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  1. #1
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    Default Bramit device Nagant silencer

    Since I ordered my first 1895 Nagant the other day I looked up some info on them. Anyone ever seen a picture of the Bramit device?

    This is what I found on Wiki.

    During World War II, a small number of Nagant revolvers used by Russian recon and scout troops were outfitted with a variety of sound suppressor known as the “Bramit device.” The Cheka/NKVD/KGB were known to use the silenced Nagant for assassinations. Silenced Nagant revolvers, modified in clandestine metal shops, also turned up in the hands of Viet Cong guerrillas during the Vietnam War as assassination weapons. There is an example of a silenced Nagant M1895 in the CIA Museum in Langley, Virginia.

  2. #2
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    Default

    only picture out there is a drawing of one


  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks!

  4. #4

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    Far out... that looks completely unlike what I had imagined the Bramit device/suppressor to be.
    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y7/orderodonata/SigBan_AK2sm.jpg

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  5. #5
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    Jun 2008
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    Default

    Its a not BRAMIT device...

  6. #6
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    Default Original Bramit Device

    What you have shown is a diagram of the original BRAMIT device.

    In 1929 the brothers V.G. and I.G. Mitin (Β.Γ. Митин and И.Г. Митин) applied for a patent under the name “Revolver for soundless shooting utilizing the principle of directing the bullet through washers of increased diameter”.

    The revolver with the silencer device required cartridges of special construction. In the case of a standard revolver cartridge was a bullet of smaller diameter (probably 5.6 or 6.35 mm) backed by a special washer (sabot). The additional muzzle cylinder mounted on the muzzle of the gun had an opening corresponding to the caliber of the bullet small enough to catch washer. When shooting the bullet with the washer moves through the barrel, but was then caught in the supplemental cylinder. The washer plugged the exit through the supplimental cylinder and the gas was retained in the volume of the barrel. This hopefully blocked the exit of powder gasses.

    During the return of the cylinder of the revolver to retracted position, the cooled powder gasses escape, making no noise. On the next shot, during the hammer cock both the revolver cylinder and the supplemental cylinder move through 1/7 revolution. After firing all seven cartridges in the revolver, the shooter had to empty the spent cartridges from the cylinder and the washers from the supplemental cylinder.

    The patent was obtained for the soundless revolver on 28 February 1931.
    It's crude but that's the way it worked. Additionally would somebody let me know if the Russian letters came through correctly. Thanks
    Last edited by jleiper; 02-04-2009 at 06:12 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Later Bramit devices

    Here is the info on what is normally thought of as the BRAMIT silencer

    Later the Mitin brothers designed an expansion type silencer device This later BRAMIT device was a silencer of the expansion type and consisted of a hollow cylinder which was mounted on the barrel of the revolver. Inside the cylinder were nine rubber seals of about 8 mm thickness. This model of BRAMIT had 10 expansion chambers and simultaneously serveds as a flash hider. The construction of the device using rubber seals didn’t permit the use of standard cartridges. Passing through it, a bullet with a blunt noses lost stability and severly reduced accuracy even at short ranges. As a result of this, special bullets were designed for use with the BRAMIT device. These had butllets in these cartridges had pointed tips.

    The revolver with the BRAMIT device was supposed to be used by special agents. Similar revolvers, for example, were used as weapons by the NKVD, CMERSH and saboteurs, thrown in the rear of German troops during the Second World War. The BRAMIT device was produced at the Tula Weapons Factory in small batches. It didn't get a lot of real use due to problems with its short effective range.

    The Mitini brothers also designed a BRAMIT device designated for use in conjunction with the model 1891 rifle. The device consists of a cylinder of 32mm diameter and length of 140mm, with the middle part divided into 2 chambers. Each chamber is closed with a seal - cylindrical construction of soft rubber of 15mm thickness.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default

    Sorry to resurrect a zombie thread, but I came across mention of this device/revolver in a book I recently bought ("Oruzhie Spetsnaza", by Ardashev and Fedoseev), and thought I'd add what I found; apparently, the brothers Mitny made more than a few suppressed firearm designs, to the point where later partisans would often call ANY silencer a "BraMit device". Anyway, their initial design was of the type described and pictured above, basically a modified 7.62 Nagant that fired saboted .22 calibre projectles; the revolver would seal the barrel/cylinder gap at the rear, and the muzzle was closed off with a pivoting drum that would catch the sabot, but allow the .22 calibre projectile to travel through the device. After the shot, the front drum could be rotated to eject the sabot out the back, and it would be ready for another shot. HTH.




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