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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    109

    Default COLT DA .41 , Please help me identify the model.

    Can anyone tell me what model this is. It is a colt pre 1898 MFG in .41 caliber, It obviously does NOT have its original grips.

    I am just curious to know as I taught this was a model 1892,but it does not have any cylinder stop notches on the cylinder. From all the research I made, I have NOT seen one without cylinder notches. and look at the extractor rod tip it is much different from a 1892.







    I am pretty puzzled. can anyone help ?
    Last edited by CaptainStef1; 05-11-2008 at 06:27 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    462

    Default

    Your pistol is the Colt 1889 Navy Model produced from 1889 to 1894. Approximately 31,000 were manufactured. If you want to know the year your Colt was made, post the serial number range it is in.
    Last edited by Clermont; 05-11-2008 at 12:21 PM.

  3. #3
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Oldsmar, FL (Tampa Bay)
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    22,907

    Default

    Kinda looks like an 1889 Navy, without the common later modification to the 1895 type cylinder with stop notches. There are a lot of modifications, factory and after market, found in early swing out cylinder Colts so the extractor rod tip may be explained by that.
    The original grips were probably hard rubber. A few were made with rosewood.
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Serial number range : 296XX .

    Will grips from a Colt 1892 fit on this ? or any Idea of what will fit. Grips from Police positive maybe ? Hard rubber or wood ?

    What would be closest to original ?
    Last edited by CaptainStef1; 05-11-2008 at 09:17 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Your serial number would fall into the last year of production, 1894. What sets the Colt 1889 Navy Model apart from the Colt 1892 Army and Navy Model, I believe, is an improved cylinder with locking notches, so it is possible the grips will interchange. Two piece hard rubber or wood grips would be correct although the markings on the rubber grips may be different between the 1889 and 1892 Models.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Can someone explain to me how the cylinder locks up if there is no lock up notch ? Was the timming affected by this ? Or is there an other type of mechanism locking the cylinder in line with the firing pin and the barrel ?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Quoting from "The Book Of Colt Firearms", "...... with the cylinder locked into position by action of the pawl or hand on the ratchet teeth at the back".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,122

    Default

    This was one fault of these early Colt DA revolvers.
    When the action is at rest, the cylinder is free to rotate.
    This could easily cause the cylinder of a fired revolver to rotate unnoticed and position a fired chamber next in line.

    296XX was made in 1894.
    The numbers that year ran from 28000 to 31000 and was the last year of production for the Model 1889.

    The 1889 was the world's FIRST double action, swing out cylinder revolver so it has historical value.
    Every other Colt revolver made up to the Python was a variation of these early Colt's.

    Use caution when handling it. The action is rather delicate and complicated. These often get out of order or break, and there are no more available parts or gunsmiths who will repair them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    3,073
    Early double action Colt pistols are often long term gunsmith projects.
    That is why few gunsmiths will take them on.

    I have a couple that I have repaired.

    if I were to resell them and pay myself for the hours I have into them I would have an asking price of over $2K each.

    Needless to say nothing sells at that price and I am not going to take on one of those D.A. Colts for any customer anytime soon.
    Semper Fi,
    ret_Marine2003

    Located at American Legion post 300, somewhere in Northern Michigan.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    I am not into shooting with those antique, of course I want it to be more mechanically and physically sound than possible ,but as long timing is good, action is tight and bore is acceptable it is fine with me as it will not see much use in my hand, Probably will pick up more wear from the rubbing and shinning than anything else.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    630

    Default

    Nice Colt Captain :cool:
    I like it .

    For anyone intersested in these models , I highly recommend Bob Best's book A Study of Colt's New Army and Navy Pattern Double Action Revolvers 1889-1908 . No better source of up to date info .

    Here's a look at one of the last DA41's made around 1908 I think . You can see the improved cylinder locking notches on the cylinder mentioned earlier .

    mitch

    Please support Crimson Trace grips . They support our troops .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    [/QUOTE]

    Can anyone tell me where I could find a set of grips, and a ejector rod head like the one on this revolver ?

    I dont really like the Ugly as hell grip, and the ejector rod head on mine.

    Last edited by CaptainStef1; 05-14-2008 at 08:09 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    462

    Default

    Gun Parts Corporation lists parts for the Colt New Army/Navy that, I believe, is the Model 1892 series of Colt Army/Navy double action revolvers. Grips and the ejector head are listed. You can check with them to see if the parts are compatible with your Colt 1889 Navy revolver.

    http://e-gunparts.com/productschem.a...N%20NEW%20NAVY

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Clermont View Post
    Gun Parts Corporation lists parts for the Colt New Army/Navy that, I believe, is the Model 1892 series of Colt Army/Navy double action revolvers. Grips and the ejector head are listed. You can check with them to see if the parts are compatible with your Colt 1889 Navy revolver.

    http://e-gunparts.com/productschem.a...N%20NEW%20NAVY
    Thanks for the info Clermont ! Parts ordered .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Can someone tell me if this revolver will fit a holster made for a Smth & Wesson Victory model .38 cal ? Are they similar in size and shape ?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    630

    Default

    I believe the Colt's frame is slightly longer . Should be close though . I guess it depends on how precisely fit the holster is .
    mitch

    Please support Crimson Trace grips . They support our troops .

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default da 41

    hi

    I have a da 41 ser num 31563. does any know when this modle was made
    and approximate its value

    thanks
    jtlc

  18. #18
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Midwest.
    Posts
    10,852

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jtlc100 View Post
    hi

    I have a da 41 ser num 31563. does any know when this modle was made
    and approximate its value

    thanks
    jtlc
    "da 41" describes Colt revolvers manufactured since 1877... Your's could be one of about eight models.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,122

    Default

    Assuming it's a double action, swing out cylinder gun, it was probably made in 1895.

    The New Navy model numbers stopped around 31,000, and the New Army & Navy number would have been 1895.
    1895 started at 15,100, 1896 started at 68,000.

    Value depends entirely on actual condition of original finish, whether it's in working condition, whether it has all original parts and grips, etc.
    These have to be in pretty good shape to be worth higher values.
    As example, one in about 80% original condition would be worth "about" $300, and few are in that good a condition.

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