Civil Guard Photographic Archive - Page 2
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Thread: Civil Guard Photographic Archive

  1. #46
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    The first page of a certified copy of the patent granted for SAKO for the invention of a "rifle sight" (i.e. the rear sight of m/28-30).


  2. #47
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    THe British BD blouse was not issued on a wide spread basis on the front due to its color being close to that of the enemy and iyt was avoided. Rear line and trousers yes but the brown wool was not a good choice for the front line troops.
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  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic View Post
    THe British BD blouse was not issued on a wide spread basis on the front due to its color being close to that of the enemy and iyt was avoided. Rear line and trousers yes but the brown wool was not a good choice for the front line troops.
    In addition to which much of the British-donated BD blouses & pants came in such a small sizes, that they got issued to Sotilaspojat (Soldier Boys) organisation, which was organisation for 15 - 18 year old boys who had volunteered to help Finnish military in non-combat capacity.

    Jarkko

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  5. #49
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    I found this nice photograph album from Sortavala Civil Guard District.




  6. #50
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    Finnish soldiers, Koskenlaskija cheese and a 1937 Pattern Mess Tin in June 1941. SA-Kuva 22538:




  7. #51
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    From what I understand the P37 mess tins were not uncommon during the opening phases of the Continuation war, much like the P37 battle dress trousers

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  9. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vic View Post
    THe British BD blouse was not issued on a wide spread basis on the front due to its color being close to that of the enemy and iyt was avoided. Rear line and trousers yes but the brown wool was not a good choice for the front line troops.
    Are you saying that they issued BD trousers with Finnish tunics for the front lines? Interesting.
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  10. #54
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  11. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywarp View Post
    Any idea what aircraft that is?
    It's a Finnish-made VL Sääski IIA. It was operated by Ilmailukomppania ("Aviation Company") under the Helsinki Civil Guard District.

  12. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mangrove View Post
    It's a Finnish-made VL Sääski IIA. It was operated by Ilmailukomppania ("Aviation Company") under the Helsinki Civil Guard District.
    Thanks! What a pretty aircraft.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VL_S%C3%A4%C3%A4ski

  13. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mangrove View Post
    It's a Finnish-made VL Sääski IIA. It was operated by Ilmailukomppania ("Aviation Company") under the Helsinki Civil Guard District.
    I really like this old ad from the company..
    Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #58
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    Semi-OT: One of the most interesting set of photos in site that Mangrove posted are the hundreds of photographs from C.G.E. Mannerheim's exploration through central Asia and China in 1906-1908. Link.
    Rautatieilmatorjuntakonekiväärikomppania

  15. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny View Post
    I really like this old ad from the company..
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1890489
    That is cool! They must have also made the licensed Fokker D.21s?

  16. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywarp View Post
    That is cool! They must have also made the licensed Fokker D.21s?
    Not sure but a link to a bunch of info..
    http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtop...2747&start=135


    Mangrove, hope its not to much of a detraction from your cool post, Denny

  17. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny View Post
    Not sure but a link to a bunch of info..
    http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtop...2747&start=135


    Mangrove, hope its not to much of a detraction from your cool post, Denny
    I've read that thread before... it's a little... funny.

  18. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywarp View Post
    They must have also made the licensed Fokker D.21s?
    Here's a brochure made by the Valtion Lentokonetehdas (State Aircraft Factory) in 1938. It's in English. Apart from the Finnish types, they manufactured license-built Blackburn Ripons, de Havilland Moths, Gloster Gamecocks, Fokker C.X and D.XXIs and Bristol Blenheims at Tampere. They also made spare parts for them and also for e.g. Brewster F2A Buffalo.

  19. #63
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    The Civil Guard was a far cry from the Home Guard in the US during the War Between the States. It's really more akin to Volunteer Fire Departments in the US when you get down to it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mangrove View Post
    The Swedish Military forum guys would be interested in this pic. A Swedish M96 in use in Finland prior to the Winter War raises the question of how many were in the Civil Guard, and how they fared in competitive shooting. A "SA" stamped M96 sits in a rack alongside my M27, M28/30 and M39's.

  23. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post
    The Swedish Military forum guys would be interested in this pic. A Swedish M96 in use in Finland prior to the Winter War raises the question of how many were in the Civil Guard, and how they fared in competitive shooting. A "SA" stamped M96 sits in a rack alongside my M27, M28/30 and M39's.
    According Palokangas there were about 1,360 Swedish m/96 rifles in Finnish Army inventory in year 1919. They got transferred to Civil Guard, which issued them mainly to Civil Guard districts of Finnish west coast, which were in large extent Swedish-speaking. As for how well these rifles faired in competitive shooting, its hard to say. Its known that Mosin-Nagants m/91 were unpopular for target shooting especially early on - not only due to limitations of the rifle design, but also because in early years only 7.62 x 54R ammunition commonly available to Civil Guard was captured Russian World War 1 era ammunition, which was apparently found to be large extent sub-standard quality. Hence early on rifles other than m/91, including various Mausers and Japanese rifles, were commonly favored for competitive shooting.

    Jarkko

  24. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTV View Post
    According Palokangas there were about 1,360 Swedish m/96 rifles in Finnish Army inventory in year 1919. They got transferred to Civil Guard, which issued them mainly to Civil Guard districts of Finnish west coast, which were in large extent Swedish-speaking. As for how well these rifles faired in competitive shooting, its hard to say. Its known that Mosin-Nagants m/91 were unpopular for target shooting especially early on - not only due to limitations of the rifle design, but also because in early years only 7.62 x 54R ammunition commonly available to Civil Guard was captured Russian World War 1 era ammunition, which was apparently found to be large extent sub-standard quality. Hence early on rifles other than m/91, including various Mausers and Japanese rifles, were commonly favored for competitive shooting.

    Jarkko
    Thanks! I posted a link on the Swedish Military forum.

  25. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post
    The Swedish Military forum guys would be interested in this pic. A Swedish M96 in use in Finland prior to the Winter War raises the question of how many were in the Civil Guard, and how they fared in competitive shooting. A "SA" stamped M96 sits in a rack alongside my M27, M28/30 and M39's.
    Same here. I was overjoyed when I found mine.

  26. #70

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    Is there any information as to exactly how these m96 rifles came to be in Finnish service in 1919?

  27. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minionki Rozrabiaja View Post
    Is there any information as to exactly how these m96 rifles came to be in Finnish service in 1919?
    I suggest posting this question on the Swedish Military forum, since there are Swedish members there.

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