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Thread: Glock blow-up

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    Default Glock blow-up

    Does anyone have any info about a Glock blow-up at Willow Slough (Morrocco) Indiana DNR range today? My wife was there today with our neighbors shooting and someone on the range had a Glock that blew up on him. The slide cracked open and the side panels of the grip blew out. The cartridge had seperated at the base and the slug was stuck in the barrel.Also the extractor blew off into the thumb and face of the shooter causing cuts and bleeding. The range master showed my wife the gun and she said it was a total loss including damage to the frame and the slide. Apparently the guy was using hot reloads but it may have fired out of battery. Or he may have shot after having a squib. I understand that leading is also a problem with the Glocks. I don't know the model number or what reloads he was using. Apparently the shooter will be okay but may need stitches.
    Last edited by PoppaPooter; 04-06-2013 at 11:30 AM.

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    Leading is a gradual build-up issue with Glocks, not sudden, but, maybe he didn't clean it for 5 or 600 rounds of cast....

    My betting money if it fired O.O.B. If you never ever change the recoil spring in them, they WILL, sooner or later, because the trigger cocking it will overpower the recoil spring as it gets tired, and it will "unlock" and fire before the disconnector operates.

    To "blow up" a fully closed gun, you have to exceed the proofing pressures, or be right around them a bunch of times to get it to fatigue fail. That's 46,000psi. for 9mmP

    Yes, there are handloaders who are that much dumbarse.............., gives the rest of us a bad name......

    Then the handloaders who think saving a penny a round on a round that already cost 10-14 pennies is worth using extremely small charges of very fast burning and dense powders (3 or 4 grains of Bullseye, Accurate Arms #2, and others), a double charge is ALMOST optically invisible inside the case (if you even look), put a bullet on it, it's a gun-killer.
    At least when you blow one of these up in a steel frame, you don't get hand damage from it, usually also only the barrel and slide die. Blows the plastic wonders right to shreds, and does the hand holding it no favors.
    Last edited by Oldstuffer; 04-06-2013 at 07:36 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    At least when you blow one of these up in a steel frame, you don't get hand damage from it, usually also only the barrel and slide die. Blows the plastic wonders right to shreds, and does the hand holding it no favors.
    One point to consider. Steel parts will show up on an X-ray while the plastic pieces will be very difficult to find using X-rays. If you have a polymer frame pistol blow-up, you my be carrying the frame pieces in your body for the rest of your life.
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    Nope, no info on yesterday's incident.

    Are there any stats available on the Glock's? My buddy bulged the barrel on his 19, or rather a guest shooter did with Remington factory loads.

    Thought it might have been a squib, but never really knew for sure.

    We replaced the barrel and she's been good to go since.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanaeDad View Post
    Nope, no info on yesterday's incident.

    Are there any stats available on the Glock's? My buddy bulged the barrel on his 19, or rather a guest shooter did with Remington factory loads.

    Thought it might have been a squib, but never really knew for sure.

    We replaced the barrel and she's been good to go since.
    There's been a few factory mistake lots blow up a few Glocks, there's also been badly-made handloads blow some up (either double-charges or poorly crimped (.40 S&W is BAD BAD about pressure spikes from shortening, much worse than others), also been OOB firings blast some too.........

    Bulged barrels are usually from a squib. A "simple" drastic over-pressure may blow the chamber, it WILL NOT bulge the barrel part-way to the muzzle. That is from a barrel obstruction.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    I have seen this first hand. Lead build up is def. a problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    Bulged barrels are usually from a squib. A "simple" drastic over-pressure may blow the chamber, it WILL NOT bulge the barrel part-way to the muzzle. That is from a barrel obstruction.

    Thanks for the confirmation.

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    Two different cops on the local PD had Glocks blow about a month apart on their range. They were .40 cal. but I do not remember the model. The follow up investigation blamed it on hot loaded Speer LE factory ammo and something about the chamber being partially unsupported. The PD turned them all in and went with S&W .40 cal. and I haven't heard of any problems since.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wynn View Post
    Two different cops on the local PD had Glocks blow about a month apart on their range. They were .40 cal. but I do not remember the model. The follow up investigation blamed it on hot loaded Speer LE factory ammo and something about the chamber being partially unsupported. The PD turned them all in and went with S&W .40 cal. and I haven't heard of any problems since.
    But how could something like that happen? The Glock is the perfect pistol, just ask the Glockophiles...
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    But how could something like that happen? The Glock is the perfect pistol, just ask the Glockophiles...
    They will say it is operator error.
    Laugh hard and often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wynn View Post
    Two different cops on the local PD had Glocks blow about a month apart on their range. They were .40 cal. but I do not remember the model. The follow up investigation blamed it on hot loaded Speer LE factory ammo and something about the chamber being partially unsupported. The PD turned them all in and went with S&W .40 cal. and I haven't heard of any problems since.
    Unless well crimped, autopistols tend to push bullets backward into the case when feeding. IF and WHEN this happens, it makes little difference to MOST cartridges.

    To .40 S&W, it has been seen that 10-thousandths shortening CAN DOUBLE the pressures of a loading, or more. 77,000psi has been seen.

    No .40 Smith in the world is proofed to over 70,000psi.

    .40 Smith is a good cartridge, but it is VERY twitchy....... and it isn't the gun's faults.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    "Apparently the guy was using hot reloads" Says it all. That wasn't a Glock fault but a gross overpressure.

    And that pressure increase from bullet pushback can happen with ANY cartridge where the case is full or close to it. Improperly crimped 9mm Pb and 45 ACP also have big pressure increases if the crimp fails and the bullet gets rammed back into the case, compressing the propellant. Usually this only happens with multiple chamberings of the same cartridge but handloads would be of greater risk here since many loaders use case mouth crimping sensitive to the press setup.

    The .40 S&W got its bad reputation strictly from the early .40 pistols designed for 9mm that were quickly reworked for .40, lengthening the feed ramp into the chamber, leaving the same sort of unsupported area as the 45ACP but at twice the pressure. Avoid those older pistols and buy nothing but ones with fully supported chambers.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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    RELOADS. I own a nice variety of pistol types. New to old, steel to plastic. Glock bashers crack me up as well as 1911 bashers.

    Glock explodes guy was shooting reloads lets debate how crappy the Glock is. WTF?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    "Apparently the guy was using hot reloads" Says it all. That wasn't a Glock fault but a gross overpressure.

    And that pressure increase from bullet pushback can happen with ANY cartridge where the case is full or close to it. Improperly crimped 9mm Pb and 45 ACP also have big pressure increases if the crimp fails and the bullet gets rammed back into the case, compressing the propellant. Usually this only happens with multiple chamberings of the same cartridge but handloads would be of greater risk here since many loaders use case mouth crimping sensitive to the press setup.

    The .40 S&W got its bad reputation strictly from the early .40 pistols designed for 9mm that were quickly reworked for .40, lengthening the feed ramp into the chamber, leaving the same sort of unsupported area as the 45ACP but at twice the pressure. Avoid those older pistols and buy nothing but ones with fully supported chambers.
    There was a video of a guy shooting a AR 15 and beating the cartridge into battery with the palm of his hand using the foreward assist on Youtube. On top of it all he was using reloads. It can be easily found I am sure but the AR kabooms and a bottomless debate in the comments section goes on about how crappy the AR is etc. etc.. I don't know how you take the time to try and educate people who know it all...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdub View Post
    There was a video of a guy shooting a AR 15 and beating the cartridge into battery with the palm of his hand using the foreward assist on Youtube. On top of it all he was using reloads. It can be easily found I am sure but the AR kabooms and a bottomless debate in the comments section goes on about how crappy the AR is etc. etc.. I don't know how you take the time to try and educate people who know it all...
    Admittedly, that is what the Fwd. Assist is for on an AR, BUT, it is only supposed to be used as a solution to a dirty gun, not ammo that doesn't fit.

    You DO have a situation where a lot of AR loaders (those new to the AR or new to the handloading hobby) try to follow the guidance of accuracy-hounds that use bolt action rifles, often making ammo that isn't going to fit well, or function, and they battle this for quite a while until they get it figured out.
    I don't feed an AR, but my #1 rifle is a self-loader, and I see the questions and issues on handloading boards, and I try to help them out.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    Why would anyone shoot lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol?

    If you can't afford jacketed bullets, don't shoot! JMHO, .22 lr excepted of course.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    Admittedly, that is what the Fwd. Assist is for on an AR, BUT, it is only supposed to be used as a solution to a dirty gun, not ammo that doesn't fit.

    You DO have a situation where a lot of AR loaders (those new to the AR or new to the handloading hobby) try to follow the guidance of accuracy-hounds that use bolt action rifles, often making ammo that isn't going to fit well, or function, and they battle this for quite a while until they get it figured out.
    I don't feed an AR, but my #1 rifle is a self-loader, and I see the questions and issues on handloading boards, and I try to help them out.
    You go smacking the FA on an AR to get the cartridge all the way into battery you now have a situation where the neck is pushed into the rifling creating high pressure "in that situation." Thumb pressure only. On reloads it wouldn't take an expert to understand you have a problem and the cartridge was loaded improperly or not trimmed. NEVER FORCE A CARTRIDGE INTO CHAMBER. Please don't tell people to force rounds into battery with the FA on an AR or any other firearm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 03man View Post
    Why would anyone shoot lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol?

    If you can't afford jacketed bullets, don't shoot! JMHO, .22 lr excepted of course.
    In the old day I shot tons of lead bullet 45acp loads with zero problems. There's really no reason not to shoot lead bullets in coventional rifling other than barrel leading if your alloy isn't right or you're pushing them at too high velocity. What does semi-auto have to do with it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 03man View Post
    Why would anyone shoot lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol?

    If you can't afford jacketed bullets, don't shoot! JMHO, .22 lr excepted of course.
    What's wrong with shooting lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol??????
    Lube your bullets correctly and clean your bore from any lead build up if necessary.
    Handloaders have been shooting cast lead bullets in semi-auto pistols since before many of us were born.
    Some pistols may not be the best to accept cast lead bullets, but as long as you keep the bore clean from any lead build up I don't see where the problem comes in. And a hot load can do damage to any given pistol at any given time if not properly cleaned. No matter if it is with a lead or jacketed projectile. Jacketed bullets also leave obstructions in the bore after firing. Keep letting it build up and you have more bore constriction. Clean your weapon after firing. Simple.
    Hot loads in a dirty bore just increases the potential for hazard. No matter if you are using cast lead or jacketed bullets. And jacketed bullets would seem to be the worse, as they are much less forgiving than lead.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 03man View Post
    Why would anyone shoot lead bullets in a semi-auto pistol?

    If you can't afford jacketed bullets, don't shoot! JMHO, .22 lr excepted of course.
    They are cheap and work well as long as you clean the barrel and delead. Takes a little work but absolutely necessary for accuracy and function. It's actually harder in a revolver as they build up lead faster.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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    I have looked at the incident with the AR 15 blowing up, I believe he extracted a crap round, the bullet stayed in the barrel, he used the bolt assist a couple of times later with no luck, thus forcing the bullet down the barrel, until a round was able to chamber, and off she went.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    They are cheap and work well as long as you clean the barrel and delead. Takes a little work but absolutely necessary for accuracy and function. It's actually harder in a revolver as they build up lead faster.
    How so????
    If a man has nothing greater to believe in than himself, he is a very lonely man.

    I reckon so. I guess we all died a little in that damn war.

    And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind.
    Quote Originally Posted by MEJ1990TM View Post
    Well, all right. Maybe just this once.

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    West Virginia ...an officer's gun blew up with factory loads at a range during qualifying ?
    A news release through all 911's released to all police depts.....
    I had gotten a new one 40 cal...wife worked at 911 remembered I had gotten one...
    No more info was released?......I sold trader it for a Styre 9mm never got back in the 40's again .
    So that's one cal....I don't have to by ammo for!

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    Its not just glocks. I personnally witnessed a single action Ruger Blackhawk blow up at the range. The cylinder blew right in half and the top of the frame bent like an upside down letter U.

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    With dedicated ignorance, any gun can be blown up....

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    Quote Originally Posted by M16A2556MM View Post
    Its not just glocks. I personnally witnessed a single action Ruger Blackhawk blow up at the range. The cylinder blew right in half and the top of the frame bent like an upside down letter U.
    I'll betcha it was loaded with a doube or triple charged cartridge, likely Bullseye or AA No.2 powder.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    The worst I have seen was a fella who charged his muzzle loader with smokeless powder. Barrel and stock were destroyed. IIRC he wasn't killed, but did spend time in hospital & ended up with permanent injuries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbullets View Post
    The worst I have seen was a fella who charged his muzzle loader with smokeless powder. Barrel and stock were destroyed. IIRC he wasn't killed, but did spend time in hospital & ended up with permanent injuries.
    That will happen. There is a reason people are warned against using nitro powder in front-stuffers. But if you won't listen, you may learn the hard way.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Quote Originally Posted by armyrat1970 View Post
    How so????
    The junction of cylinder and barrel and the forcing cone, usually in the barrel, build up lead faster than the barrel of an autoloader. Even the smallest misalignment makes it worse and hot magnum rounds add to the leading. I have to clean my 44 mags much more often than any autoloader, even the 10mm Colt I shot lead bullet reloads in.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    The junction of cylinder and barrel and the forcing cone, usually in the barrel, build up lead faster than the barrel of an autoloader. Even the smallest misalignment makes it worse and hot magnum rounds add to the leading. I have to clean my 44 mags much more often than any autoloader, even the 10mm Colt I shot lead bullet reloads in.
    Which why when i am loading any of my magnum revolvers up hot (say in excess of 1000 fps), i use jacketed bullets. Of course, don't have that many magnum revolvers - a Ruger Single Six in .32 H&R "Magnum" (not sure it ought to be called that), a Model 19 in .357, and a Model 57 in .41. And a Ruger Blackhawk in .357.
    Last edited by Clyde; 04-12-2013 at 12:46 PM.
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    I might be wrong but doesn't Glock say not to use cast lead bullets in their pistols but only jacketed ones that it voids the guarantee
    Garry Lycos
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    mrbullets, did you see on you tube 50 cal explodes, what a explosion, chap was not injured, but makes you think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    I'll betcha it was loaded with a doube or triple charged cartridge, likely Bullseye or AA No.2 powder.
    That is always the smart bet, and is usually a winner.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    Quote Originally Posted by galyc4 View Post
    I might be wrong but doesn't Glock say not to use cast lead bullets in their pistols but only jacketed ones that it voids the guarantee
    So does a host of other gunmakers, and not just ones with polygonal rifled barrels.

    It gives them a warranty out for someone who doesn't clean their Glock after shooting cast.

    I have shot, and still shoot, IDPA with literally, HUNDREDS of Glock shooters, handloaders, who feed thousands of cast bullets thru their Glocks every year, without blowing them up.
    They clean the barrels every couple hundred rounds or so tho, so buildup is managed by cleaning, it is not sudden (near instantaneous) and severe.
    I don't always venture out into the sub-freezing darkness, but when I do, it is hunting season, and I carry a Browning. Stay hungry my friends.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjk308 View Post
    The junction of cylinder and barrel and the forcing cone, usually in the barrel, build up lead faster than the barrel of an autoloader. Even the smallest misalignment makes it worse and hot magnum rounds add to the leading. I have to clean my 44 mags much more often than any autoloader, even the 10mm Colt I shot lead bullet reloads in.
    Ahhhh. I see your point. No revolvers are in perfect timing and alignment.
    If a man has nothing greater to believe in than himself, he is a very lonely man.

    I reckon so. I guess we all died a little in that damn war.

    And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind.
    Quote Originally Posted by MEJ1990TM View Post
    Well, all right. Maybe just this once.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldstuffer View Post
    Admittedly, that is what the Fwd. Assist is for on an AR, BUT, it is only supposed to be used as a solution to a dirty gun, not ammo that doesn't fit.

    You DO have a situation where a lot of AR loaders (those new to the AR or new to the handloading hobby) try to follow the guidance of accuracy-hounds that use bolt action rifles, often making ammo that isn't going to fit well, or function, and they battle this for quite a while until they get it figured out.
    I don't feed an AR, but my #1 rifle is a self-loader, and I see the questions and issues on handloading boards, and I try to help them out.
    I did this. My first couple of 223 batches would not chamber at all in an AR. You do not have to be off by much to cause these problems. Easy enough to fix once you see what the issue is, but its a very easy mistake to make.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnin View Post
    I did this. My first couple of 223 batches would not chamber at all in an AR. You do not have to be off by much to cause these problems. Easy enough to fix once you see what the issue is, but its a very easy mistake to make.
    What I was seeing in the video was a guy beating on the FA. I have had some out of spec ammunition before. I have a 5.56 barrel and it only happened with one type of ammo 4 years ago. It would not chamber and you could see rifling marks on the neck of the cartridge. Some people don't understand that if you beat the cartridge in you squeeze the bullet and creat a high pressure situation.

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