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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    756

    Default Vintage Reloading Equipment

    I've been setting up my reloading bench and went through my grandpa's stuff again. I found a coupe of old presses I need identified and an appraisal.

    In this stash I found some primers. One box had September 1968 written on the inside. All the other boxes look about as old. I can't test them in an empty brass until some shell holders come in. I suppose I could smack them with a hammer but that doesn't quite equate to the force of a firing pin. Would there be any value to these? Safety concerns?

    Also found some IMR powder I'm assuming is quite old. I put a few granules on the floor and lit them with a lighter. Their response was prolonged but very surprising. I'm not sure how it's supposed to react to an open flame.

    For the press I found a couple of dies. They are only marked with 3 digits each. 165 and 166. There also appears to be something of a universal bullet seater. The other press is as best I can tell a bullet sizer and luber. There is a bullet sizing insert in original packaging as well.

    I'd like to get a quick dollar figure on the presses as I'd like to see them go to someone who can use and appreciate them. I will never use them.

    Excuse the mess, it's a work in progress. Also I did not steel wool the presses or dies, that was another project.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1.jpg   2.jpg   3.jpg  
    No wall is safe.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Beach Va
    Posts
    9,272

    Default

    check ebay for pricing,

    thinking they are lyman presses, a single stage and a Turrent

    no idea on the dies,

    don't discount them, I started with a Dillon 550 and a Forster Co-Ax, (and a vintage one)

    I use the Co-Ax much more than the Dillon, and have since picked up a CH monster single stage and an aluminum Texan,

    all work fine, (and I have a few vintage dies as well)


    as far as the powder, if is smells and looks ok , it may be,

    if not , use as fertilizer,

    the hodgdons can may be worth something, if you find a collector of old reloading stuff,

    the IMR, not so much
    what's so funny about peace love and understanding?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    756

    Default

    I just typed "Vintage Lyman" into ebay and discovered my press is a Lyman Tru Line Junior.
    The sizer/lubricator is a Lyman Ideal Lubricator & Sizer #45.

    Interesting stuff. Amazing to see these in mint condition for 100+ dollars. Seeing the availability of the "310" 5/8 inch dies makes me hesitant to get rid of these. Thanks for the info, they may get used after all.

    Now that I know what I'm dealing with, I've dug up some interesting information.

    According to this link the dies 165 and 166 are for 22 hornet and 257 roberts respectively.

    http://www.castpics.net/subsite/Lyma...CodeChart.html
    Last edited by Gorbachev; 07-01-2013 at 11:22 PM.
    No wall is safe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    5,031

    Default

    If the powder has gone bad, there will usually be a funny smell, and you will probably find a reddish-brown dust mixed in it.

    If the primers were stored OK, they will likely still be good to go. I would relegate those primers to plinking loads, though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Those Lyman items are used quite extensively yet today.
    I recently sent some 310 tools(handles both Sm and Lg) and dies to a fellow caster re-loader in Tasmania.
    Have 50 cal ammo can full of dies and etc I'm still cleaning and sorting.
    The sizer/lubing press is built on the fragile side, so care should be taken when using it.
    It had an insert in it which sizes the cast bullet to a desired diameter and applies lube to the grooves in the cast boolit.
    The Tru-line jr press is basically a neck sizing operation, with some FL in the pistol cases world.
    Uses unique shell holders and priming attachment.
    The powder measure is sort of sought after as well.
    I've got maybe four presses, three sizer/lube and as mentioned, can full of dies and etc.
    Quite often there were FL resizing dies used with these where the case was forced into a solid steel cylinder(resized) and then forced back out all done manually.
    You might find this link useful-or not.
    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...light=tru-line

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hayward, Wi
    Posts
    85

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbachev View Post
    I just typed "Vintage Lyman" into ebay and discovered my press is a Lyman Tru Line Junior.
    The sizer/lubricator is a Lyman Ideal Lubricator & Sizer #45.

    Interesting stuff. Amazing to see these in mint condition for 100+ dollars. Seeing the availability of the "310" 5/8 inch dies makes me hesitant to get rid of these. Thanks for the info, they may get used after all.

    Now that I know what I'm dealing with, I've dug up some interesting information.

    According to this link the dies 165 and 166 are for 22 hornet and 257 roberts respectively.

    http://www.castpics.net/subsite/Lyma...CodeChart.html
    Google the 310 Shop. He will be a wealth of information for you! Tell him I sent you! (Greg Topp, Hayward, Wiscibsub)
    thors

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    behind a pine tree in mississippi
    Posts
    3,300

    Default

    i found my dads 1960 old herters press in the shed. cleaned it up and greased it still using it today
    also the old dies and etc equipment..works better than new plastic stuff
    The Constitution does NOT grant us the right to keep and bear arms.....it acknowledges it.......its very important to understand the difference. The minute that we accept the premiss that the government grants us this right, we must also accept that it can rescind this right. The right to keep and bear arms, as correctly noted by The Founders, is given to us by God....period, end of discussion.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    756

    Default

    I got the Luber/Sizer all cleaned up and free of the hard black tar that was once bullet lube. The "dies" seem to be seized up however. Am I correct in assuming the center portion of the die should move down as the bullet is pushed into it? Seems kinda obvious.

    They're rust free but the 4 rows of holes around the dies still exhibit that black tar.

    The primers from 1968 go bang!
    No wall is safe.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    3,762

    Default

    Just heat the dies from the lube sizer with a hair dryer and the goo will melt.
    You are correct the core pin is a seal that moves up and down behind/below the bullet to keep the lube from leaking out of the die when
    there is no bullet in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbachev View Post
    I got the Luber/Sizer all cleaned up and free of the hard black tar that was once bullet lube. The "dies" seem to be seized up however. Am I correct in assuming the center portion of the die should move down as the bullet is pushed into it? Seems kinda obvious.

    They're rust free but the 4 rows of holes around the dies still exhibit that black tar.

    The primers from 1968 go bang!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    MT View ,,,arkansas
    Posts
    96

    Default

    I can't comment on the tru-line , but I have and still use the #45 sizers ( I have 2 on my bench) and the #55 powder thrower is still as accurate as the day I bought it ,

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    behind a pine tree in mississippi
    Posts
    3,300

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adrians View Post
    the #55 powder thrower is still as accurate as the day I bought it ,

    yep.....is what i.m using....btw, adrians, you need a copy of the herters owners manual?
    The Constitution does NOT grant us the right to keep and bear arms.....it acknowledges it.......its very important to understand the difference. The minute that we accept the premiss that the government grants us this right, we must also accept that it can rescind this right. The right to keep and bear arms, as correctly noted by The Founders, is given to us by God....period, end of discussion.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    564

    Default

    IIRC, you won't be able to use rcbs sizer dies in the No. 45. At least not as is. It needs the large set screw groove cut, which rcbs dies do not have. I say this because you will read that the two brands are interchangable, and that is 95% true except for this model. RCBS makes sizes that lyman does not, and vise versa, hence why people use both brands.
    Need help fixing a coleman camping appliance? Maybe I can help!

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