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Thread: Barleycorn Sight Picture

  1. #1
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    Default Barleycorn Sight Picture

    My memory is not the best, but I think I read on this forum some time ago that Swedish shooters used the old "V" notch and barleycorn front sight so that the sight picture held the top of the front sight at the bottom of the "V"; this of course was before the sight conversion. Such a sight picture would obviously drop the POI, so maybe this was a technique for engaging targets at less than 300 meters? Anyone have any information on this?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post
    My memory is not the best, but I think I read on this forum some time ago that Swedish shooters used the old "V" notch and barleycorn front sight so that the sight picture held the top of the front sight at the bottom of the "V"; this of course was before the sight conversion. Such a sight picture would obviously drop the POI, so maybe this was a technique for engaging targets at less than 300 meters? Anyone have any information on this?
    The 300 meter zero in a military issue is about putting your sights in the centre of mass of a human target and being able to achieve a hit somewhere on the torso. It's not about picking which button you are going to hit.
    Damn the expense, use your turn signals today... and as a special favour, try doing it before you have two wheels in the next lane.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by LVSteve View Post
    The 300 meter zero in a military issue is about putting your sights in the centre of mass of a human target and being able to achieve a hit somewhere on the torso. It's not about picking which button you are going to hit.
    Thanks for the input, but my enquiry was about the shooting technique using the barelycorn sight in general. The traditional Mauser sight did not accompany the US Springfield Model of 1903. US army sights, at least from the Krag onward, used a semi-circular notch and a blade. Swiss rifles always used a rounded notch and straight-sided front sight blades. The Swedes replaced their wedge-shaped front sight with a blade and filed the rear sight "V" to a rounded notch too. This seems to me to indicate recognition of how to make the rifle sights easier to use in general and not a method to correct POA for short ranges. However, I have read that many FSR shooters prefered the original "V" and that says something too about getting the optimal sight picture.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    Cant help the OP with his question but I sure like the barley corn sights on both my '02 m96 and '43 Husky FSR. I've set my sights for a 200 yard 6 oclock hold on NRA SR targets as I shoot the CMP Vintage matches.

    They are a "hard" sight to use (Barley corn front, "V" notch rear on the '02) but can be very accurate

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