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  1. #1
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    Default USS Boise battle damage report 11-12 Oct. 1942.


  2. #2
    Clyde's Avatar
    Clyde is offline Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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    Very interesting. Note reported enemy losses in report:

    1. The cruiser task force of which BOISE was a member made contact with a force of Japanese cruisers and destroyers off the west end of Guadalcanal Island on the night of 11-12 October, 1942. At 2346, using radar, BOISE opened fire on enemy ships; range about 4500 yards bearing 095 relative. In the ensuing engagement six Japanese vessels - 2CA, 1CL, and 3 DD - were under fire from BOISE and were sunk. Several were sunk before they could open fire. One heavy cruiser, distant about 7500 yards on relative bearing 040, succeeded in making two hits on BOISE at about 0012, one of which did considerable damage, before being taken under fire by SAN FRANCISCO and SALT LAKE CITY.

    This is the battle generally cited as the Battle of Cape Esperance. Rear Admiral Norman Scott was in command of the USN force, Rear Admiral Goto of the Japanese forces. Admiral Goto was killed in this battle.

    Japanese actual losses:
    IJN DD Fubuki (USN gunfire)
    IJN CA Furutaka (USN gunfire and torpedo)


    IJN DDs Murakumo and Natsugumo were heavily damaged by aircraft from Henderson Field the morning after the night battle and scuttled.

    Fog of war, eh?
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  3. #3
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    I believe the Boise and the Phoenix were both later sold to the Argentine navy. One of these was renamed the GENERAL BELGRANO and was sunk during the 1982 Flaklands war by a British submarine.

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    'Photo 13: Portions of base of projectile. Markings and design features indicate English manufacture.'

    Hmmm. Perfidious Albion at its finest......

    tac
    I am an international Gunboards patron

  5. #5
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    It was the Phoenix. When the Falklands War broke out I was detailed to NAVINTCOM in Suitland, Md. to monitor events and keep the Administration briefed. Had a "Ring-Side Seat" of the War! Very controversial Event!

  6. #6
    Clyde's Avatar
    Clyde is offline Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrunner 38 View Post
    It was the Phoenix. When the Falklands War broke out I was detailed to NAVINTCOM in Suitland, Md. to monitor events and keep the Administration briefed. Had a "Ring-Side Seat" of the War! Very controversial Event!
    Yes, quite controversial, in number of ways.

    I will note that if the Argentines didn't want the Belgrano sunk, they shouldn't have sailed into the Maritime Exclusion Zone with an Exocet-equipped vessel. Or any other for that matter, but the Belgrano having the ability to reach out made her a very high-priority target as she approached her engagement range.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tacfoley2 View Post
    'Photo 13: Portions of base of projectile. Markings and design features indicate English manufacture.'

    Hmmm. Perfidious Albion at its finest......

    tac
    Hmmmm, indeed. Couldn't find anything on the net about Japanese use of English-made munitions. Excuse my naivete, but was this a common thing? How were they procured - members of the commonwealth looking to make a quick buck perhaps?

  8. #8
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    wjneal is online now Diamond with Oak Clusters and Swords member
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    Were not the Japanese allies of the British in WW1? At what point did they cross over to the dark side?

    From Wikipedia:

    In the first week of World War I Japan proposed to the United Kingdom, its ally since 1902, that Japan would enter the war if it could take Germany's Pacific territories.[4] On 7 August 1914, the British government officially asked Japan for assistance in destroying the German raiders of the Kaiserliche Marine in and around Chinese waters. Japan sent Germany an ultimatum on 14 August 1914, which went unanswered; Japan then formally declared war on Germany on 23 August 1914. As Vienna refused to withdraw the Austro-Hungarian cruiser SMS Kaiserin Elisabeth from Tsingtao, Japan declared war on Austria-Hungary too.
    Wylie

  9. #9
    Clyde's Avatar
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    Japanese were indeed part of the Western Allies in WWI (allied not only with Britain but the other members of the coalition fighting the Central Powers). There was a considerable history of acquisition of warships and arms from Britain, and thereafter building local copies using the blueprints that came with the ships and guns bought from British firms (usually by agreement). The Kongos were originally built as battlecruisers around the time WWI broke out, with the lead ship bought from a British yard (Vickers). Complete with British 14" guns and ammunition.

    One of the effects of the Washington Naval Limitation Treaty following WWI was to sever the previously existing alliances between Japan and Great Britain, but that didn't mean existing designs were scrapped, nor that armaments couldn't be purchased from British sources - or existing items retained. For a number of reasons, it is unlikely that any British heavy gun ammunition was acquired later than the 1920s, other than materiel captured at Singapore and other over-run British possessions after December, 1941. That materiel wouldn't have gone to the fleet, but would have been (and was) used in defensive installations in many areas of the Japanese empire.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  10. #10
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    Japan was heavily influenced by Great Britian. Part os the Japanese navy as mentioned above was designed and built by the Brits. The Japanese adopted the British designs and used them as guides for their own ship building programs.
    The Japanese Navy used a British machine gun design in the 7.7mm guns found on the A6M Zero. The Japanese Navy 7.7mm round IS the .303 British.
    So there were times when the Brits and the Japanese (notice I did not use the unacceptable so called racial "Japs") were shooting at each other with the same gun design and the same cartridge.
    While I am on this line of trivia
    The Brits used a Besa machine gun in their tanks that shot 8X57 ammo so the Krauts and Limeys shot at each other with the 8x57.
    The Czechs designed the ZB-26 LMG which was ripped off by the Brits. The Czechs were occupied and subjugated by the Nazis who acquired the Czech guns. So somewhere the Axis and the Brits shot at each other with the same basic gun and ammo.

    And back to the Japanese - they even drive on the wrong side of the road.
    I am very disappointed in MacArthur. He had a chance to change that.

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