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Thread: What is the value of an uncut Webley Mark VI cylinder?

  1. #1
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    Default What is the value of an uncut Webley Mark VI cylinder?

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ID:	666170I have a cylinder from a Webley Mark VI that I want to sell. I had estimated it's current value between $250 and $300, but I saw that one sold on EBay for $416 in October of 2012. Does anyone have an estimate of what this is worth? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I will offer a non-expert reply pending the experts weighing in. Your cylinder with proper fitting still would create no better than a mismatched piece rather than recreating an original gun. I would rather have a converted but original all matching Mk VI than a mismatched piece, restored to "original" in chambering only. Also, strictly as a shooter rather than a collector piece, with judicious loads, the 45 ACP would be acceptable and most probably cheaper to shoot. As to eBay, "one rose doesn't make a summer'. Further, buyer motivation is an important factor. Perhaps the buyer had no cylinder at all. That would represent a distinct added value factor for such a situation.
    Though not speaking directly to your question, I would begin valuation by asking what a complete non-matching Mk Vi in original chambering would be worth compared with a non-matching converted model. Perhaps your cylinder would logically be worth the difference in value, if any. That would be my approach to such a valuation.
    Serialed part replacement with non-matching numbers does not restore originality. For a collector piece, the situation becomes problematic.
    My take.
    Last edited by iskra; 05-25-2013 at 08:28 PM. Reason: grammatical error

  3. #3
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    Put it on auction, then you will know.
    03man - Don Voigt
    Author of "The Japanese T99 Arisaka Rifle" 2010 edition
    Co-author of "The Knee Mortars of Japan 1921-1945" 2011 edition
    Near Charlotte, NC

  4. #4

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    Generally speaking, it is worth that much to the person to whom it is worth that much. For myself say if I had a cut down cylinder gun and wanted to shoot it as an original it would be very desirable and I would want to have two stores of ammo so I could when I wanted experience it as intended. Also as they become more rare even the miss matched parts guns will increase in value.
    Every day is an adventure of one sort or another, if you live, you learn.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for your thoughts. I have a very nice Mark VI with all matching numbers but the cylinder was cut before I got it. I did not have a good experience shooting the .45 ACP round in it, so I got this cylinder from Apex many years ago in order to shoot the proper round. I just change out cylinders before going to the range and it performs much better shooting the .455 ammo. I would never part with the original cylinder and have a mis-matched pistol. I just prefer shooting the correct ammo and changing the cylinder is very easy. Any prospective buyer would most likely fall into this category I suppose. I'll consider these things before listing it in an auction.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada Shooter View Post
    Thanks for your thoughts. I have a very nice Mark VI with all matching numbers but the cylinder was cut before I got it. I did not have a good experience shooting the .45 ACP round in it, so I got this cylinder from Apex many years ago in order to shoot the proper round. I just change out cylinders before going to the range and it performs much better shooting the .455 ammo. I would never part with the original cylinder and have a mis-matched pistol. I just prefer shooting the correct ammo and changing the cylinder is very easy.
    That is indeed the reason most people would want to have the uncut cylinder. I went a different route. I have a shaved Mark VI (From its stamps, it came to the US by way of being in New Zealand in 1939), for which I handload (sort of) .455 duplication rounds using .45 ACP cases using a 230 grain .452" lead bullet and about 4.2 grains of Unique.

    I get 'somewhat reasonable' accuracy from them from a point of aim standpoint, and I expect the groups will improve significantly when I get around to honing out my .447" cylinder throats to ,451"

  7. #7
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    Or you could use the correct hollow base bullets and save altering the pistol.

  8. #8
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    Well I got my answer today. I listed the cylinder on Gunbroker and it sold for $655 plus $20 shipping. So the market determined its value to be $675. Good heavens! That's more than I paid for my entire complete Mark VI! Anyway, I figured I'd post this so others interested in such things would know.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada Shooter View Post
    Well I got my answer today. I listed the cylinder on Gunbroker and it sold for $655 plus $20 shipping. So the market determined its value to be $675. Good heavens! That's more than I paid for my entire complete Mark VI! Anyway, I figured I'd post this so others interested in such things would know.
    Congrats, you had a "Pigeon" day.

    ("Some days you are the pigeon, some days you are the statue. And some days you are the poop.")
    Turning relics into near-relics since 2005.

  10. #10
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    Or some times the Bull wins.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkins View Post
    Or you could use the correct hollow base bullets and save altering the pistol.
    The cylinder has already been shaved. THAT boat has already sailed.

    It would also allow me to continue to use the cast lead bullets I use whole bunches of in my .45 ACP, and it would keep me from the necessity of laying in a supply of the significantly more expensive hollow-based bullets for exclusive use in just this one pistol.

  12. #12
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    Hasve a couple of shaved Webleys among the others and use .45Auto rim brass with webley hollow base bullets. No need for those half moon clips.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronbo6 View Post
    That is indeed the reason most people would want to have the uncut cylinder. I went a different route. I have a shaved Mark VI (From its stamps, it came to the US by way of being in New Zealand in 1939), for which I handload (sort of) .455 duplication rounds using .45 ACP cases using a 230 grain .452" lead bullet and about 4.2 grains of Unique.

    I get 'somewhat reasonable' accuracy from them from a point of aim standpoint, and I expect the groups will improve significantly when I get around to honing out my .447" cylinder throats to ,451"
    I would suggest slug the barrel and open cylinder .001-.002 larger.

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