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Thread: Schultz & Larsen .22LR Match Rifles -Den Danske Matchgeværer

  1. #1
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    Default Schultz & Larsen .22LR Match Rifles -Den Danske Matchgeværer

    Before the war S&L had produced the Nr. 21, 22, 23 falling block rifles and the Nr.24 and Nr.33 bolt action .22 rifles. The Nr.21,22,23 rifles were, at the time, state-of-the-art target rifles and used in competitions in Scandinavia and internationally. The Nr.24 and 33 rifles were primarily intended for the Danish people to use in the Skytteforenings, or shooting clubs. The Nr. 24 would be the start of a long line of bolt action matchgeværer. All of the .22LR target rifles were intended for shooting matches held at 15 and 50 meters. There were also a few matches held at 100 meters. After World War II, Schultz & Larsen quickly ramped up production of .22 LR target rifles. Both Hans Schultz and Neils Larsen had the idea that target rifles should have heavy weight large diameter barrels and rigid receivers to offset the effects of barrel harmonics and the new series of match rifles that were produced after WW II certainly were all that.
    Hans Schultz died in 1937, but Neils Larsen and his sons carried on and the Nr.45, 46,47,49 rifles were the ideas and engineering of Neils and the boys. The first, the Nr.45, came out in 1945. The Nr.45 came with everything Neils Larsen believed a target rifle should have. It had a 28 inch (71.1cm) barrel length, with a muzzle diameter of .87 inches (22.3mm). The receiver and bolt, although inspired by the Nr. 24, are far more massive. In fact, the receivers on this series of S&L rifles are about the most massive I have ever seen on any kind of .22LR firearm, the front receiver ring measuring 1.3 inches (33.8mm) in diameter and 5.4 inches(137.6mm) in length. The rifle weighed some 12.5 pounds(5.68kg).
    The early production Nr. 45 rifles had a non-adjustable trigger and cork or wood ball palm rest. Later production of the Nr.45 shows both these features had been changed to an adjustable trigger and more “modern” style palm rest. Nr.45 and early production Nr. 46 rifles had a robust rear diopter sight that attached to a dovetail key that slid into a dovetail milled into the left rear of the receiver. The dovetail allowed some forward/rearward sight adjustment. Somewhere between serial numbers 536 and 674, the grooved receiver was omitted and diopters were simply mounted to drilled and tapped holes on the side of the receiver where the groove had been. The front sight was a tunnel diopter that could accept various types of inserts.
    The stock of the Nr.45 was a massive piece of European walnut, some of them very striking in appearance. In fact, to the eye, on some there is a resemblance to American black walnut, but without scientific analysis such as carried out by the USDA, that certainly can’t be confirmed on looks alone. The stock featured a small Schnabel on the fore end, hand checkering on the forearm grip area, inletted steel rails on the bottom for mounting sling swivels/hand stops and palm rests, and ergonomically designed thumbhole buttstock (in Danish the word is “tommelfingerhul”, one of my favorite Danish words:D), and an adjustable for length of pull hooked buttplate.
    The Nr. 45 soon was modified into the Nr.46, 47, and 49 rifles, possibly around serial number 600, but that is a guess. I will add more about the later rifles soon. It is unknown how many of the rifles were produced, but early production Model 61 22LR target rifles begins in 1959 at around serial number 2000. So, just guessing, probably less than a total of 2000 rifles were produced in the Nr.45-49 series. Some of these rifles were used in international shooting competitions that started up again after WW II. They were also used in the shooting club competitions in Denmark. Before the war, small bore shooting in Denmark was an extremely popular sport and the Danes, proportionally and per capita fired more rounds of .22 LR ammunition than any other country in Europe.
    The rifle in the photos below is my Nr.45. It has seen a lot of use and the stock has lost an inch or so in length, but it will still shoot one-hole groups at 15 meters.
    kriggevr - skarpskytte, samler, jger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  2. #2
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    Very interesting stuff.

    A question:

    You mention that target shooting was quite popular among the Danes.

    Who owned the rifles?

    Were they owned by clubs and shot by the members or privately owned, or a combination of both?
    Formerly LeeSpeed; I believe in God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth...and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary...I believe in the Holy Spirit...the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting.

  3. #3
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    Hej,

    I believe it was a combination of both. I have talked to people in Denmark who owned or still own the "free" match rifles themselves. I have been told the club rifles like the M24 and M70, were also sometimes owned privately, but I have not communicated with an individual who has owned one of those models. In the book it is stated that S&L produced those models for the shooting clubs, but what that means isn't made clear.
    kriggevr - skarpskytte, samler, jger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

  4. #4
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    Kriggevaer - I have a K31-actioned target rifle in .308Win with a Schultz & Larsen barrel. It shoots my homeloads into 3/4MOA all day long.

    E-mail via pm if you want piccies - it's the only way I can post images from my home PC.

    tac

  5. #5
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    Hello Tac,

    You kindly sent me those pics a few months back:D But, I have a question for you, have you had any experience with the Swing centerfire target rifles that were built in England which used Schultz & Larsen barrels?

    Best Regards
    kriggevr - skarpskytte, samler, jger
    "Roland was a warrior from the Land of the Midnight Sun..."

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