to take the spigot mount off completely, hunting or other use without bi-pod, just loosen the clamp on the rail and slide it off.
    Mounting screws directly into the wood of the stock is not secure. The stress of use will cause the screws to loosen and even chew out the wood eventually. Carve out a "block" in the wood for the bi-pod mount and fill it with Devcon 10110 Steel Epoxy. You can drill and tap the Devcon plug to utilize bolts instead of wood screws. Attach the rail to the block, apply a little blue loktite and torque down. The rail will never work loose. The spigot will lock onto the rail and not work loose. The bi-pod will lock down on the spigot and not work loose. I prefer the model with 4" short legs on the bench.

    Add an anti-cant bubble level on the scope.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/689...ice-30mm-matte
    CANTING side to side can have very adverse effects on your sighting causing much difficulty in dialing in a correct zero. There is a good article on this I don't have the link to right now that explains this in great detail.Objective is to have your cross hairs perfectly level to the level of the receiver (mated to the gun by placing a bubble level across the receiver and rotating the scope until the cross hairs match level)
    On the bench, set up the bi-pod with the tilt adjustment of the VersaPod and obtain a perfect level with the anti-cant bubble level on the scope then lock it down tight. This keeps the rifle perfectly level on the bench and eliminates canting.

    Add a MONOPOD to the rear:
    http://www.accu-shot.com/catalog/?cP...93f71453d10c32
    I like these so much, I have put them on several guns!
    Eliminate the rile moving up and down (elevation) by creating a firm tripod with the monopod as the third leg!
    Elevation is "dialed in" by screwing the knob on the monopod up and down and then lightly pulling it to shoulder grasping the knob. This keeps your non-shooting hand off the forestock and allows very precise up and down adjustments. The rifle may "hop" off target when shot but will remain "on" for elevation when you swing it back on target.
    This is a must have for bench precision shooting! It can be unscrewed and detached easily.

    Add a mercury tube!
    http://www.mercuryrecoil.com/
    This is another must have item! I have installed these in several shooters and swear by them!
    A 16oz 3/4" tube soaks up a good 40% of felt recoil. Additional weight in the tail end of the stock actually improves overall balance. My custom M44 shoulders much better with the weight in the rear and makes it easier to keep the sights on target from the standing position. On a bench, it helps control hop. Installing is easy with a solid wood stock. Using a drill guide jig, screw the jig onto the butt of the stock, obtain the correct angle and drill a 5.5" deep 3/4" hole. The tube slides in, fits snug, and won't come loose. There is a threaded end for a bolt to pull it out if needed.

    Bump up your recoil pad:
    A 1" Limb Saver (sand to fit, small) soaks up a lot more recoil. Softer rubber makes it more comfortable to shoulder and shoot.
    Between the mercury tube and the recoil pad, recoil is reduced enough to "bare shoulder" over a hundred rounds a session with no discomfort at all and no need for a shoulder pad!

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by db2044 View Post
    Bump up your recoil pad:
    A 1" Limb Saver (sand to fit, small) soaks up a lot more recoil. Softer rubber makes it more comfortable to shoulder and shoot.
    Between the mercury tube and the recoil pad, recoil is reduced enough to "bare shoulder" over a hundred rounds a session with no discomfort at all and no need for a shoulder pad!
    I'm not too concerned about recoil, to be honest. When I normally take a Mosin out shooting (Finns, Russian etc.) we go through a couple of hundred rounds through each one easy. With steel buttplates. And nothing thicker than a fleece. So I already think this particular rifle - given it's massive weight compared to the others - will have noticeably lighter felt recoil. The pad that's one there is gravy.

    But good info on the bipod. The Alpha-Bravo locking handle seems to be pretty solid, but I do know that doesn't mean it will hold up well under recoil. I'll definitely keep that in mind.

    Thanks!

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  8. #8
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    do a search for the
    91/12 sniper....i
    'll bump it to the top....
    is that bbl a 308 or ????
    i assume those were good bbl as far aas bore and lands..i was not around here when they were available....

    mike in co

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar10ar15man View Post
    do a search for the
    91/12 sniper....i
    'll bump it to the top....
    is that bbl a 308 or ????
    i assume those were good bbl as far aas bore and lands..i was not around here when they were available....

    mike in co
    The UK-59 was a Czech LMG chambered in 7.62x54R. TGI had the barrels threaded for the Mosin action - still chambered in 54R. The bore on this one is basically brand new.
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  10. #10
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    Absolutely a great job ... I love it .

  11. #11
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    The stock turned out really nice and the metal finish ended up matching the scope nicely! The stock turned out better than I could have expected. I think the entire rifle turned out nicer than mine!

    Just to add a couple things about the barrel, it did time out good as far as the groove for the sight, which was a big relief for me. If you look at the photos close too you can see we added a collar ahead of the receiver fitted tight to the barrel to better torque the barrel to the action. In my opinion the original barrels as is, do not allow sufficient enough shoulder for my liking. I did something similar on my rifle. The extractor groove on the barrel also needed to be modified to function properly.


    Anyways, thanks Greg for letting me build this rifle for you. It has to be the best looking mosin I have seen!
    Looking for 6.5-280 RCBS 30 degree improved dies.

  12. #12
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    That is one super nice job! I hope she shoots like she looks! Excellent work.
    Stand and Fight !

  13. #13
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    I have built 7 UK-59 barreled customs. The bore is 100% new and .311 diameter. One of my friends on socamo.com tried the Lapua D166 and found they advertize them at .311 but measure up as .3095 and he had poor results because of loose fit in the bore. He shoots a UK-59 Mosin too. Devil Dog competes in the F Class with his gun and scores well, makes the guys with the Sakos and Remingtons, and Savage come look to see what he's shooting. ARman has it right, Sierra match king at .311 174 gr. are the best for reloading. I shoot 174 SMK over 54 gr of IMR4350 and have great results.

  14. #14
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    As I wrote earlier I've built 7 UK-59 Mosins, mine being the first. I was shooting surplus thru it and had a lot of split case shoulders. I tore it down and checked the chamber to find it was about .020 to deep. I cut the face of the chamber so the case fit right in the chamber. I had to do the same on the next 6, not all being the same amount of cut, but all were to deep. You have to remember this is a machine gun barrel and once a round was fired out on the ground it went. Also it had to accept ammo from different countries. As long as the case ejected properly who cares if it was junk. But here we are shooting brass we want to reload. Check your brass cases for bulges and anything that looks funny. One of my friends on socamo.com had to re chamber his as the cases were totally junk after firing. One other thing, the bore of the UK-59 is chrome, you need a carbide throat cutter and a carbide reamer. I partnered up with my friend and bought them. In carbide they were almost 400.00 dollars.Click image for larger version. 

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  15. #15
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    Good looking rifle! Looking forward to a Range report.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by spitfire_er View Post
    Anyways, thanks Greg for letting me build this rifle for you. It has to be the best looking mosin I have seen!
    No need to thank *me*, man. I was going to thank *you*.

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  17. #17
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    Beautiful rifle!

  18. #18
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    I think it looks great. If you don't mind me asking how much does a build like this cost?
    Patrick Kelley jr

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosin Nagant 91/30 View Post
    I think it looks great. If you don't mind me asking how much does a build like this cost?
    The barreled receiver, UK-59 barrel, Timney trigger, bolt modification/polishing, unfinished stock, scope mount, hex head receiver bolts, and aluminum receiver bolt pillars ran just under $500 total. The labor (I think he spent 23 hours or so in total labor) ran $500. Metal finishing, other materials, and tool use from the shop cost another $300. So, the rifle itself all total cost me just under $1300. I didn't include the scope and the rings in that cost since that part is really a matter of personal preference. I also didn't include the cost of the stock finishing since it was my labor and materials (that I had on hand already).

    ~$1300 for a custom-built target rifle seems like a pretty good deal to me. There's not another one like it on the planet and it fits well with the Mosin Nagant collection. And it's not even the most expensive Mosin-Nagant in the collection.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptrthgr8 View Post
    The barreled receiver, UK-59 barrel, Timney trigger, bolt modification/polishing, unfinished stock, scope mount, hex head receiver bolts, and aluminum receiver bolt pillars ran just under $500 total. The labor (I think he spent 23 hours or so in total labor) ran $500. Metal finishing, other materials, and tool use from the shop cost another $300. So, the rifle itself all total cost me just under $1300. I didn't include the scope and the rings in that cost since that part is really a matter of personal preference. I also didn't include the cost of the stock finishing since it was my labor and materials (that I had on hand already).

    ~$1300 for a custom-built target rifle seems like a pretty good deal to me. There's not another one like it on the planet and it fits well with the Mosin Nagant collection. And it's not even the most expensive Mosin-Nagant in the collection.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    Yes, that is a decent deal. IF it shoots they way you want it to (say .75-1.25 MOA out to 500 meters).
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Yes, that is a decent deal. IF it shoots they way you want it to (say .75-1.25 MOA out to 500 meters).
    Agreed. Even if there was no cost involved I'd want a target rifle to be capable of target rifle-quality groups at whatever range. But I'm also a Mosin Nagant collector, so I like having this rifle in the collection as a unique/one-of-a-kind specimen, too. My Czech VZ54 is pretty rare, but this target rifle is even more rare.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptrthgr8 View Post
    Agreed. Even if there was no cost involved I'd want a target rifle to be capable of target rifle-quality groups at whatever range. But I'm also a Mosin Nagant collector, so I like having this rifle in the collection as a unique/one-of-a-kind specimen, too. My Czech VZ54 is pretty rare, but this target rifle is even more rare.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    There is a reason there aren't a lot of M-N target rifles.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    There is a reason there aren't a lot of M-N target rifles.
    I suppose so. Not sure why, though, other than folks in this part of the world have spent a lot more time working with Mauser, Springfield (Mauser copy), and other similar actions. The Finns did just fine with their Mosin Nagant target rifles, though. So, yeah, not a lot of target rifles made from Mosin Nagant actions, but that's not the same as saying it can't be done.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptrthgr8 View Post
    I suppose so. Not sure why, though, other than folks in this part of the world have spent a lot more time working with Mauser, Springfield (Mauser copy), and other similar actions. The Finns did just fine with their Mosin Nagant target rifles, though. So, yeah, not a lot of target rifles made from Mosin Nagant actions, but that's not the same as saying it can't be done.
    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    Would NEVER say that. But there are a lot of actions that are easier to work with and more likely to come out right - and then there is the familiarity issue.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  25. #25
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    Hi, folks.

    Saturday I had the chance to spend a small amount of time at the range testing my new rifle Ė only had about 90 mins or so, but figured it would give me a good idea if the project was a complete failure or if there was some potential.

    I started off at the 50 yard line shooting the Soviet surplus 3KCTPA "Extra" 200 gr. match ammo. This stuff is supposed to be even more accurate than the 7N1 ďsniperĒ ammo:



    First target is below. The 7 shots to the left in the black were me walking the POI to the middle. (Not sure why the laser bore sighter was so far off to begin with, but at least it was on paper.) The two shots in the lower left corner were intentional - I was trying to see where it was printing after making some windage adjustments. The last 5 shot group in the red told me I had the rifle on paper. It was then time to move on to the handloads.



    A few years ago I started loading for my Finnish Mosin Nagants. I had written to the folks at Lapua (who had made the cartridges used by the Finns during the war years) and they provided me with the info for a cartridge that would be as close as possible to the as-issued D166 round. Hereís what I used:

    Bullet: Lapua D166 200gr.
    Primer: WLR
    Case: Lapua 7.62x53R
    Powder: N140, 38.2gr
    OAL: 2.992"

    Hereís the 10-shot group of these handloads at 50 yards:



    Before moving from the 50 yard line to the 100 yard range, I decided to dump 30 rounds of IMI 855 surplus ammo through my Rock River AR Ė I wanted to see if my ACOG (a TA31RCO-M150CP) was still zeroed well enough for zombie blasting. It is Ė hereís 30 rounds of semi-rapid fire:



    We had to wait a little while to retrieve targets before moving to the 100 yard range. We then had to wait a little while before being able to set up a target down range. By the time I got the 100 yard target set, I only had time for one 15-round group of those handloads I had made. The results are very promising:



    Those 15 shots were done pretty quickly. Somewhere around 10mins or so? No chance for the barrel to cool down anyhow. Time was a factor and I also wanted to see how the heavy barrel reacted when it got warmed up. The three fliers are all my fault Ė rushed too much and didnít control my breathing properly and/or didnít have a solid grip on the resting hand before pulling the trigger.

    Looks like I need to adjust the POI left a little for those handloads, but overall Iím quite pleased with the potential this rifle shows. Iíd say I did pretty well for the first time out with this rifle. Itís only going to get better.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

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    why r u using such a large target..such a waste...lol
    waiting to hear more..you going to shoot the sie 174 mk's also ??

    mike in co

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    I am using SMK 174, 50 grains RL-19, Privi cases, WLP, and about .002" off of the rifling, shoots below 1" at 100 yd.
    Basic setup like yours.

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    Here's a shot of the customized bolt. The name was stamped in the same orientation as the original Soviet S/N. I would have preferred that it be stamped upside down so it would have been upside right with the bolt closed... but it's still pretty cool to have your name on a rifle. Even if it is upside down.

    Still it is a wonderfully built rifle and is as accurate as any big name brand. I haven't found any sub-sonic factory loads in 7.62x54 yet. Have you tried to load up any sub-sonic rounds to hear how well the silencer works?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by shepard5348 View Post
    Still it is a wonderfully built rifle and is as accurate as any big name brand. I haven't found any sub-sonic factory loads in 7.62x54 yet. Have you tried to load up any sub-sonic rounds to hear how well the silencer works?
    No, I haven't loaded up any of those yet - haven't even used the can on this rifle yet. I'm sure I'll get some more range time with this rifle this year (though the North Dakota winter is fast approaching), but I doubt I'll get much of a chance to do any loading for this rifle until winter sets in and I need something to keep my busy on the weekends.

    Cheers,

    ~ Greg ~
    "Any people whatsoever have the right to abolish the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable, a most sacred right." -- Abraham Lincoln, 4 July 1848

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    Likely that Finn load would do pretty darn good through your Nebraska winter.... It's pretty cold there too - I hear...

    Thanks

  31. #31
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    Here is a little "dressing" for that bolt if you want to pretty it up even more:
    http://www.boltcheckering.com/

    Click image for larger version. 

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  32. #32
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    Very nice
    ISAIAH 41:10

    I'd rather be biblically correct than politically correct.......

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