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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    463

    Default P serial MLe 1936

    I picked this up last week in addition to the project 36 which I'm looking for a stock set still......
    I don't know the date of manufacture because the barrel was replaced with a 1965 dated one. There is a deep P68 stamp on the left side of the receiver which I presume was when it was refurbed.
    The bolt matches and the bore is pristine , on a side note. What where the standards used to determine if a re-barrel was in order?







    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    4,656

    Default

    The original P series was made in 1949, the P68 stamp is re-furbishment mark which means it was done in 1968 at Etablissement du Matériel de Poitiers

    Patrick
    Vive La République Française, le Lebel et le poilu
    Verdun 1916: "Ils ne Passeront pas" "On les aura!"
    Fusil d'Infanterie Modèle 1886 Modifié 1893 dit "Lebel"

    Co-Author of Banzai Special Project No. 1 Revised Edition
    The Siamese Mauser
    A Study Of Siamese / Thai Type 45 & Type 46 Long Rifles and Type 47 Carbines, Including An Overview Of Siamese/Thai Weapons 1860–2014

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    963

    Default

    Gunguy98:

    The French members can answer your barrel question. I should think that it is better than 'OK'. If the edges of the lands are sharp, what more could you want. I have some pre-Armistice rifles which bullet test near half-life, but shoot to point of aim with a 2' expectation. These rifles are accurate to their dieing day, just like the 03/03A3 Springfield. If it has been reworked for reserve storage, it will have to be shot-in to bring it back to its true self. Just an aside, but the "P" series was a bit of a 'lost patrol', as very few seem to have survived. Have fun and ask questions. Never give up on these reworks, as there is a very pleasent tool hidden beneith all that Parkerization.
    Last edited by orcmastiffs; 04-27-2013 at 08:12 AM. Reason: Tpyto

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Cote d'Azur and Brittany France
    Posts
    1,800

    Default

    The set of military bore gauges for rifles and MGs in 7,5x54 is as follows:

    Dia 7,50mm = minimum acceptable bore.

    Dia 7,54mm = selection for accuracy.

    Dia 7,56mm = minimum bore for machine gun barrels used for overhead live fire training.

    Dia 7,58mm = barrel rejection in Arsenal.

    Dia 7,61mm = weapon rejection in unit.

    kelt

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by orcmastiffs View Post
    Gunguy98:

    The French members can answer your barrel question. I should think that it is better than 'OK'. If the edges of the lands are sharp, what more could you want. I have some pre-Armistice rifles which bullet test near half-life, but shoot to point of aim with a 2' expectation. These rifles are accurate to their dieing day, just like the 03/03A3 Springfield. If it has been reworked for reserve storage, it will have to be shot-in to bring it back to its true self. Just an aside, but the "P" series was a bit of a 'lost patrol', as very few seem to have survived. Have fun and ask questions. Never give up on these reworks, as there is a very pleasent tool hidden beneith all that Parterization.
    That's cool to know about the P series. Are there any other letter blocks that don't seem to show up too often? Over the years I've had 2 mystery rifles, 1 L series, and 1 G series. I've always had a soft spot for these rifles, my wife even likes them and she's partial to the sleek lines of modern type sporting rifles.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    963

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    Gunguy98:

    Forgive the belated reply, but weekends make their own demands. Of the serial production MAS Mle 1936, the least common is the elusive "F" series. It was purged from existence by the French for a reason which is not known. Most likely some fatal flaw was to blame. Even if the designers were able to move the project forward, we did not see the first "G"s until October, 1937. Production was very slow, showing only 7,000 units assembled from October, 1937 through March, 1938. (My thoughts are that the first two-thirds of the "G"s were the best contemporary rifles-of-the-line ever assembled.) The "G"s and the "H"s were those that did their part during the Battle of France. 200,000 by serial count, but how many effectives does not seem to be known. March through April "H"s are the most common and often the best preserved.

    Rarity befalls the endgame rifles, in the form of the truncated "J"s, (less than 25,000 ending no later than the first week of June, 1940; with 20/25% being ManuFrance). Then we have the 32,800 pre-Armistice "K"s, mostly assembled during the first three weeks of June, 1940. 60/70% of these were ManuFrance, and many are found as new. And we are told that 4,500 "L"s were manufactured prior to the Armistice, however I have never seen one that was not reworked, and understandably I have not seen many.

    The ManuFrance rifles, all of which are pre-Armistice, would be the least common, the untra rare "F"s and "L"s aside. A late "H" ManuFrance would be a find, as few were available that early, and it marks the first factory manifestation of the receiver improvement. Then we have the "J"s, (some in beautiful condition), with their Type2 receivers. A look at the "Collective Survey" will give you all of this for the pre-Armistice rifles. However, it will be of no help for the post-Liberation series. The "P"s are shown as less common from my notes, which deal with reworked rifles, along with the originals. The MAS Mle 1936 is only finding its place as a shooter. The time when collectors fill their 'penny-books' with every date and deviation will be long in the future, if it happens at all.

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