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Thread: The day of the home-made Glock frame is upon us.

  1. #1
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    Default The day of the home-made Glock frame is upon us.

    If an AR receiver can be made this way, then the made at home polymer pistol frame is here.

    http://www.dailytexanonline.com/news...-printable-gun

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grandpa Mark View Post
    If an AR receiver can be made this way, then the made at home polymer pistol frame is here.

    http://www.dailytexanonline.com/news...-printable-gun
    Someone tried.... the frame made 6 rounds before self-disassembly occured......... As usual, the hype /reality mismatch is severe..........
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    I'm old enough not to discount how quickly materials can advance when there is a need to be filled.

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    Is there ANYTHING bubba won't try ?



    FIVESHOT

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    As I recall, many poo pooed the idea of a plastic frame - now how many of them are there? It's just a matter of time before solutions are found, and this becomes a reliable manufacturing method.
    "When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
    Edmund Burke - 1770

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chukmak View Post
    As I recall, many poo pooed the idea of a plastic frame - now how many of them are there? It's just a matter of time before solutions are found, and this becomes a reliable manufacturing method.
    Which plastic frames use plastic rails to hold the slide on?
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

  7. #7
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    Like I said, " It's just a matter of time..."
    "When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
    Edmund Burke - 1770

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    Which plastic frames use plastic rails to hold the slide on?
    Looks like Ruger already does with their P345 frames.
    "Hey Look! We've got Guns ... and We've got Snacks!"
    - Cdr. Samuel "Sam" Axe, USN, (ret) -

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    We'll see how well those hold up under a few thousand rounds.

    For 98% of owners (who won't shoot it NEARLY that much), it might be fine.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    Someone tried.... the frame made 6 rounds before self-disassembly occured......... As usual, the hype /reality mismatch is severe..........
    The self-disassembly probably started on round 1. There's lots of materials limitations on 3-D printers and mostly they are just useful for scaring the non-gun cognizant news media and public into thinking every geek will be churning out machine guns. Already been on CSI, except they had enough sense, barely, to make it a single shot throwaway.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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    Couple of yrs ago the son of a gunsmith manufactured a slide for the 1911 in 30.30, not satisfied with the power of the round chambered it for 308, went to the range and fired the pistol...the slide went cleanly through his head , an extreme case of how daring can bubba be-
    I am an international Gunboards patron

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    Quote Originally Posted by raul View Post
    Couple of yrs ago the son of a gunsmith manufactured a slide for the 1911 in 30.30, not satisfied with the power of the round chambered it for 308, went to the range and fired the pistol...the slide went cleanly through his head , an extreme case of how daring can bubba be-
    Darwin has a success story every now and again.....................
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    Remember the story of the .45 Liberator of WW II...it only had to fire ONE shot to be able to disarm and Enemy soldier and take/use his (Steel) Gun...admittedly, the Liberator was made of steel, and could (slowly) fire well over 100 shots before loosening up...

    With a Plastic Gun ( even one of the better, high strenght plastics) it would still only need ONE well placed shot to acquire a "real" (read metallic) Gun for further use.

    Just like the Eritrean rebels using electrical tape and a 7,62x39 cartridge in a Vetterli-Vitali 10,4mm Rifle, to acquire an AK etc. During their Liberation war...all it needs is one well placed bullet

    SunTzu: "Let the enemy be your quartermaster"...also adopted by Mao Ze Dong ( Mao Tse-Tung) in his seminal "Guerilla Warfare"

    Regards,
    DocAV

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    "He said while a license was not required to print just the lower receiver of the AR-15, he may need a federal firearms license to print an entire gun..."

    Maybe this guy isn't all that good at the law business.

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    Plastics WILL come around to be this strong, someday, some how, it will happen...

    Until then, people can still use 3d printers to cut alloys no? Someone could craft up a metal receiver just the same, all the printer needs is the proper cutting tools

    A whole new can of worms will be opened... not yet, but it will happen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pancho View Post
    "He said while a license was not required to print just the lower receiver of the AR-15, he may need a federal firearms license to print an entire gun..."

    Maybe this guy isn't all that good at the law business.
    Not so. It is perfectly legal to manufacture a firearm for your personal use. Doesn't even need a serial number.

    FEDERAL FIREARMS REGULATIONS
    REFERENCE GUIDE
    2005

    P. 175

    (A6) Does the GCA prohibit anyone
    from making a handgun, shotgun
    or rifle?
    With certain exceptions a firearm
    may be made by a nonlicensee provided
    it is not for sale and the maker
    is not prohibited from possessing
    firearms. However, a person is prohibited
    from assembling a nonsporting
    semi-automatic rifle or nonsporting
    shotgun from imported parts*. In addition,
    the making of an NFA firearm
    requires a tax payment and approval
    by ATF. An application to make a
    machinegun will not be approved
    unless documentation is submitted
    showing that the firearm is being
    made for a Federal or State agency.
    [18 U.S.C. 922(o) and (r), 26 U.S.C.
    5822, 27 CFR

    * All you need are enough domestic parts - see 922r - commonly done with AKs
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    Not so. It is perfectly legal to manufacture a firearm for your personal use. Doesn't even need a serial number.

    FEDERAL FIREARMS REGULATIONS
    REFERENCE GUIDE
    2005

    P. 175

    (A6) Does the GCA prohibit anyone
    from making a handgun, shotgun
    or rifle?
    With certain exceptions a firearm
    may be made by a nonlicensee provided
    it is not for sale and the maker
    is not prohibited from possessing
    firearms. However, a person is prohibited
    from assembling a nonsporting
    semi-automatic rifle or nonsporting
    shotgun from imported parts*. In addition,
    the making of an NFA firearm
    requires a tax payment and approval
    by ATF. An application to make a
    machinegun will not be approved
    unless documentation is submitted
    showing that the firearm is being
    made for a Federal or State agency.
    [18 U.S.C. 922(o) and (r), 26 U.S.C.
    5822, 27 CFR

    * All you need are enough domestic parts - see 922r - commonly done with AKs

    In Vermont we are prohibited from making "zip guns" which qualify as any firearm not made by a licensed manufacturer if I am correct... you could make a tube that slap shoots a .22 or you could make a perfect AR-15 reconstruction, but if I am correct both are illegal... that is wild, you are federally allowed to make your own?

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    I understand how it's theoretically legal under federal law to manufacture a gun, however this guy doesn't seem to understand that it's the lower, not the upper of an AR-15 that's subject to federal law.

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    You can "3D print" lots of different materials, including metal. It's still more expensive than machining, however, but it does allow for some designs that cannot be machined.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nitrohuck View Post
    In Vermont we are prohibited from making "zip guns" which qualify as any firearm not made by a licensed manufacturer if I am correct... you could make a tube that slap shoots a .22 or you could make a perfect AR-15 reconstruction, but if I am correct both are illegal... that is wild, you are federally allowed to make your own?
    4013. Zip guns; switchblade knives
    A person who possesses, sells or offers for sale a weapon commonly known as a "zip" gun, or a weapon commonly known as a switchblade knife, the blade of which is three inches or more in length, shall be imprisoned not more than 90 days or fined not more than $100.00, or both. (1959, No. 151, eff. May 5, 1959; amended 1981, No. 223 (Adj. Sess.), 23.)

    The common definition is: "a crude homemade single-shot pistol", Mirriam-Webster

    So if its neither crude or single shot you are home free. Given the small fine the state will fold and my best guess is that this law was written to keep kids from making zip guns in shop class 50 + years ago.

    BTW there are a number of successful AR lowers made in plastic, but the molded plastics used are stronger than those in a 3-D printer and the best are composites with fiberglass or graphite. So far prejudice against plastic and fear of failures has kept them limited despite the usually lower cost and lower weight.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  21. #21
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    This reminds me of a science fiction story from - i don;t recall exactly when, but i think the 1950s, seems like I read it before i started college. Essentially, the inhabitants of Earth had to come up with a way to duplicate alien technology or bad things would happen (or maybe good ones wouldnlt - been a long time). in any case, they managed to develop a way to construct things using what the writer called (if memory serves) molecular spray, which would be a very sophisticated version of the 2D printer, with better (well, complete) control of what was laid down, etc..

    This strikes me as the first, crude, steps on the way to that sort of thing - which I suspect we will see, though probably not in my lifetime.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    4013. Zip guns; switchblade knives
    A person who possesses, sells or offers for sale a weapon commonly known as a "zip" gun, or a weapon commonly known as a switchblade knife, the blade of which is three inches or more in length, shall be imprisoned not more than 90 days or fined not more than $100.00, or both. (1959, No. 151, eff. May 5, 1959; amended 1981, No. 223 (Adj. Sess.), 23.)

    The common definition is: "a crude homemade single-shot pistol", Mirriam-Webster

    So if its neither crude or single shot you are home free. Given the small fine the state will fold and my best guess is that this law was written to keep kids from making zip guns in shop class 50 + years ago.

    BTW there are a number of successful AR lowers made in plastic, but the molded plastics used are stronger than those in a 3-D printer and the best are composites with fiberglass or graphite. So far prejudice against plastic and fear of failures has kept them limited despite the usually lower cost and lower weight.

    Ahhhha thanks for clearing that up. And yeah, you are probably right that it was meant to keep kids from making zip guns in shop class back in the 50's haha,

    So is what this guy did illegal if AR lowers are ATF regulated? He said he applied for one and was still waiting in the article

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